moor


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Related to moor: Moor religion

Moor

 (mo͝or)
n.
1. A member of a traditionally Muslim people of mixed Berber and Arab ancestry, now living chiefly in northwest Africa.
2. One of the Muslims who invaded Spain in the 8th century and established a civilization in Andalusia that lasted until the late 15th century.

[Middle English More, from Old French, from Medieval Latin Mōrus, from Latin Maurus, Mauritanian, from Greek Mauros.]

moor 1

 (mo͝or)
v. moored, moor·ing, moors
v.tr.
1. To make fast (a vessel, for example) by means of cables, anchors, or lines: moor a ship to a dock; a dirigible moored to a tower.
2. To fix in place; secure: a mailbox moored to the sidewalk with bolts. See Synonyms at fasten.
3. To provide with an abiding emotional attachment: a politician moored to the family back home.
v.intr.
1. To secure a vessel or aircraft with lines or anchors.
2. To be secured with lines or anchors: The freighter moored alongside the wharf.

[Middle English moren.]

moor 2

 (mo͝or)
n.
An uncultivated area covered with low-growing vegetation and often high but poorly drained.

[Middle English mor, from Old English mōr.]

moor

(mʊə; mɔː)
n
(Physical Geography) a tract of unenclosed ground, usually having peaty soil covered with heather, coarse grass, bracken, and moss
[Old English mōr; related to Old Saxon mōr, Old High German muor swamp]
ˈmoory adj

moor

(mʊə; mɔː)
vb
1. (Nautical Terms) to secure (a ship, boat, etc) with cables or ropes
2. (Nautical Terms) (of a ship, boat, etc) to be secured in this way
3. (Nautical Terms) (not in technical usage) a less common word for anchor11
[C15: of Germanic origin; related to Old English mǣrelsrāp rope for mooring]

Moor

(mʊə; mɔː)
n
(Peoples) a member of a Muslim people of North Africa, of mixed Arab and Berber descent. In the 8th century they were converted to Islam and established power in North Africa and Spain, where they established a civilization (756–1492)
[C14: via Old French from Latin Maurus, from Greek Mauros, possibly from Berber]

moor1

(mʊər)

n.
1. a tract of open, peaty wasteland, often overgrown with heath, common in high altitudes where drainage is poor; heath.
2. a tract of land preserved for game.
[before 900; Middle English more, Old English mōr; c. Old Saxon mōr, Middle Dutch moer, Old High German muor, Middle Low German mōr marsh]
moor′y, adj.

moor2

(mʊər)

v.t.
1. to secure (a ship, boat, dirigible, etc.) in a particular place, as by cables and anchors or by lines.
2. to fix firmly; secure.
v.i.
3. to moor a ship, small boat, etc.
4. to be made secure by cables or the like.
[1485–95; akin to Old English mǣrelsrāp rope for mooring a ship; see marline]

Moor

(mʊər)

n.
1. a member of any of the groups of North African Arabs and Berbers who ruled parts of the Iberian Peninsula from the 8th century to 1492.
2. Archaic. any native of North Africa W of Egypt.
[1350–1400; Middle English More < Middle French, variant of Maure < Latin Maurus < Greek Maûros]

moor

- Meaning "tie up a boat," it was probably borrowed from German or Dutch.
See also related terms for tie.

moor


Past participle: moored
Gerund: mooring

Imperative
moor
moor
Present
I moor
you moor
he/she/it moors
we moor
you moor
they moor
Preterite
I moored
you moored
he/she/it moored
we moored
you moored
they moored
Present Continuous
I am mooring
you are mooring
he/she/it is mooring
we are mooring
you are mooring
they are mooring
Present Perfect
I have moored
you have moored
he/she/it has moored
we have moored
you have moored
they have moored
Past Continuous
I was mooring
you were mooring
he/she/it was mooring
we were mooring
you were mooring
they were mooring
Past Perfect
I had moored
you had moored
he/she/it had moored
we had moored
you had moored
they had moored
Future
I will moor
you will moor
he/she/it will moor
we will moor
you will moor
they will moor
Future Perfect
I will have moored
you will have moored
he/she/it will have moored
we will have moored
you will have moored
they will have moored
Future Continuous
I will be mooring
you will be mooring
he/she/it will be mooring
we will be mooring
you will be mooring
they will be mooring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been mooring
you have been mooring
he/she/it has been mooring
we have been mooring
you have been mooring
they have been mooring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been mooring
you will have been mooring
he/she/it will have been mooring
we will have been mooring
you will have been mooring
they will have been mooring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been mooring
you had been mooring
he/she/it had been mooring
we had been mooring
you had been mooring
they had been mooring
Conditional
I would moor
you would moor
he/she/it would moor
we would moor
you would moor
they would moor
Past Conditional
I would have moored
you would have moored
he/she/it would have moored
we would have moored
you would have moored
they would have moored
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moor - one of the Muslim people of north AfricaMoor - one of the Muslim people of north Africa; of mixed Arab and Berber descent; converted to Islam in the 8th century; conqueror of Spain in the 8th century
Moslem, Muslim - a believer in or follower of Islam
2.moor - open land usually with peaty soil covered with heather and bracken and moss
champaign, plain, field - extensive tract of level open land; "they emerged from the woods onto a vast open plain"; "he longed for the fields of his youth"
Verb1.moor - secure in or as if in a berth or dockmoor - secure in or as if in a berth or dock; "tie up the boat"
wharf - moor at a wharf; "The ship was wharfed"
fasten, fix, secure - cause to be firmly attached; "fasten the lock onto the door"; "she fixed her gaze on the man"
2.moor - come into or dock at a wharfmoor - come into or dock at a wharf; "the big ship wharfed in the evening"
dock - come into dock; "the ship docked"
3.moor - secure with cables or ropes; "moor the boat"
fasten, fix, secure - cause to be firmly attached; "fasten the lock onto the door"; "she fixed her gaze on the man"

moor

1
noun moorland, fell (Brit.), heath, muir (Scot.) The small town is high up on the moors.

