moon

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moon

 (mo͞on)
n.
1. often Moon The natural satellite of Earth, visible by reflection of sunlight and having a slightly elliptical orbit, approximately 363,100 kilometers (225,600 miles) distant at perigee and 405,700 kilometers (252,100 miles) at apogee. Its mean diameter is 3,475 kilometers (2,159 miles), its mass approximately one eightieth that of Earth, and its average period of revolution around Earth 29 days 12 hours 44 minutes calculated with respect to the sun.
2. A natural satellite revolving around a planet.
3. The moon as it appears at a particular time in its cycle of phases: a gibbous moon.
4. A month, especially a lunar month.
5. A disk, globe, or crescent resembling the natural satellite of Earth.
6. Moonlight.
7. Something unreasonable or unattainable: They acted as if we were asking for the moon.
8. Slang The bared buttocks.
v. mooned, moon·ing, moons
v.intr.
1. To wander about or pass time languidly and aimlessly.
2. To yearn or pine as if infatuated.
3. Slang To expose one's buttocks in public as a prank or disrespectful gesture.
v.tr.
Slang To expose one's buttocks to (others) as a prank or disrespectful gesture: "threatened to moon a passing ... camera crew" (Vanity Fair).
Idiom:
over the moon
In a state of great happiness.

[Middle English mone, from Old English mōna; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

moon

(muːn)
n
1. (Astronomy) (sometimes capital) the natural satellite of the earth. Diameter: 3476 km; mass: 7.35 × 1022 kg; mean distance from earth: 384 400 km; periods of rotation and revolution: 27.32 days.
2. (Astronomy) the face of the moon as it is seen during its revolution around the earth, esp at one of its phases: new moon; full moon.
3. (Astronomy) any natural satellite of a planet
4. (Astronomy) moonlight; moonshine
5. something resembling a moon
6. (Astronomy) a month, esp a lunar one
7. once in a blue moon very seldom
8. over the moon informal extremely happy; ecstatic
9. reach for the moon to desire or attempt something unattainable or difficult to obtain
vb
10. (when: tr, often foll by away; when intr, often foll by around) to be idle in a listless way, as if in love, or to idle (time) away
11. (intr) slang to expose one's buttocks to passers-by
[Old English mōna; compare Old Frisian mōna, Old High German māno]
ˈmoonless adj

Moon

(muːn)
n
(Linguistics) a system of embossed alphabetical signs for blind readers, the fourteen basic characters of which can, by rotation, mimic most of the letters of the Roman alphabet, thereby making learning easier for those who learned to read before going blind. Compare Braille1

Moon

(muːn)
n
(Biography) William. 1818–94, British inventor of the Moon writing system in 1847, who, himself blind, taught blind children in Brighton and printed mainly religious works from stereotyped plates of his own designing

moon

(mun)

n.
1. the earth's natural satellite, orbiting the earth at a mean distance of 238,857 miles (384,393 km) and having a diameter of 2160 miles (3476 km).
2. this body during a particular lunar month, or during a certain period of time, or at a certain point of time, regarded as a distinct object or entity.
3. a lunar month, or, in general, a month.
4. any planetary satellite: the moons of Jupiter.
5. something shaped like an orb or a crescent.
v.i.
7. to act or wander abstractedly, listlessly, or dreamily: to moon about all day.
8. to sentimentalize or remember nostalgically.
9. Slang. to expose one's buttocks suddenly and publicly as a prank or gesture of disrespect.
v.t.
10. to spend (time) idly: to moon the afternoon away.
[before 900; Middle English mone, Old English mōna; c. Old Frisian mōna, Old Saxon, Old High German māno, Old Norse māni, Gothic mena; akin to Latin mēnsis month, Greek mḗnē moon, mēn month, Skt māsa moon, month]
moon′er, n.
moon′less, adj.
click for a larger image
moon
Half of the moon is always in sunlight, as seen on the left. The relative positions of Earth, the moon, and the sun determine how much of the lighted half can be seen from Earth, as seen on the right. These forms in which the moon appears are known as phases.

