monolayer

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mon·o·lay·er

 (mŏn′ō-lā′ər)
n.
1. A film or layer of a compound one molecule thick.
2. A layer of cells one cell thick, grown in a culture.

monolayer

(ˈmɒnəʊˌleɪə)
n
(Chemistry) a single layer of atoms or molecules adsorbed on a surface. Also called: molecular film
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists predict that group-IV monolayers will be topological insulators, and the transition-metal dichalcogenides will be useful for valleytronics, says Fisher, while monolayer materials generally can be used as field-effect transistors and play a key role in future nano-electronic devices.
In this way, we examined whether SEPEC's cytotoxic factor facilitates transcytosis of these strains in HUVEC monolayers, possibly indicating how SEPEC may reach the bloodstream during sepsis.
As an example of this phenomenon, when sufficient vinblastine was applied to monolayers of MVB9 to reduce proliferating cells at 24 hours to around 20% of the untreated monolayer, the same concentration applied to the spheroid culture reduced the spheroid to approximately 80% of the untreated spheroid after 72 hours.
But how do these monolayers acquire their unique characteristics?
Objective: Epithelial monolayers are amongst the simplest tissues in the body, yet they play fundamental roles in adult organisms where they separate the internal environment from the external environment and in development when the intrinsic forces generated by cells within the monolayer drive tissue morphogenesis.
In Strategy two, DNA monolayers were treated with spermadine buffer to minimize intercalation/de intercalation of counter cations during the sensor read out step.
After testing the evaporation resistance, the dispersion rate and stability of the monolayers prepared from different emulsifiers were characterized.
There are a lot of studies of mixed polymer monolayers spread at the air/water surface (1-5).
Methods: Two liquid surfaces covered with phospholipid monolayers are brought into contact by oblique impact of a drop on a liquid surface.
Irradiation of a two-dimensional J aggregate monolayers leads to the formation of excitons spreading throughout the monolayers at a high speed, typically 2 km/s, coherently with extremely low energy losses.
The book's five chapters cover basics of electrical interfacial phenomena, interfacial charge and basic electrical double layer interfaces (EDIs), electrical aspects of surface pressure in amphiphilic monolayers, ion-exchange and ion-specific effects in lipid monolayers, and applications of interfacial electrical phenomena.
The results also suggest that low size GNPs doesn't affect the formation and stabilization of lipid monolayers.