momentum


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mo·men·tum

 (mō-mĕn′təm)
n. pl. mo·men·ta (-tə) or mo·men·tums
1. Symbol pPhysics A quantity used to measure the motion of a body, equal to the product of the body's mass and its velocity. Also called linear momentum.
2.
a. The force or energy exhibited by a moving body: The ball did not have enough momentum to reach the goalposts.
b. The driving force or advancing strength of a development or course of events: The effort to reform public education has been gaining momentum.
3. Philosophy An essential or constituent element; a moment.

[Latin mōmentum, movement, from *movimentum, from movēre, to move; see meuə- in Indo-European roots.]

momentum

(məʊˈmɛntəm)
n, pl -ta (-tə) or -tums
1. (General Physics) physics the product of a body's mass and its velocity. Symbol: p See also angular momentum
2. (General Physics) the impetus of a body resulting from its motion
3. driving power or strength
[C17: from Latin: movement; see moment]

mo•men•tum

(moʊˈmɛn təm)

n., pl. -ta (-tə), -tums.
1. force or speed of movement; impetus, as of a physical object or course of events: a career that lost momentum.
2. Mech. a quantity expressing the motion of a body or system, equal to the product of the mass of a body and its velocity.
[1690–1700; < Latin mōmentum; see moment]

mo·men·tum

(mō-mĕn′təm)
A quantity used to measure the motion of a body, equal to the product of its mass and velocity. Any change in the speed or direction of a body changes its momentum.
moment, momentum - Latin momentum, from movere, "move," and -mentum, is the source of moment and momentum, which first meant "moving power."
See also related terms for moment.

momentum

Mass multiplied by velocity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.momentum - an impelling force or strengthmomentum - an impelling force or strength; "the car's momentum carried it off the road"
forcefulness, strength, force - physical energy or intensity; "he hit with all the force he could muster"; "it was destroyed by the strength of the gale"; "a government has not the vitality and forcefulness of a living man"
2.momentum - the product of a body's mass and its velocitymomentum - the product of a body's mass and its velocity; "the momentum of the particles was deduced from meteoritic velocities"
physical property - any property used to characterize matter and energy and their interactions
angular momentum - the product of the momentum of a rotating body and its distance from the axis of rotation; "any rotating body has an angular momentum about its center of mass"; "angular momentum makes the world go round"

momentum

noun impetus, force, power, drive, push, energy, strength, thrust, propulsion, welly (slang) This campaign is really gaining momentum.
Translations
زَخَم، قُوَّة دافِعَه
hybnost
fart
incitationquantité de mouvement
mozgásmennyiség
skriîòungi
judėjimo kiekisvaromoji jėga
kustības daudzums
hybnosť

momentum

[məʊˈmentəm] N (momentums or momenta (pl)) [məʊˈmentə] (Phys) → momento m (fig) → ímpetu m, impulso m
to gather or gain momentum (lit) → cobrar velocidad (fig) → ganar fuerza

momentum

[məʊˈmɛntəm] n
[process, movement] → impulsion f, élan m
to gather momentum [process, movement] → s'accélérer
(PHYSICS)quantité f de mouvement

momentum

n (of moving object)Schwung m; (at moment of impact) → Wucht f; (Phys) → Impuls m; (fig)Schwung m; the rock’s momentum carried it through the wallder Felsbrocken hatte eine solche Wucht, dass er die Mauer durchschlug; he let the car go under its own momentumer ließ das Auto von allein weiterrollen; to gather or gain momentum (lit)sich beschleunigen, in Fahrt kommen (inf); (fig, idea, movement, plan) → in Gang kommen; the campaign is now gathering or gaining momentumdie Kampagne kommt nun in Gang or in Schwung; to keep going under its own momentum (lit)sich aus eigener Kraft weiterbewegen; (fig)eine Eigendynamik entwickelt haben; to lose momentum (lit, fig)Schwung verlieren

momentum

[məʊˈmɛntəm] n (Phys) → momento, quantità f inv di moto (fig) → slancio, impeto, velocità f inv acquisita
to gather or gain momentum (vehicle, person) → acquistare or prendere velocità, aumentare di velocità (fig) → prendere or guadagnare terreno
to lose momentum (vehicle, person) → perdere velocità (fig) → perdere vigore

momentum

(məˈmentəm) noun
the amount or force of motion in a moving body.

mo·men·tum

n. L. momentum; ímpetu; fuerza de movimiento.
References in classic literature ?
Every soldier in Napoleon's army felt this and the invasion moved on by its own momentum.
The last bullet of all, making a double ricochet from two different trees and losing most of its momentum, struck Sheldon a sharp blow on the forehead and dropped at his feet.
The order to stop her had been given, and the frigate now simply went on by her own momentum.
He halted with awkward abruptness, with stiff fore-legs bracing himself against his momentum, almost sitting down on his haunches, so desirous was he of avoiding contact with the dog he was in the act of attacking.
This idea admits not of precise demonstration, because there is no rule by which we can measure the momentum of civil power necessary to the government of any given number of individuals; but when we consider that the island of Britain, nearly commensurate with each of the supposed confederacies, contains about eight millions of people, and when we reflect upon the degree of authority required to direct the passions of so large a society to the public good, we shall see no reason to doubt that the like portion of power would be sufficient to perform the same task in a society far more numerous.
Thus the energy developed by good fighting men is as the momentum of a round stone rolled down a mountain thousands of feet in height.
Two methods are used; one is to plac a carcass on a level piece of ground within an enclosure o sticks with an opening, and when the condors are gorged to gallop up on horseback to the entrance, and thus enclos them: for when this bird has not space to run, it canno give its body sufficient momentum to rise from the ground The second method is to mark the trees in which, frequentl to the number of five or six together, they roost, and the at night to climb up and noose them.
The balloon, which had again lost its momentum, was floating in sight of an oasis, a sort of islet studded with green trees, thrown up upon the surface of this sandy ocean.
It was a heavy spear shod with iron, and behind it were the giant muscles of the ape-man, while coming to meet it was the enormous weight of Buto and the momentum of his rapid rush.
Joe's fist passed on through empty air, and so great was the momentum of the blow that it carried him around, in a half twirl, sideways.
Formerly they had not altogether delighted in the contemplated match with Lucy, but now their dread of a marriage between Stephen and Maggie added its momentum to their genuine pity and indignation on behalf of the gentle forsaken girl, in making them desire that he should return to her.
But Patsy, charging like a bull, had the momentum of his rush, while Watson, whirling to meet him, had no momentum.