monopsony

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Related to monopsonies: monopsonist

mo·nop·so·ny

 (mə-nŏp′sə-nē)
n. pl. mo·nop·so·nies
A market situation in which the product or service of several sellers is sought by only one buyer.

[mon(o)- + Greek opsōniā, purchase of food; see duopsony.]

mo·nop′so·nist n.
mo·nop′so·nis′tic adj.

monopsony

(məˈnɒpsənɪ)
n, pl -nies
(Economics) a situation in which the entire market demand for a product or service consists of only one buyer
[C20: mono- + Greek opsōnia purchase, from opsōnein to buy]
moˌnopsoˈnistic adj

mo•nop•so•ny

(məˈnɒp sə ni)

n., pl. -nies.
the market condition that exists when there is only one buyer for a product or service from a large number of sellers.
[1930–35; mon- + Greek opsōnía shopping, purchase of provisions]
mo•nop′so•nist, n.

monopsony

the market condition that exists when only one buyer will purchase the products of a number of sellers. — monopsonist, n.monopsonistic, adj.
See also: Trade

monopsony

A market in which there are multiple suppliers but only one buyer.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monopsony - (economics) a market in which goods or services are offered by several sellers but there is only one buyer
market, marketplace, market place - the world of commercial activity where goods and services are bought and sold; "without competition there would be no market"; "they were driven from the marketplace"
economic science, economics, political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
Translations

monopsony

[məˈnɒpsənɪ] Nmonopsonio m
References in periodicals archive ?
302) As is generally the case with monopsonies, the supplier is exposed to a significant risk that it cannot extract the fair value of its contribution to the service.
There are very few actual unregulated large monopolies or monopsonies in the United States.
One caveat to this assumption is that in the presence of labor market imperfections such as monopsonies, minimum-wage increases may force employers to internalize the negative employment externality caused by their labor market power.