moody


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mood·y

 (mo͞o′dē)
adj. mood·i·er, mood·i·est
1. Given to frequent changes of mood; temperamental.
2. Subject to periods of depression; sulky.
3. Expressive of a mood, especially a sullen or gloomy mood: a moody silence.

mood′i·ly adv.
mood′i·ness n.

moody

(ˈmuːdɪ)
adj, moodier or moodiest
1. sullen, sulky, or gloomy
2. temperamental or changeable
ˈmoodily adv
ˈmoodiness n

Moody

(ˈmuːdɪ)
n
(Biography) Dwight Lyman. 1837–99, US evangelist and hymnodist, noted for his revivalist campaigns in Britain and the US with I. D. Sankey

mood•y

(ˈmu di)

adj. mood•i•er, mood•i•est.
1. given to moods, esp. gloomy or sullen moods.
2. expressing such a mood: a moody silence.
[before 900; Middle English mody, Old English mōdig]
mood′i•ly, adv.
mood′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moody - United States tennis player who dominated women's tennis in the 1920s and 1930s (1905-1998)Moody - United States tennis player who dominated women's tennis in the 1920s and 1930s (1905-1998)
2.moody - United States evangelist (1837-1899)Moody - United States evangelist (1837-1899)
Adj.1.moody - showing a brooding ill humor; "a dark scowl"; "the proverbially dour New England Puritan"; "a glum, hopeless shrug"; "he sat in moody silence"; "a morose and unsociable manner"; "a saturnine, almost misanthropic young genius"- Bruce Bliven; "a sour temper"; "a sullen crowd"
ill-natured - having an irritable and unpleasant disposition
2.moody - subject to sharply varying moods; "a temperamental opera singer"
emotional - of more than usual emotion; "his behavior was highly emotional"

moody

adjective
4. sad, gloomy, melancholy, sombre melancholy guitars and moody lyrics

moody

adjective
1. Given to changeable emotional states, especially of anger or gloom:
2. Broodingly and sullenly unhappy:
Translations
مُتَقَلِبُ الْـمِزَاجِمُكْتَئِب، مُتَقَلِّب المِزاج
náladovýmrzutý
irritabelnedtrykt
pahantuulinen
zlovoljan
hangulat-változó kedélyállapotú
önugur
むっつりした
침울한
čemeren
nyckfull
หงุดหงิด
thất thường

moody

[ˈmuːdɪ] ADJ (moodier (compar) (moodiest (superl))) (= variable) → (de carácter) variable, temperamental; (= bad-tempered) → malhumorado
he's very moodyes muy temperamental, es de humor muy variable

moody

[ˈmuːdi] adj
(= variable) → d'humeur changeante
(= sullen) → morose, maussade
(= atmospheric) [picture, music, lyric] → morose

moody

adj (+er)launisch, launenhaft; (= bad-tempered)schlecht gelaunt; look, answerverdrossen, übellaunig; picture, film, piece of musicstimmungsvoll

moody

[ˈmuːdɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (variable) → lunatico/a, capriccioso/a; (morose) → imbronciato/a, intrattabile

mood

(muːd) noun
the state of a person's feelings, temper, mind etc at a particular time. What kind of mood is she in?; I'm in a bad mood today.
ˈmoody adjective
often bad-tempered. a moody child.
ˈmoodily adverb
ˈmoodiness noun

moody

مُتَقَلِبُ الْـمِزَاجِ náladový nedtrykt launisch κακόκεφος malhumorado pahantuulinen lunatique zlovoljan volubile むっつりした 침울한 humeurig lunefull ponury mal-humorado унылый nyckfull หงุดหงิด huysuz thất thường 喜怒无常的

moody

a. malhumorado-a; propenso-a a cambios de ánimo.
References in classic literature ?
At half-past ten, Tom Moody, Sir Huddlestone Fuddlestone's huntsman, was seen trotting up the avenue, followed by the noble pack of hounds in a compact body-- the rear being brought up by the two whips clad in stained scarlet frocks--light hard-featured lads on well-bred lean horses, possessing marvellous dexterity in casting the points of their long heavy whips at the thinnest part of any dog's skin who dares to straggle from the main body, or to take the slightest notice, or even so much as wink, at the hares and rabbits starting under their noses.
Tom Moody rides up to the door of the Hall, where he is welcomed by the butler, who offers him drink, which he declines.
Then they collect round the pack in the corner and talk with Tom Moody of past sport, and the merits of Sniveller and Diamond, and of the state of the country and of the wretched breed of foxes.
The Reverend Bute Crawley (who has been too modest to appear at the public meet before his nephew's windows), whom Tom Moody remembers forty years back a slender divine riding the wildest horses, jumping the widest brooks, and larking over the newest gates in the country-- his Reverence, we say, happens to trot out from the Rectory Lane on his powerful black horse just as Sir Huddlestone passes; he joins the worthy Baronet.
Pris and Stella and Gilbert were there, Charlie Sloane, looking more important than ever a Sophomore looked before, Phil, with the Alec-and-Alonzo question still unsettled, and Moody Spurgeon MacPherson.
Finally, Charlie Sloane fought Moody Spurgeon MacPherson, because Moody Spurgeon had said that Anne Shirley put on airs about her recitations, and Moody Spurgeon was "licked"; consequently Moody Spurgeon's sister, Ella May, would not "speak" to Anne Shirley all the rest of the winter.
Freshman tailback Emmanuel Moody broke free on a run, and in a practice tradition, was supposed to run all the way to the end zone without any defensive players following him.
Readers seeking a critical biography of Dwight Lyman Moody will not be satisfied with this new work.
When Curtis Moody, a licensed architect and owner of Moody/Nolan Ltd.