mommy track


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mommy track

n.
A career path determined by work arrangements offering mothers certain benefits, such as flexible hours, but usually providing them with fewer opportunities for advancement.

mommy track

n
US a path in life in which a woman devotes most of her time to her children and home rather than to her career

mom′my track`


n.
a path of career advancement for women who are willing to forgo some promotions and pay increases so that they can spend more time with their children.
[1985–90]
References in periodicals archive ?
Forget the bogus mommy track, discrimination drives the wage gap.
Among those who aren't forced into these less permanent positions are the highly educated and experienced women who are building their own mommy track.
In The Mommy Track Divides: The impact of Childbearing on Wages of Women of Differing Skill Levels (NBER Working Paper No.
Although several stated that they did not experience the so-called mommy track, they also reported that they were unable to do some of the more exciting, quick-turnaround work that would require longer hours or working on days off.
And especially if you and your other half fancied yourselves to be sophisticated ladies before you began racing along together on the mommy track.
Blaming the lack of family-friendly policies hardly resolves the dilemma: In European countries such as Sweden, family-friendly policies often keep women on the mommy track.
We explore the gender subtext in three organizational settings: show pieces (the token position of the few women in top functions), the mommy track (the side track many women with young children are shunted to) and the importance of being asked ( the gendered practices of career making).
The 1991-93 assemblage Slave Ready (Corporate) - a woman's pinstripe suit with steel-wool trim (the "corporate" peignoir), an odd little "computer screen" painting with the message "Slave Ready," and a clock whose face begs for "one more minute" - suggests that hewing to the career path is as misguided as following the mommy track.
While Newsweek's headlines promise that the articles will show us What Parents Can do, the "solutions" article, Beating the Clock, lays out the usual suggestion--the mommy track.
And if other women were more willing to take up the battle that Schwartz has begun--a more prosaic battle than the one that emerges from Backlash, but one far more likely to improve the quality of women's lives--then maybe getting off the mommy track won't be quite as difficult for this year's Smith graduates as it has been in the past.
This is in striking contrast to their wives, who are seen as having to make a choice between work and family: either the fast track or the mommy track.