monocarpic


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mon·o·car·pic

 (mŏn′ə-kär′pĭk) also mon·o·car·pous (-kär′pəs)
adj.
Flowering and bearing fruit only once.

mon′o·car′py n.

monocarpic

(ˌmɒnəʊˈkɑːpɪk) or

monocarpous

adj
(Botany) botany another name for semelparous Also: hapaxanthic

mon•o•car•pic

(ˌmɒn əˈkɑr pɪk)

also mon`o•car′pous,



adj.
producing fruit only once and then dying.
[1840–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.monocarpic - dying after bearing fruit only oncemonocarpic - dying after bearing fruit only once
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately it is monocarpic - dying after flowering - but there are always self-sown seedlings to carry on the show.
Owing to this monocarpic perennials have few representatives in floras of high-latitude or temperate mountain ranges [25].
Plants such as these that die after only flowering once are called monocarpic.
As a consequence of the huge reproductive effort, most Agave species (at least in the non-herbaceous taxa) are monocarpic (semelparous), they die shortly after reproduction (Eguiarte et al.
2003); the absence of a particularly close relationship with other members of the section Ditepalae, besides the dimorphic tepals (Gentry, 1982); rarely available flowers, which are the major structures with taxonomic significance, because it is a monocarpic species and the inflorescences stems are eliminated to prepare the plants for manufacture of mescal; few studies focused on the taxonomic aspects of this group.
In recent work, Monocarpic, he combines the abstract with the literal using both form and colour in a sophisticated way that adds layers of emotional and intellectual complexity to the piece.
Predator satiation and recruitment in a mast fruiting monocarpic forest herb.
The Himalayan poppy is monocarpic and dies after flowering.
What is the key characteristic of monocarpic plants?
Since monocarpic or short-lived perennials often depend on seed input for persistence, their dynamics often are vulnerable to seed losses (Louda and Potvin 1995).
Seed and seedling ecology of a monocarpic tropical tree, Taehigalia versicolor.