moon

(mo͞on)
1. Often Moon The natural satellite of Earth, visible by reflection of sunlight and traveling around Earth in a slightly elliptical orbit at an average distance of about 237,000 miles (381,500 kilometers). The moon's average diameter is 2,160 miles (3,475 kilometers), and its mass is about 1/80 that of Earth.
2. A natural satellite revolving around a planet: the moons of Jupiter.
3. The moon as it appears at a particular time in its cycle of phases: a half moon.
Did You Know? We earthlings usually think of our moon as the moon, but any planet's natural satellites are properly called moons. Jupiter has at least 28 moons, while Saturn has 30, and additional small ones around these and other planets may yet be discovered. Earth's moon is also not necessarily typical of other moons in the solar system. No water exists on our moon, but some scientists think that one of Jupiter's moons, Europa, may have liquid water that might support life under a thick layer of ice. Titan, a moon of Saturn, is also thought to have an environment that can support primitive life: an ocean of ethane instead of water. Earth's moon is also very quiet, geologically. By comparison, Io, another of Jupiter's moons, is a violent cauldron of geologic activity. It is covered with huge volcanoes that emit plumes of sulfur so enormous that they can be seen by the Hubble Space Telescope orbiting Earth.

Moon

See also astronomy; planets; sun.

the branch of astronomy that deals with the charting of the moon’s surface. — selenographer, selenographist, n. — selenographic, selenographical, adj.
the worship of the moon.
the branch of astronomy that studies the physical characteristics of the moon. — selenologist, n. — selenological, adj.
a form of divination involving observation of the moon.

Moon

 
  1. A bright moon … like glistening silk —Amy Lowell
  2. Curled moon … like a feather —Dante Gabriel Rossetti
  3. Everything has in fact another side to it, like the moon —G. K. Chesterton
  4. A full new-risen moon like a pale medallion —Hayden Carruth
  5. The moon had lost all its brilliance and looked like a little cloud in the sky —Leo Tolstoy
  6. A half moon sailing like a moth up the drained blue sky —Jilly Cooper
  7. It looked like a ball of paper from the back pocket of jeans that have just come out of the washing machine, which only time and ironing would tell if it was an old shopping list or a five pound note —Douglas Adams
  8. Bright moonlight lay against its [house] wall like a fresh coat of paint —Raymond Chandler
  9. A little slice of moon, curved like a canoe —Helen Hudson
  10. The moon as beautiful as a great camellia —Max Beerbohm
  11. A moonbeam … shimmers bright as a needle —W. P. Kinsella
  12. Moon, bright as a lemon —Tom Robbins
  13. The moon burned like metal —Pat Conroy
  14. The moon, but half disclosed, was cut off as by a shutter —Joyce Cary
  15. Moon curved like a rocker —Helen Hudson
  16. The moon floats belly up like a dead goldfish —Marge Piercy
  17. The moon follows the sun like a French translation of a Russian poet —Wallace Stevens
  18. The moon hangs like a neon scythe over the countryside —W. P. Kinsella
  19. The moon hung above the yard like a cheap earring —Isaac Babel
  20. The moon hung like a pale lamp above the rim of the bay —William Styron
  21. The moon is hidden by a silver cloud, fair as a halo —Christina Rossetti
  22. The moon … is like a cake of white soap —John Phillips
  23. The moon leaned low against the sky like a white-faced clown lolling against a circus wall —W. Somerset Maugham
  24. Moonlight drilling in through the window like a bit into coal —Richard Wertime
  25. Moonlight … dripped down like oil —Bernard Malamud
  26. The moonlight invaded the courtyard, until it looked like a field of untrodden snow —Stefan Zweig
  27. Moonlight so white that it looked like snow —Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
  28. A moon like a fallen fruit reversing gravity was hoisting itself above the rooftop —Ross Macdonald
  29. The moon like a flower in heaven’s high bower, with silent delight sits and smiles on the night —William Blake
  30. Moon like a monstrous crystal —G. K. Chesterton
  31. The moon, like an eye turned up in a trance, filmed over and seemed to turn loose from its track and to float sightless —Eudora Welty
  32. Moon … like a red-faced farmer —T. E. Hulme

    The complete line as it appears in a poem entitled Autumn: “I walked abroad and saw the ruddy moon lean over the hedge like a red-faced farmer.”

