monastic


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Related to monastic: Monastic orders

mo·nas·tic

 (mə-năs′tĭk)
adj. also mo·nas·ti·cal (-tĭ-kəl)
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of a monastery. Used often of monks and nuns.
2. Resembling life in a monastery in style, structure, or manner, especially:
a. Secluded and contemplative.
b. Strictly disciplined or regimented.
c. Self-abnegating; austere.
n.
A monk.

[Middle English monastik, from Old French monastique, from Late Latin monasticus, from Late Greek monastikos, from Greek monazein, to live alone; see monastery.]

mo·nas′ti·cal·ly adv.

monastic

(məˈnæstɪk)
adj
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) of or relating to monasteries or monks, nuns, etc
2. resembling this sort of life; reclusive
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a person who is committed to this way of life, esp a monk
moˈnastically adv

mo•nas•tic

(məˈnæs tɪk)

adj. Also, mo•nas′ti•cal.
1. of or pertaining to monks, nuns, or monasteries: monastic vows.
2. of or resembling the secluded, dedicated, or austere life characteristic of a monastery.
n.
3. a member of a monastic community or order, esp. a monk.
[1400–50; < Late Latin monasticus < Late Greek monastikós; see monastery, -tic]
mo•nas′ti•cal•ly, adv.
mo•nas′ti•cism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monastic - a male religious living in a cloister and devoting himself to contemplation and prayer and workmonastic - a male religious living in a cloister and devoting himself to contemplation and prayer and work
Brother - (Roman Catholic Church) a title given to a monk and used as form of address; "a Benedictine Brother"
Carthusian - a member of the Carthusian order
religious - a member of a religious order who is bound by vows of poverty and chastity and obedience
Cistercian, Trappist - member of an order of monks noted for austerity and a vow of silence
Adj.1.monastic - of communal life sequestered from the world under religious vowsmonastic - of communal life sequestered from the world under religious vows
unworldly - not concerned with the temporal world or swayed by mundane considerations; "was unworldly and did not greatly miss worldly rewards"- Sheldon Cheney

monastic

Translations
دَيْري، رَهْباني
klášterní
kloster-klosteragtig
klösterlichmonastisch
kolostori
klaustur-; munka-
kláštorný
manastır hayatına ait

monastic

[məˈnæstɪk]
A. ADJmonástico
B. CPD monastic order Norden f monástica
monastic vows NPLvotos mpl monásticos

monastic

[məˈnæstɪk] adjmonastique

monastic

adjmönchisch, klösterlich; monastic lifeKlosterleben nt; monastic buildingKlostergebäude nt; monastic orderMönchsorden m; monastic vowsOrdensgelübde nt; he leads a monastic existence (fig)er lebt wie ein Mönch

monastic

[məˈnæstɪk] adjmonastico/a

monastery

(ˈmonəstəri) plural ˈmonasteries noun
a house in which a community of monks lives.
moˈnastic (-ˈnӕ-) adjective
of, or like, monks or monasteries. the monastic way of life.
References in classic literature ?
The upper dress of this personage resembled that of his companion in shape, being a long monastic mantle; but the colour, being scarlet, showed that he did not belong to any of the four regular orders of monks.
Let the matter be brought to an issue then according to our old-time monastic habit.
A pretty maid in an apron might be even more agreeable, perhaps; but for your severe monastic style it does very well.
In revolving these matters, while she undressed, it suddenly struck her as not unlikely that she might that morning have passed near the very spot of this unfortunate woman's confinement -- might have been within a few paces of the cell in which she languished out her days; for what part of the abbey could be more fitted for the purpose than that which yet bore the traces of monastic division?
Has it not preached in the place of these, charity and poverty, celibacy and mortification of the flesh, monastic life and Mother Church?
They had rambled round by a road which led to the well-known ruins of the Cistercian abbey behind the mill, the latter having, in centuries past, been attached to the monastic establishment.
That friend--single gentleman, or younger brother, which you will-- had at his heart a heavy sorrow; but it bred in him no misanthropy or monastic gloom.
The effect had been more fitting because so many of them had idly parodied pontifical or monastic dress.
Pale, heavy-browed, almost haggard with a sort of monastic rigidity in her dress, she had little but her pure features in common with the woman whose radiant good grace he had hitherto admired.
Plenty of its other writing remains in the shape of religious prose--sermons, lives and legends of saints, biblical paraphrases, and similar work in which the monastic and priestly spirit took delight, but which is generally dull with the dulness of medieval commonplace didacticism and fantastic symbolism.
The scrupulous cleanliness maintained by Jacquotte gave a certain air of distinction to this picture of simplicity, but everything in it, down to the round table littered with stray papers, and the very pens on the writing-desk, gave the idea of an almost monastic life--a life so wholly filled with thought and feeling of a wider kind that outward surroundings had come to be matters of no moment.
An extern school grew round the old almost monastic foundation, which subsists still with its middle-age costume and usages--and all Cistercians pray that it may long flourish.