moonlighting


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moon·light

 (mo͞on′līt′)
n.
The light reflected from the surface of the moon.
intr.v. moon·light·ed, moon·light·ing, moon·lights Informal
To work at another job, often at night, in addition to one's full-time job.

moon′light′er n.

moonlighting

(ˈmuːnˌlaɪtɪŋ)
n
1. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) working at a secondary job
2. (Historical Terms) (in 19th-century Ireland) the carrying out of cattle-maiming, murders, etc, during the night in protest against the land-tenure system
Translations
العَمَل في وَظيفَةٍ ثانِيَه
měsíční svit
másodállás
fuškárenie
gece ikinci bir işte çalışma

moonlighting

[ˈmuːnˌlaɪtɪŋ] Npluriempleo m

moonlighting

[ˈmuːnlaɪtɪŋ] ntravail m d'appoint au noir

moonlighting

[ˈmuːnˌlaɪtɪŋ] nlavoro nero

moon

(muːn) noun
1. the heavenly body that moves once round the earth in a month and reflects light from the sun. The moon was shining brightly; Spacemen landed on the moon.
2. any of the similar bodies moving round the other planets. the moons of Jupiter.
ˈmoonless adjective
(of a night) dark and having no moonlight.
ˈmoonbeam noun
a beam of light reflected from the moon.
ˈmoonlight noun, adjective
(made with the help of) the light reflected by the moon. The sea looked silver in the moonlight; a moonlight raid.
verb
to work at a second job, often at night, in addition to one's regular job. He earns so little that he has to moonlight.
moonlighting noun
ˈmoonlit adjective
lit by the moon. a moonlit hillside.
moon about/around
to wander around as if dazed, eg because one is in love.
References in periodicals archive ?
15, 2015 /PRNewswire/ --The McClatchy Company (NYSE: MNI) announced today the rollout of the Moonlighting digital job exchange on all of McClatchy's newspaper websites and mobile apps.
The incidence of moonlighting shows important patterns across demographic groups.
From a graphical analysis of national time-series moonlighting data during the 1960s and 1970s, Stinson (1987) finds evidence of large increases in moonlighting during expansionary periods.
IN the days before Bruce Willis was a big screen action hero, he made his name as Cybill Shepherd's wisecracking sidekick in the 1980s romantic comedy series Moonlighting.
Dubai: Many people have resorted to moonlighting to pay their bills as galloping inflation and hike in prices of essentials are hitting the pocket hard.
EXHAUSTED nurses are putting lives at risk and costing the NHS pounds 800million a year by moonlighting as temps, says a new study.
With such potential effects, it stands to reason that organization researchers can develop more useful models if they consider the impact of moonlighting on the constructs and relationships they are studying.
Click on 'moonlighting' in the paragraph about his early work at Adler and Sullivan, you are transported to an Amazon book Moonlighting for Fun and Profit: How to Keep your Day Job While Earning Extra Income.
Answer: Employer policies that prohibit moonlighting do raise some issues of privacy, fairness, and even discrimination, but in general, the courts have upheld no-moonlighting rules when they are applied uniformly and supported by some business justification.
MOONLIGHTING MPs who double their salary with jobs outside the Commons face a tough new crackdown.
NINE police officers have been punished for moonlighting as chauffeurs.
A SUN-STARVED Scottish strawberry farmer is moonlighting as a guinea pig for supermarket bosses.