molecule


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mol·e·cule

 (mŏl′ĭ-kyo͞ol′)
n.
1. The smallest particle of a substance that retains the chemical and physical properties of the substance and is composed of two or more atoms; a group of like or different atoms held together by chemical forces.
2. A small particle; a tiny bit.

[French molécule, from New Latin mōlēcula, diminutive of Latin mōlēs, mass.]

molecule

(ˈmɒlɪˌkjuːl)
n
1. (Chemistry) the simplest unit of a chemical compound that can exist, consisting of two or more atoms held together by chemical bonds
2. a very small particle
[C18: via French from New Latin mōlēcula, diminutive of Latin mōlēs mass]

mol•e•cule

(ˈmɒl əˌkyul)

n.
1. the smallest physical unit of an element or compound, consisting of one or more like atoms in an element and two or more different atoms in a compound.
2. a quantity of a substance, the weight of which is numerically equal to the molecular weight; gram molecule.
3. any very small particle.
[1785–95; earlier molecula < New Latin, = Latin mōlē(s) mass + -cula -cule1]

mol·e·cule

(mŏl′ĭ-kyo͞ol′)
A group of two or more atoms linked together by sharing electrons in a chemical bond.

molecule

The smallest part of an element or chemical compound which can exist independently with all the properties of the element or compound. It is made up of one or more atoms bonded together in a fixed whole number ratio.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.molecule - (physics and chemistry) the simplest structural unit of an element or compoundmolecule - (physics and chemistry) the simplest structural unit of an element or compound
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
chemical chain, chain - (chemistry) a series of linked atoms (generally in an organic molecule)
dipole molecule - a molecule that is a permanent dipole
protein molecule - any large molecule containing chains of amino acids linked by peptide bonds
building block, unit - a single undivided natural thing occurring in the composition of something else; "units of nucleic acids"
atom - (physics and chemistry) the smallest component of an element having the chemical properties of the element
chemical group, radical, group - (chemistry) two or more atoms bound together as a single unit and forming part of a molecule
coenzyme - a small molecule (not a protein but sometimes a vitamin) essential for the activity of some enzymes
EDTA, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid - a complex molecule used medically to chelate metal ions in cases of lead or heavy metal poisoning
macromolecule, supermolecule - any very large complex molecule; found only in plants and animals
2.molecule - (nontechnical usage) a tiny piece of anythingmolecule - (nontechnical usage) a tiny piece of anything
grain - a relatively small granular particle of a substance; "a grain of sand"; "a grain of sugar"
grinding - material resulting from the process of grinding; "vegetable grindings clogged the drain"
material, stuff - the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object; "coal is a hard black material"; "wheat is the stuff they use to make bread"
chylomicron - a microscopic particle of triglycerides produced in the intestines during digestion; in the bloodstream they release their fatty acids into the blood
flyspeck - a tiny dark speck made by the excrement of a fly
identification particle - a tiny particle of material that can be added to a product to indicate the source of manufacture

molecule

noun particle, atom, mite, jot, speck, mote, iota a molecule of sulfur trioxide

molecule

noun
Translations
جُزَيءجُزَيءٌ
molekula
molekyle
molekyyli
molekula
molekula
sameindsameind, mólekúl
分子
분자
molekulėmolekulinis
molekula
molekula
molekyl
โมเลกุล
phân tử

molecule

[ˈmɒlɪkjuːl] N (Chem) → molécula f

molecule

[ˈmɒlɪkjuːl] nmolécule f
water molecules → les molécules d'eau

molecule

nMolekül nt

molecule

[ˈmɒlɪkjuːl] nmolecola

molecule

(ˈmolikjuːl) noun
the group of atoms that is the smallest unit into which a substance can be divided without losing its basic nature or identity.
moˈlecular (-ˈle-) adjective

molecule

جُزَيءٌ molekula molekyle Molekül μόριο molécula molekyyli molécule molekula molecola 分子 분자 molecuul molekyl cząsteczka molécula молекула molekyl โมเลกุล molekül phân tử 分子

mol·e·cule

n. molécula, unidad mínima de una sustancia.

molecule

n molécula
References in classic literature ?
But to come to a stop involved the jamming of myself, molecule by molecule, into whatever lay in my way; meant bringing my atoms into such intimate contact with those of the obstacle that a profound chemical reaction--possibly a far-reaching explosion --would result, and blow myself and my apparatus out of all possible dimensions--into the Unknown.
Now, at the moment when the door had opened to admit the cardinal, the nine parts of self-esteem in Gringoire, swollen and expanded by the breath of popular admiration, were in a state of prodigious augmentation, beneath which disappeared, as though stifled, that imperceptible molecule of which we have just remarked upon in the constitution of poets; a precious ingredient, by the way, a ballast of reality and humanity, without which they would not touch the earth.
Any one observing him would have seen a change in his complexion, in the adjustment of his facial muscles, in the vividness of his glance, which might have made them imagine that every molecule in his body had passed the message of a magic touch.
Consider every molecule of air to be a mudbank in itself.
molecule, the corpuscle and the atom in that it is an ion.
Thus, then, advancing from atom to molecule, from molecule to nebulous mass, from that to principal star, from star to sun, from sun to planet, and hence to satellite, we have the whole series of transformations undergone by the heavenly bodies during the first days of the world.
Little by little, as ages went on, a change took place; a general law of attraction manifested itself, to which the hitherto errant atoms became obedient: these atoms combined together chemically according to their affinities, formed themselves into molecules, and composed those nebulous masses with which the depths of the heavens are strewed.
By attentively watching, the observer would then have perceived the other molecules of the mass, following the example of this central star, become likewise condensed by gradually accelerated rotation, and gravitating round it in the shape of innumerable stars.
This motion, faithful to the laws of mechanics, would have been accelerated with the diminution of its volume; and a moment would have arrived when the centrifugal force would have overpowered the centripetal, which causes the molecules all to tend toward the center.
You might as well ask a man to eat molecules with a pair of chopsticks, as to try to interest me about the less carnivora, when I know of what is before me.
The world itself was not so amazing because of the atoms and molecules that composed it according to the propulsions of irresistible force; what made it amazing was the fact that Ruth lived in it.
We were all monkeys before we were men, and molecules before we were monkeys