mood disorder

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Related to Mood disorders: Anxiety disorders, Personality disorders

mood disorder

n.
Any of a group of psychiatric disorders, including depression and bipolar disorder, characterized by a pervasive disturbance of mood. Also called affective disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
MoodNetwork aims to bring together 50,000 participants who have experienced mood disorders, and their friends and families, to collaborate with researchers and clinicians.
The crippling effects of both kinds of mood disorders are described accurately, and the process of getting help through hospitalization, evaluation, proper medication, therapy and treatment is explained.
This statement makes recommendations to consider these mood disorders as independent, moderate risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and is based on a group of recent scientific studies including those that reported cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks and deaths among young people.
The work has implications for researchers and clinicians involved with identifying new targets to treat mood disorders, according to David Fleck, Ph.
Mood disorders are points on a spectrum, not completely separate, according to a large, new study.
According to Yale researcher Jadon Webb and his colleagues, among those with mental illnesses, people with psychotic disorders like schizophrenia are much more likely to be left-handed than those with mood disorders like depression or bipolar syndrome.
I'm president of Mind, and the whole point in my role, as I see it, is not to be shy and forthcoming about the morbidity and genuine nature of the likelihood of death amongst people with certain mood disorders.
The book provides an in-depth discussion of each and explores vital topics including mood disorders and: disclosure; dating; looking one way while feeling another; impact on family; intimacy; employment and career; treatment options; spirituality; children and seniors; the connection between chronic pain and depression; thriving; despite a mood disorder the “worry window”; how to help someone with a mood disorder; the military; and mind-body medicine.
Even the increasing incidence of certain mood disorders such as depression or bipolar, has been partly attributed to negative changes in diet.
PREMATURE and small babies are more than three times more likely to suffer from anxiety and mood disorders in adolescence, according to University of Birmingham psychologists.
JAPAN will follow Wales' lead and set up a network of researchers to investigate the causes of mood disorders.