monotheism

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mon·o·the·ism

 (mŏn′ə-thē-ĭz′əm)
n.
The doctrine or belief that there is only one God.

mon′o·the′ist n.
mon′o·the·is′tic adj.
mon′o·the·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

monotheism

(ˈmɒnəʊθɪˌɪzəm)
n
(Theology) the belief or doctrine that there is only one God
ˈmonoˌtheist n, adj
ˌmonotheˈistic adj
ˌmonotheˈistically adv

mon•o•the•ism

(ˈmɒn ə θiˌɪz əm)

n.
the doctrine or belief that there is only one God.
[1650–60; mono- + (poly) theism]
mon′o•the`ist, n., adj.
mon`o•the•is′tic, adj.
mon`o•the•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

monotheism

the doctrine of or belief in only one God. — monotheist, n.
See also: God and Gods
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monotheism - belief in a single Godmonotheism - belief in a single God    
theism - the doctrine or belief in the existence of a God or gods
Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud
Mohammedanism, Muhammadanism, Muslimism, Islam, Islamism - the monotheistic religious system of Muslims founded in Arabia in the 7th century and based on the teachings of Muhammad as laid down in the Koran; "Islam is a complete way of life, not a Sunday religion"; "the term Muhammadanism is offensive to Muslims who believe that Allah, not Muhammad, founded their religion"
polytheism - belief in multiple Gods
Translations
monoteism
monoteismi
jednoboštvomonoteizam
egyistenhitmonoteizmus
eingyðistrú
jedynobóstwomonoteizm
monoteism
monoteizem
monoteism

monotheism

[ˈmɒnəʊˌθiːɪzəm] Nmonoteísmo m

monotheism

[ˈmɒnəʊθɪˌɪzm] nmonoteismo
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a mindset, finely probed by Lieb, in which emotive extremes are evidence not of moral vacillation but rather of the awesome power that inheres in a monotheistically imagined deity.
Any religion centered on a God who is both all-powerful and all-good, including Islam and the more monotheistically inclined versions of Hinduism, should be subject to a thorough post-tsunami evaluation.
Because modem American society, and the modem mind, is monotheistically structured, Twerski observes, people have two options, to accept their ultimate powerlessness in the face of an almighty God or to have "a godlike delusion" and project the self as the almighty, all-consuming power.