monetarism


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mon·e·ta·rism

 (mŏn′ĭ-tə-rĭz′əm, mŭn′-)
n.
1. A theory holding that economic variations within a given system, such as changing rates of inflation, are most often caused by increases or decreases in the money supply.
2. A policy that seeks to regulate an economy by altering the domestic money supply, especially by increasing it in a moderate but steady manner.

mon′e·ta·rist adj. & n.

monetarism

(ˈmʌnɪtəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. (Economics) the theory that inflation is caused by an excess quantity of money in an economy
2. (Economics) an economic policy based on this theory and on a belief in the efficiency of free market forces, that gives priority to achieving price stability by monetary control, balanced budgets, etc, and maintains that unemployment results from excessive real wage rates and cannot be controlled by Keynesian demand management
ˈmonetarist n, adj

mon•e•ta•rism

(ˈmɒn ɪ təˌrɪz əm, ˈmʌn-)

n.
a doctrine holding that changes in the money supply determine the direction of a nation's economy.
[1965–70, Amer.]
mon′e•ta•rist, n., adj.

monetarism

1. an economic theory maintaining that stability and growth in the economy are dependent on a steady growth rate in the supply of money.
2. the principle put forward by American economist Milton Friedman that control of the money supply and, thereby, of rate in the supply of credit serves to control inflation and recession while fostering prosperity. — monetarist, n., adj.
See also: Economics
an economie theory maintaining that stability and growth in the economy are dependent on a steady growth rate in the supply of money. — monetarist, n., adj.
See also: Money

monetarism

An economic policy based on controlling a country’s money supply.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monetarism - an economic theory holding that variations in unemployment and the rate of inflation are usually caused by changes in the supply of moneymonetarism - an economic theory holding that variations in unemployment and the rate of inflation are usually caused by changes in the supply of money
economic theory - (economics) a theory of commercial activities (such as the production and consumption of goods)
Translations
monetarizam
monetaryzm

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtərɪzəm] Nmonetarismo m

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtərɪzəm] nmonétarisme m

monetarism

nMonetarismus m

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtˌrɪzm] nmonetarismo
References in periodicals archive ?
I would prefer the response on Twitter from the Conservative whip Brooks Newark who wrote: "QE is the crack cocaine of monetarism.
The then financial editor of that esteemed publication seemed to be under the impression that monetarism was something to do with French painters and he clearly favoured a candidate who was as mystified about business as himself.
Understanding that monetarism can mean both the management of low inflation in good times, and the creation of inflation in bad times, has proven too difficult for most of the media.
of Texas at Austin) proclaims the doctrine of Reagonomics to be "Another God That Failed," in reference to the 1949 book of essays by famous ex-communists, in that its theoretical pillars of monetarism, supply-side economics (including tax cuts and deregulation), balanced budgets, and free trade in fact make up nothing more than a governing myth that serve as a mask for the "predator state," which engages in "the systematic abuse of public institutions for private profit or, equivalently, the systematic undermining of public protections for the benefit of private clients.
In particular, they alleged that Friedman used a harder-line and more mechanical version of monetarism in his journalism.
In their theoretical hearts, most monetary economists believe in some form of monetarism, that if a central bank prints enough money, ultimately prices must rise.
I was a staff member at the Board of Governors in the early 1970s, and remember the visceral negative reactions to monetarism so evident in many senior Fed staff members and governors.
One has only to think of the rise of such ideas an monetarism and privatisation to see how much is due to Right-wing organisations like the Centre for Political Studies (founded 1974 by Sir Keith Joseph) and the Adam Smith Institute (1977).
The historical path from Monetarism to Rational Expectations and ultimately to today's skirmishes between the New Classical and New Keynesian camps is one that produced much stronger microfoundations but has also drawn economics deep inside the natural-law realm -- where it is isolated from time, devoid of social content, and prepared to offer nothing but laissez-faire advice for nearly every practical problem.
Confidence in monetarism came along later and lasted longer.
1) This decline in income velocity has been interpreted as undermining a basic principle of monetarism, that is, the generally well-established predictable link between prior changes in money stock and in nominal income.
The clashes between governments' full employment objectives and the increasing monetarism of the major central banks--the Bundesbank since 1973, the Federal Reserve at the latest since fall 1978-could not go on indefinitely.