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Related to moored: Marine traffic

moor 1

v. moored, moor·ing, moors
1. To make fast (a vessel, for example) by means of cables, anchors, or lines: moor a ship to a dock; a dirigible moored to a tower.
2. To fix in place; secure: a mailbox moored to the sidewalk with bolts. See Synonyms at fasten.
3. To provide with an abiding emotional attachment: a politician moored to the family back home.
1. To secure a vessel or aircraft with lines or anchors.
2. To be secured with lines or anchors: The freighter moored alongside the wharf.

[Middle English moren.]

moor 2

An uncultivated area covered with low-growing vegetation and often high but poorly drained.

[Middle English mor, from Old English mōr.]


1. A member of a traditionally Muslim people of mixed Berber and Arab ancestry, now living chiefly in northwest Africa.
2. One of the Muslims who invaded Spain in the 8th century and established a civilization in Andalusia that lasted until the late 15th century.

[Middle English More, from Old French, from Medieval Latin Mōrus, from Latin Maurus, Mauritanian, from Greek Mauros.]


Lying with both anchors down or tied to a pier, anchor buoy, or mooring buoy.
References in classic literature ?
The wharves stretched out towards the centre of the harbor, and, in this inclement weather, were deserted by the ordinary throng of merchants, laborers, and sea-faring men; each wharf a solitude, with the vessels moored stem and stern, along its misty length.
My acquaintance with sheets of water was small, and the pool of Bly, at all events on the few occasions of my consenting, under the protection of my pupils, to affront its surface in the old flat-bottomed boat moored there for our use, had impressed me both with its extent and its agitation.
Now, that Lazarus should lie stranded there on the curbstone before the door of Dives, this is more wonderful than that an iceberg should be moored to one of the Moluccas.
Cribbed and barred and moored by massive rusty chains, the prison-ship seemed in my young eyes to be ironed like the prisoners.
He met with more adventures than can be told, and narrowly escaped being caught by the Basking Shark, and the Spotted Shark, and the Hammerhead, and he met all the untrustworthy ruffians that loaf up and down the seas, and the heavy polite fish, and the scarlet spotted scallops that are moored in one place for hundreds of years, and grow very proud of it; but he never met Sea Cow, and he never found an island that he could fancy.
I travelled towards it, and was pleased to see a vessel moored about half a mile from shore.
Forty men launched it on the river, a dozen others holding the cords which moored it to the shore.
At six o'clock in the evening we had regained the shore; our boat was moored to the usual place.
The Rangoon was moored half a mile off in the harbour, its signal of departure hoisted at the mast-head.
While I was doing this I left the boat moored to an inward projection of the reef, for fear of the Beast People.
The boat was moored to the shore, and they advanced a few paces to find a comfortable bivouac; but, doubtless, the spot they chose did not suit the smuggler who filled the post of sentinel, for he cried out, "Not that way, if you please.
They moored the vessel a little way out from land, and then came on shore and went to the house of King Alcinous.