mollusc


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Related to mollusc: molluscum contagiosum

mol·lusc

 (mŏl′əsk)
n.
Variant of mollusk.

mollusc

(ˈmɒləsk) or

mollusk

n
(Animals) any invertebrate of the phylum Mollusca, having a soft unsegmented body and often a shell, secreted by a fold of skin (the mantle). The group includes the gastropods (snails, slugs, etc), bivalves (clams, mussels, etc), and cephalopods (cuttlefish, octopuses, etc)
[C18: via New Latin from Latin molluscus, from mollis soft]
molluscan, molluskan adj, n
ˈmollusc-ˌlike, ˈmollusk-ˌlike adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mollusc - invertebrate having a soft unsegmented body usually enclosed in a shellmollusc - invertebrate having a soft unsegmented body usually enclosed in a shell
carapace, cuticle, shell, shield - hard outer covering or case of certain organisms such as arthropods and turtles
invertebrate - any animal lacking a backbone or notochord; the term is not used as a scientific classification
Mollusca, phylum Mollusca - gastropods; bivalves; cephalopods; chitons
scaphopod - burrowing marine mollusk
gastropod, univalve - a class of mollusks typically having a one-piece coiled shell and flattened muscular foot with a head bearing stalked eyes
coat-of-mail shell, polyplacophore, sea cradle, chiton - primitive elongated bilaterally symmetrical marine mollusk having a mantle covered with eight calcareous plates
bivalve, lamellibranch, pelecypod - marine or freshwater mollusks having a soft body with platelike gills enclosed within two shells hinged together
cephalopod, cephalopod mollusk - marine mollusk characterized by well-developed head and eyes and sucker-bearing tentacles
shellfish - meat of edible aquatic invertebrate with a shell (especially a mollusk or crustacean)
Translations
měkkýš
nilviäinen
mekušac
molluskweekdier
mięczak
mehkužec

mollusc

mollusk (US) [ˈmɒləsk] Nmolusco m

mollusc

[ˈmɒləsk] nmollusque m

mollusc

nMolluske f (spec), → Weichtier nt

mollusc

mollusk (Am) [ˈmɒləsk] nmollusco

mol·lusc

, mollusk
n. molusco.
References in classic literature ?
And as he walked to the fifteenth tee, after winning the fourteenth, he felt that this was Life, that till now he had been a mere mollusc.
Certainly, one findeth pearls in them: thereby they are the more like hard molluscs.
Apart, in separate compartments, were spread out chaplets of pearls of the greatest beauty, which reflected the electric light in little sparks of fire; pink pearls, torn from the pinna-marina of the Red Sea; green pearls, yellow, blue, and black pearls, the curious productions of the divers molluscs of every ocean, and certain mussels of the water courses of the North; lastly, several specimens of inestimable value.
This brought the lecturer to the great ladder of animal life, beginning low down in molluscs and feeble sea creatures, then up rung by rung through reptiles and fishes, till at last we came to a kangaroo-rat, a creature which brought forth its young alive, the direct ancestor of all mammals, and presumably, therefore, of everyone in the audience.
The Silurian Lingula differs but little from the living species of this genus; whereas most of the other Silurian Molluscs and all the Crustaceans have changed greatly.
On the leaves, also, various patelliform shells, Trochi, uncovered molluscs, and some bivalves are attached.
The idea, said Dr Taylor, was to create an "artificial river" for the molluscs.
Additionally, the introduction of exotic mollusc species such as Melanoides tuberculata has contributed to the elimination of certain native species (Avellar, 1999; Mansur et al.
Evaluation of mollusc as sensitive indicator of heavy metal pollution in aquatic system: A Review.
The first part of the book provides introductory information on the higher taxonomy, external and internal anatomy, reproduction, habitats, biotic relationships and behaviour of nudibranchs and related molluscs, followed by text descriptions and illustrations of 173 species of nudibranch and 76 other species including bubble shells, sap-sucking sea slugs, sea hares, umbrella shells and side-gilled slugs.
These data reflect the importance of the state of Espirito Santo as being a reservoir area for the disease and investigations on factors that determine mollusc species richness and distribution in wetland systems are scarce in the Neotropical region (Maltchik et al.
Other potential effects arising from climate change on mollusc may comprise habitat changes and physical disturbance as a result of sea level rise or higher frequency of storms affecting wind and wave conditions.