monstruous

monstruous

(ˈmɒnstrʊəs)
adj
another word for monstrous
References in periodicals archive ?
inked top pitching free agent Zack Greinke to a monstruous 6-year, $147 million deal last week.
In his article, Rummo gave an example about destroying books in Nazi Germany and China as "a monstruous form of ideological struggle" and compared 'killing' books with killing people.
These seeming beasts are men indeed, Whom this Enchauntress hath trans formed thus, Whylome her louers, \vhich her lusts did feed, Now turned into figures hideous, According to their minds like monstruous.
David shows the scene as one of heroism and valour; for Picasso as for Poussin--it is a monument to the monstruous cruelty that is the reality of war.
Her neather partes misshapen, monstruous, Were hidd in water, that I could not see, But they did seeme more foule and hideous, Then womans shape man would beleeue to bee (I.
In his Tablas poeticas (1617), Francisco de Cascales notoriously called the contemporary Spanish plays hermafroditos and monstruous de la poesia, indicating that they were neither tragedies nor comedies in the Aristotelian sense, but a mixture of both dramatic genres.
It has been speculated that the universal symmetries of string theory [108] may be linked to Borcherds Vertex operator algebras (the Monstruous moonshine) that underline the deep interplay between Conformal Field Theories and Number theory.
He speculates that these editors were perhaps swayed by the propriety of the monstruous offspring being "prodigiously and unnaturally mothered" (44), but he also points to Prospero's elaborate birthing metaphor in his account to Miranda in act 1, scene 2 of their preservation and to Prospero's utterance in act 5, scene 1 of lines taken from Ovid's Medea--other examples of what has traditionally been seen as a female realm being appropriated by the male, in a plot which Goldberg identifies as "masculinist.
Here, by a dramatic contrast which one may call monstruous, the supernatural is far more forcibly put before us than by all the glories and the visions of the other painters.
Her description of the family as monstruous garden gnomes and her friends as social misfits defies understanding.
Her sculptures in the form of bloated, twisted and almost monstruous torsoes, dismembered and, at times, enchained, not only reveal an artistic mastery that results from a quarter-century-long study of anatomy, but also betray a characteristically contemporary obsession with the anguish of the human condition and the deformation of twentieth century values.