  33. The moon like a white rose shone —W. B. Yeats
  34. Moon like the moving dot on sing-along lyrics —Sharon Sheehe Stark
  35. The moon looked like the head of a golden bollard in a Venice lagoon —John Gunther
  36. The moon, narrow and pale like a paring snipped from a snowman’s toenail —Tom Robbins
  37. The moon overhead tore through fierce cloud-wrack like a battered ship —Phyllis Bottome
  38. Moon … pale, full-blown as a flower —Elizabeth Spencer
  39. Moon pitted with holes, like an old brass coin —Erich Maria Remarque
  40. The moon rattles like a fragment of angry candy —E. E. Cummings
  41. The moon rises like a fat white god —Diane Ackerman
  42. The moon … rode bonily in the sky, looking stark and abandoned like a decoration kids had put up for Halloween and forgotten to take down —William Dieter
  43. The moon sails up out of the ocean dripping like a just washed apple —Marge Piercy
  44. The moon shines like a lost button —Derek Walcott
  45. The moon shone out like day —Nathanial Hawthorne
  46. Moon slightly more than half full, like a tipped bowl —Patricia Henley
  47. The moon stood like an arc lamp over the roofs of the houses —Erich Maria Remarque
  48. The moon stuck like a wafer in the evening sky —Anon
  49. The moon swelled like a plum —Philip Levine
  50. Moon … waning, like silver that is polished so thin that it has begun to wear away —Mary Stewart
  51. The moon … was like a slender shaving thrown up from a bar of gold —Joseph Conrad
  52. The moon was like a chip of ice —Wallace Stegner
  53. The moon was like a sickle —Edward Hoagland
  54. The moon was out, cold and faraway as an owl’s hoot —John Braine
  55. The moon … was slowly drifting into an immense, dark and transparent hole like a lake with its depth full of stars —Andre Malraux
  56. A pale crescent moon shaped like a woman’s earring —Katharine Haake
  57. A pale moon, like a claw (looked down through the claw-like branches of dead trees) —Jean Rhys
  58. Quiet moonlight lay like the smile upon a dreaming face —John Hall Wheelock
  59. The rising moon … winding like a silver thread until it was lost in the stars —Bret Harte
  60. Sometimes in the afternoon sky a white moon would creep up like a little cloud, without display, suggesting an actress who does not have to “Come on” for a while and so goes “In front” in her ordinary clothes —Marcel Proust
  61. The sphere hanging in the not yet darkened sky seemed like a lamp they had forgotten to turn off in the morning (a lamp that had burned all day in the room of the dead) —Milan Kundera
  62. A stream of moonlight cut through the mist and hit the black water, like ink —Paige Mitchell
  63. A thin moon … gray and marbled like a worn shell —Alice McDermott
  64. A yellow moon rose like a flower blooming —Bernard Malamud

