monarchy

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mon·ar·chy

 (mŏn′ər-kē, -är′-)
n. pl. mon·ar·chies
1. Government by a monarch.
2. A state ruled or headed by a monarch.

[Middle English monarchie, from Old French, from Latin monarchia, from Greek monarkhiā, from monarkhos, monarch; see monarch.]

mo·nar′chi·al (mə-när′kē-əl) adj.

monarchy

(ˈmɒnəkɪ)
n, pl -chies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a form of government in which supreme authority is vested in a single and usually hereditary figure, such as a king, and whose powers can vary from those of an absolute despot to those of a figurehead
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a country reigned over by a king, prince, or other monarch

mon•ar•chy

(ˈmɒn ər ki)

n., pl. -chies.
1. a government or state in which the supreme power is actually or nominally lodged in a monarch.
2. supreme power or sovereignty held by a single person.
3. the fact or state of being a monarchy.
[1300–50; Middle English < Late Latin < Greek]

monarchy

1. a governmental system in which supreme power is actually or nominally held by a monarch.
2. supreme power and authority held by one person; autocracy. — monarchie, monarchical, adj.
See also: Government

monarchy

A form of government headed by a hereditary ruler, such as a king or queen, or a country with this form of government.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monarchy - an autocracy governed by a monarch who usually inherits the authoritymonarchy - an autocracy governed by a monarch who usually inherits the authority
autocracy, autarchy - a political system governed by a single individual
parliamentary monarchy - a monarchy having a parliament
kingdom - a monarchy with a king or queen as head of state
empire - a monarchy with an emperor as head of state

monarchy

noun
1. sovereignty, despotism, autocracy, kingship, absolutism, royalism, monocracy a debate on the future of the monarchy
2. kingdom, empire, realm, principality The country was a monarchy until 1973.
Translations
الحُكومه المَلَكيهمَلْكِيةٌ
monarchie
monarki
monarkia
monarhija
monarchia
konungsríki; einvaldsríki; konungsveldi
君主制
군주제
monarchija
monarchia
monarhija
monarki
การปกครองโดยมีพระมหากษัตริย์เป็นประมุข
chế độ quân chủ

monarchy

[ˈmɒnəkɪ] Nmonarquía f

monarchy

[ˈmɒnərki] n
(= system) → monarchie f
when France was a monarchy → lorsque la France était une monarchie
the monarchy (= royal family) → la monarchie

monarchy

nMonarchie f

monarchy

[ˈmɒnəkɪ] nmonarchia

monarch

(ˈmonək) noun
a king, queen, emperor, or empress.
ˈmonarchyplural ˈmonarchies noun
(a country etc that has) government by a monarch.

monarchy

مَلْكِيةٌ monarchie monarki Monarchie μοναρχία monarquía monarkia monarchie monarhija monarchia 君主制 군주제 monarchie monarki monarchia monarquia монархия monarki การปกครองโดยมีพระมหากษัตริย์เป็นประมุข kraliyet chế độ quân chủ 君主国
References in classic literature ?
Yet were they as often engaged in wars, offensive and defensive, as the neighboring monarchies of the same times.
I am an admirer of Montesquieu," replied Prince Andrew, "and his idea that le principe des monarchies est l'honneur me parait incontestable.
The principle of monarchies is honor seems to me incontestable.
Historically, monarchies have disappeared either because of state collapse or because of catastrophic loss in war 6 close to, but not quite the same thing, in the cases of Austro-Hungary and the Balkan monarchies.
Pollack, the director of the Saban Center for Middle East policy at the Brookings Institution, said: 'What the monarchies have going for them are royal families that allow them to stand above the fray, to a certain extent.
If we compare this to the situation in our region following the so-called Arab Spring, we will see that the most stable states are monarchies or emirates, where there is no injustice, oppression or violations, rather the Arab monarchies are providing lessons in wisdom and flexibility, or what Hague described as a very pragmatic approach.
Second, and more surprising, is the relative resilience of the Arab monarchies to the Arab Spring: Morocco and Jordan, Saudi Arabia and Oman, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates, and Qatar and Bahrain have been reasonably unaffected and remain stable (in spite of the temporary clashes in Bahrain and their oppression with the help of Saudi Arabia's army).
Le Premier ministre de Bahrein a defendu hier dimanche un projet d'union des monarchies du Golfe, qui doit etre discute lors d'un sommet regional lundi a Riyad, mais que l'opposition chiite bahreinie a d'ores et deja critique, exigeant un referendum.
If as you claim, so many countries are envious of our monarchy, why are there so few monarchies left in the world?
Republics can be stable democracies while monarchies can be dictatorial.
Summary: Both republics and monarchies are threatened by the popular protests currently engulfing the Middle East and North Africa.
You Royalists look on the Royal Family from a fairytale point of view, its about time you came into the real world and realised that monarchies are from the past.