moor

2
verb tie up, fix, secure, anchor, dock, lash, berth, fasten, make fast She had moored her boat on the right bank of the river.

moor

verb
1. To join one thing to another:
2. To make secure:
Idiom: make fast.
Translations
أرْض سَبْخَهسَبْخَةُيَرْبِطُيَرْبط أو يُرسي السَّفينَه
uvázatvřesovištěpláňslatina
fortøjehedelynghedeankre op
maŭro
maurraba
nummiankkuroidaankkuroituakiinnittääkiinnittää laituriin
pustopoljinasidriti
ingoványlápmocsár
hrjóstrugt mÿrlendi, lyngheiîileggja viî akkeri; festa meî landfestummýri
停泊させる荒野
매어두다황야
noenkurotpietauvottīrelis
slatina
hedförtöja
จอดเรือทุ่งโล่ง
bağlamakbozkırdemirlemekfundalık boş arazi
bỏ neođồng hoang

Moor

[mʊəʳ] Nmoro/a m/f

moor

1 [mʊəʳ] N (esp Brit) → páramo m, brezal m

moor

2 [mʊəʳ]
A. VTamarrar
B. VIechar las amarras

Moor

[ˈmʊər] nMaure (Mauresque)m/f

moor

[ˈmʊər]
nlande f
vt [+ ship] → amarrer
vimouiller

Moor

nMaure m; (old, = black man) → Mohr m

moor

1
n(Hoch)moor nt; (Brit: for game) → Moorjagd f; a walk on the moorsein Spaziergang mübers Moor

moor

2
vtfestmachen, vertäuen; (at permanent moorings) → muren

Moor

[mʊəʳ] nmoro/a

moor

1 [mʊəʳ] n (land) → brughiera

moor

2 [mʊəʳ]
1. vt (ship) → ormeggiare
2. viormeggiarsi, attraccare

moor1

(muə) noun
a large stretch of open, unfarmed land with poor soil often covered with heather, coarse grass etc.
ˈmoorland noun
a stretch of moor.

moor2

(muə) verb
to fasten (a ship etc) by a rope, cable or anchor. We moored (the yacht) in the bay.
ˈmooring noun
the act, or a means, of fastening a ship. The mooring broke.
ˈmoorings noun plural
the place where a ship is anchored or fastened.

moor

سَبْخَةُ, يَرْبِطُ slatina, uvázat fortøje, lynghede Moor, vertäuen προσδένω, χερσότοπος amarrar, páramo kiinnittää laituriin, nummi amarrer, lande pustopoljina, sidriti brughiera, ormeggiare 停泊させる, 荒野 매어두다, 황야 aanmeren, heidegrond fortøye, (lyng)hei przycumować, wrzosowisko atracar, charneca пустошь, швартовать förtöja, hed จอดเรือ, ทุ่งโล่ง bağlamak, bozkır bỏ neo, đồng hoang 停泊, 沼地
References in classic literature ?
So intolerable indeed is it regarded by some, that no cupidity could persuade them to moor alongside of it.
Sir Launcelot met up with old King Agrivance of Ireland unexpectedly last weok over on the moor south of Sir Balmoral le Merveilleuse's hog dasture.
And I may get it as sweet and fresh as the wild honey the bee gathers on the moor.
My landlord halloed for me to stop ere I reached the bottom of the garden, and offered to accompany me across the moor.
The house is six hundred years old and it's on the edge of the moor, and there's near a hundred rooms in it, though most of them's shut up and locked.
And now, without a word of warning from the Ghost, they stood upon a bleak and desert moor, where monstrous masses of rude stone were cast about, as though it were the burial-place of giants; and water spread itself wheresoever it listed, or would have done so, but for the frost that held it prisoner; and nothing grew but moss and furze, and coarse rank grass.
Theerfur 'tan't my intentions to moor Missis Gummidge 'long with them, but to find a Beein' fur her wheer she can fisherate for herself.
It seems Robin's fame attracted more visitants than was consistent with the growth of the heather, upon a moor worth a shilling an acre.
But what he had seen at Perros, what he had heard behind the dressing-room door, his conversation with Christine at the edge of the moor made him suspect some machination which, devilish though it might be, was none the less human.
This usage, with some differences we had with a Moor, made us very desirous of leaving this country, but we were still put off with one pretence or other whenever we asked leave to depart.
I will only tell thee that, either fate being envious of so great a boon placed in my hands by good fortune, or perhaps (and this is more probable) this castle being, as I have already said, enchanted, at the time when I was engaged in the sweetest and most amorous discourse with her, there came, without my seeing or knowing whence it came, a hand attached to some arm of some huge giant, that planted such a cuff on my jaws that I have them all bathed in blood, and then pummelled me in such a way that I am in a worse plight than yesterday when the carriers, on account of Rocinante's misbehaviour, inflicted on us the injury thou knowest of; whence conjecture that there must be some enchanted Moor guarding the treasure of this damsel's beauty, and that it is not for me.
eaves, and so homeward across the moor, there being three