monism


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mo·nism

 (mō′nĭz′əm, mŏn′ĭz′əm)
n. Philosophy
1. The view in metaphysics that reality is a unified whole and that all existing things can be ascribed to or described by a single concept or system.
2. The doctrine that mind and matter are formed from, or reducible to, the same ultimate substance or principle of being.

mo′nist n.
mo·nis′tic (mō-nĭs′tĭk, mŏ-) adj.
mo·nis′ti·cal·ly adv.

monism

(ˈmɒnɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy the doctrine that the person consists of only a single substance, or that there is no crucial difference between mental and physical events or properties. Compare dualism2 See also materialism2, idealism3
2. (Philosophy) philosophy the doctrine that reality consists of an unchanging whole in which change is mere illusion. Compare pluralism5
3. (Philosophy) the epistemological theory that the object and datum of consciousness are identical
4. the attempt to explain anything in terms of one principle only
[C19: from Greek monos single + -ism]
ˈmonist n, adj
moˈnistic, moˈnistical adj
moˈnistically adv

mon•ism

(ˈmɒn ɪz əm, ˈmoʊ nɪz əm)

n.
1.
a. (in metaphysics) any of various theories holding that there is only one basic substance or principle as the ground of reality or that reality consists of a single element. Compare dualism (def. 2a), pluralism (def. 1a).
b. (in epistemology) a theory that the object and datum of cognition are identical.
2. the reduction of all processes, structures, etc., to a single governing principle.
3. the notion that there is only one causal factor in history.
[1860–65; < German Monismus. See mon-, -ism]
mon′ist, n.
mo•nis•tic (məˈnɪs tɪk, moʊ-) mo•nis′ti•cal, adj.
mo•nis′ti•cal•ly, adv.

monism

1. Metaphysics. a theory that only one basic substance or principle exists as the ground of reality. Cf. dualism, pluralism.
2. Metaphysics. a theory that reality consists of a single element. Cf. pluralism.
3. Epistemology. a theory that the object and the sense datum of cognition are identical. — monist, n.monistic, monistical, adj.
See also: Philosophy
Epistemology. a theory that the object and datum of cognition are identical.
See also: Knowledge
Metaphysics. any of various theories holding that there is only one basic substance or principle that is the ground of reality. — monist, n. — monistic, monistical, adj.
See also: Matter
the theory that there is only one causal factor in history, as intellect or nature. — monist, n. — monistic, adj.
See also: History

monism

The belief that all things are unified, or that they are all explained ultimately on one single principle or law.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monism - the doctrine that reality consists of a single basic substance or element
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
pluralism - the doctrine that reality consists of several basic substances or elements
References in classic literature ?
He'll talk Nietzsche, or Schopenhauer, or Kant, or anything, but the only thing in this world, not excepting Mary, that he really cares for, is his monism.
Long before the school of materialistic monism arose, the ground was removed so that there could be no foundation.
He, so warm in spirit, was dominated by that cold and forbidding philosophy, materialistic monism.
Inter alia, Potts mischaracterizes TDVP as "metaphysical, ""neutral monism," "pantheism, "and "illusion.
Russellian Monism faces problems with mental causation that parallel those of traditional dualism.
The controversies address: attempts to overcome the choice between materialism and dualism in the mind/body problem through Russelian monism, whether the body's role in cognition is causal or constitutive, the challenge of free-floating moods (e.
Given its primarily spiritual orientation, freigeistig monism relied heavily on the ongoing rhetorical liquidation of the Beyond in order to maintain the sacral qualities of Diesseits.
Amma argues for both the universalistic monism of Advaita Vedanta (iterated as non-Hindu spirituality) and the presumed Hindu proclivity toward hierarchical relativism (iterated as ecumenism).
While Yong's account is plausible, he seems to presume, rather than present, an argument in favor of Clayton's monism.
Nonetheless, if physicalist Russellian Monism is at least coherent, a successful argument against physicalism will have to rule against the possibility that while physical properties are responsible for phenomenal consciousness, we are ignorant of these properties, and this is why we lack a satisfactory physicalist account of the phenomenal.
Pythagoras' Quadrivium included mathematics, music, medicine, and astronomy, conceived as a set of dynamics that were interconnected and produced the harmony (harmonia--unity and coherence) of all things in the material and spiritual universes--the grounding Pythagorean monism.