moon


Past participle: mooned
Gerund: mooning

Imperative
moon
moon
Present
I moon
you moon
he/she/it moons
we moon
you moon
they moon
Preterite
I mooned
you mooned
he/she/it mooned
we mooned
you mooned
they mooned
Present Continuous
I am mooning
you are mooning
he/she/it is mooning
we are mooning
you are mooning
they are mooning
Present Perfect
I have mooned
you have mooned
he/she/it has mooned
we have mooned
you have mooned
they have mooned
Past Continuous
I was mooning
you were mooning
he/she/it was mooning
we were mooning
you were mooning
they were mooning
Past Perfect
I had mooned
you had mooned
he/she/it had mooned
we had mooned
you had mooned
they had mooned
Future
I will moon
you will moon
he/she/it will moon
we will moon
you will moon
they will moon
Future Perfect
I will have mooned
you will have mooned
he/she/it will have mooned
we will have mooned
you will have mooned
they will have mooned
Future Continuous
I will be mooning
you will be mooning
he/she/it will be mooning
we will be mooning
you will be mooning
they will be mooning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been mooning
you have been mooning
he/she/it has been mooning
we have been mooning
you have been mooning
they have been mooning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been mooning
you will have been mooning
he/she/it will have been mooning
we will have been mooning
you will have been mooning
they will have been mooning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been mooning
you had been mooning
he/she/it had been mooning
we had been mooning
you had been mooning
they had been mooning
Conditional
I would moon
you would moon
he/she/it would moon
we would moon
you would moon
they would moon
Past Conditional
I would have mooned
you would have mooned
he/she/it would have mooned
we would have mooned
you would have mooned
they would have mooned
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moon - the natural satellite of the Earth; "the average distance to the Moon is 384,400 kilometers"; "men first stepped on the moon in 1969"
2.moon - any object resembling a moon; "he made a moon lamp that he used as a night light"; "the clock had a moon that showed various phases"
object, physical object - a tangible and visible entity; an entity that can cast a shadow; "it was full of rackets, balls and other objects"
3.moon - the period between successive new moons (29.531 days)
lunar year - a period of 12 lunar months
month - a time unit of approximately 30 days; "he was given a month to pay the bill"
4.moon - the light of the MoonMoon - the light of the Moon; "moonlight is the smuggler's enemy"; "the Moon was bright enough to read by"
light, visible light, visible radiation - (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation; "the light was filtered through a soft glass window"
moon ray, moonbeam, moon-ray - a ray of moonlight
5.Moon - United States religious leader (born in Korea) who founded the Unification Church in 1954; was found guilty of conspiracy to evade taxes (born in 1920)
6.moon - any natural satellite of a planetmoon - any natural satellite of a planet; "Jupiter has sixteen moons"
satellite - any celestial body orbiting around a planet or star
Verb1.moon - have dreamlike musings or fantasies while awake; "She looked out the window, daydreaming"
laze, slug, idle, stagnate - be idle; exist in a changeless situation; "The old man sat and stagnated on his porch"; "He slugged in bed all morning"
2.moon - be idle in a listless or dreamy way
laze, slug, idle, stagnate - be idle; exist in a changeless situation; "The old man sat and stagnated on his porch"; "He slugged in bed all morning"
3.moon - expose one's buttocks to; "moon the audience"
display, exhibit, expose - to show, make visible or apparent; "The Metropolitan Museum is exhibiting Goya's works this month"; "Why don't you show your nice legs and wear shorter skirts?"; "National leaders will have to display the highest skills of statesmanship"

moon

noun
1. satellite Neptune's large moon
verb
1. idle, drift, loaf, languish, waste time, daydream, mope, mooch (Brit. slang), doss (Brit. slang) She was mooning around all morning, doing nothing.
many moons ago a long time ago, years ago, ages ago, donkey's years ago (Brit. informal), yonks ago (Brit. informal) I saw her once, many moons ago, in a dreadful movie.
once in a blue moon rarely, almost never, very seldom, hardly ever, scarcely ever Once in a blue moon you get some problems.
Related words
adjective lunar
Quotations
"Swear not by the moon, the inconstant moon" [William Shakespeare Romeo and Juliet]
Translations
maan
قمرقَمَرقَمَرٌقَمَر يَدور حَوْلَ كَوْكَب
луна
lluna
měsíc
månemånedMånen
luno
kuu
ماهمه
Kuukuukausihaikailla
चन्द्रमा
mjesec
holdhónap
luna
bulanrembulan
mánitungltungl, fylgihnötturtungl, máni
luna
mėnulispapildomai uždarbiautipapildomas uždarbiavimasvaikščioti lyg apspangusbe mėnulio
mēnesspavadonis
ചന്ദ്രന്‍
lună
mesiac
LunaMesec
месец
månemoona
mwezi
ดวงจันทร์พระจันทร์
ɔbosome
місяць
چاند
mặt trăng

moon

[muːn]
A. Nluna f
full moonluna f llena
there's a full moon tonightesta noche hay luna llena
new moonluna f nueva
there was no moonno había luna
by the light of the moona la luz de la luna
many moons ago (liter or hum) → hace mucho tiempo
to ask for the moonpedir la luna
once in a blue moonde Pascuas a Ramos
to be over the moonestar loco de contento, estar en el séptimo cielo
to promise the moonprometer la luna or el oro y el moro
see also phase A2
B. VIenseñar el culo
C. CPD moon buggy Nvehículo m lunar
moon landing Nalunizaje m
moon about moon around VI + ADVmirar a las musarañas
moon over VI + PREP she was mooning over the photomiraba amorosamente la foto, contemplaba extasiada la foto

moon

[ˈmuːn] nlune f
There's a full moon tonight → Il y a pleine lune ce soir.
on the moon → sur la Lune
to be over the moon → être aux anges
once in a blue moon (= very occasionally) → une fois tous les trente-six du mois
moon around
vimusarder
vt fus [+ place] → flâner dans
She mooned around the grounds of the castle → Elle flânait dans le parc du château.

