monosyllabicity

monosyllabicity

(ˌmɒnəʊˌsɪləˈbɪsɪtɪ)
n
(Linguistics) another name for monosyllabism
References in periodicals archive ?
The idea of monosyllabicity still influenced Junius when he drew up his lists of 'Monosyllaba' for the Observationes in Willerami.
Given the strong tendency towards monosyllabicity, phonological words are best appreciated along a vertical dimension or axis, with simultaneous articulatory interaction at multiple levels.
but even monosyllabicity is achieved (see Emmorey 2002: 20).
a single movement is considered by many researchers to define a syllable, and has been argued to be the optimal prosodic form of a word" (2006: 7, see also Sandler 1999), the above example can be considered as a particularly clear example that the syntactic process of cliticization operates within the prosodic domain of the phonological word and results in an optimal form, in the sense of monosyllabicity.
While coalescence relates to the monosyllabicity constraint, assimilation relates to the selected finger constraint.
Therefore it is interesting to see through what mechanisms such overshooting is reduced and the limit of two syllables or even monosyllabicity is retained.