moon

nMond m; is there a moon tonight?scheint heute der Mond?; when the moon is fullbei Vollmond; the man in the moonder Mann im Mond; you’re asking for the moon!du verlangst Unmögliches!; to promise somebody the moonjdm das Blaue vom Himmel versprechen; to be over the moon (inf)überglücklich sein
vi
(= mope) (→ vor sich acchin) → träumen
(inf, with backside) → seinen nackten Hintern herausstrecken

moon

in cpdsMond-;
moonbeam
nMondstrahl m
moon blindness
n
(Vet) → Mondblindheit f
(Med) → Nachtblindheit f
moonboots
plMoonboots pl
moonbuggy
nMondauto or -fahrzeug nt
mooncalf
n (dated)Schwachsinnige(r) mf; (inf)Mondkalb nt
moon-faced
adjmit einem Mondgesicht, mondgesichtig

moon

:
moon landing
nMondlandung f
moonless
adj nightmondlos
moonlight
nMondlicht ntor -schein m; it was moonder Mond schien; a moon walkein Mondscheinspaziergang m ? flit
vi (inf)schwarzarbeiten
moonlighter
n (inf)Schwarzarbeiter(in) m(f)
moonlighting
n (inf)Schwarzarbeit f
moonlit
adj objectmondbeschienen; night, landscape, lawnmondhell
moonscape
moonshine
n
(= moonlight)Mondschein m
(inf: = nonsense) → Unsinn m
(inf: = illegal whisky) illegal gebrannter Whisky
moonshiner
n (inf)Schwarzbrenner(in) m(f)
moonshot
nMondflug m
moonstone
nMondstein m
moonstruck
adj (= mad)mondsüchtig; (fig)vernarrt

moon

[muːn] nluna
full/new moon → luna piena/nuova
by the light of the moon → al chiaro di luna
once in a blue moon → a ogni morte di papa
to be over the moon (fam) → essere al settimo cielo
moon about moon around vi + advaggirarsi con aria trasognata
moon over vi + prep to moon over sbsospirare per qn

moon

(muːn) noun
1. the heavenly body that moves once round the earth in a month and reflects light from the sun. The moon was shining brightly; Spacemen landed on the moon.
2. any of the similar bodies moving round the other planets. the moons of Jupiter.
ˈmoonless adjective
(of a night) dark and having no moonlight.
ˈmoonbeam noun
a beam of light reflected from the moon.
ˈmoonlight noun, adjective
(made with the help of) the light reflected by the moon. The sea looked silver in the moonlight; a moonlight raid.
verb
to work at a second job, often at night, in addition to one's regular job. He earns so little that he has to moonlight.
moonlighting noun
ˈmoonlit adjective
lit by the moon. a moonlit hillside.
moon about/around
to wander around as if dazed, eg because one is in love.

moon

قَمَرٌ Měsíc måne Mond φεγγάρι luna kuu lune mjesec luna maan måne księżyc lua луна måne พระจันทร์ ay mặt trăng 月亮

moon

n. luna;
moonlightluz de la ___.
References in classic literature ?
Yet in the London streets, so crowded with people and so brilliantly lighted in the dusk of evening, there were depressing hints of reproaches for that I had put the poor old kitchen at home so far away; and in the dead of night, the footsteps of some incapable impostor of a porter mooning about Barnard's Inn, under pretence of watching it, fell hollow on my heart.
Never have I been much of a ladies' man, being more concerned with fighting and kindred arts which have ever seemed to me more befitting a man than mooning over a scented glove four sizes too small for him, or kissing a dead flower that has begun to smell like a cabbage.
What do YOU think of when you go mooning about alone?