moorland


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moor·land

 (mo͝or′lănd′)
n.
Land consisting of moors.

moorland

(ˈmʊələnd; ˈmɔː-)
n
(Physical Geography) Brit an area of moor
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moorland - open land usually with peaty soil covered with heather and bracken and moss
champaign, plain, field - extensive tract of level open land; "they emerged from the woods onto a vast open plain"; "he longed for the fields of his youth"
Translations
إمْتِداد أرض سَبْخَه
step
hedeland
mocsaras terület
mÿrlendi, lyngheiîi
fundalık arazi

moorland

[ˈmʊələnd] Npáramo m, brezal m

moorland

[ˈmʊərlænd] nlande f

moorland

nMoor- or Heideland nt

moorland

[ˈmʊələnd] nbrughiera

moor1

(muə) noun
a large stretch of open, unfarmed land with poor soil often covered with heather, coarse grass etc.
ˈmoorland noun
a stretch of moor.
References in classic literature ?
It ran up from a small market town through a dreary undulating moorland, forking off here and there to unknown villages of which the horizon gave no hint.
The sun was not long up, and shone straight in our eyes; a little, thin mist went up from the face of the moorland like a smoke; so that (as Alan said) there might have been twenty squadron of dragoons there and we none the wiser.
The church, a dreary building of grey stone, was situated in a little valley, so as to be sheltered from the bleak winds blowing over the moorland all round it.
The magnificent moorland silence was suddenly profaned by a man's voice, speaking (or rather croaking) behind me.
Within the hall all was gladness, but without on the lone moorland there stalked a grim monster, named Grendel, whose dark heart was filled with anger and hate.
The stories she had been told by her Ayah when she lived in India had been quite unlike those Martha had to tell about the moorland cottage which held fourteen people who lived in four little rooms and never had quite enough to eat.
Scrambling through some rough woods, he came out upon a moorland reaching towards the hills.
We see under the feet of our ponies a mixture of moorland and bog--here, the strip of firm ground that we are standing on, and there, a few feet off, the strip of watery peat-bog, which is deep enough to suffocate us if we step into it.
From the well-known names of these towns I learn in what county I have lighted; a north-midland shire, dusk with moorland, ridged with mountain: this I see.
On one side of it were the last houses of the straggling village, and on the other nothing but a waste moorland stretching away toward the sea, the line of which was broken by no landmark except a solitary tower of the prehistoric pattern still found in Ireland, standing up as slender as a column, but pointed like a pyramid.
As my eyes wandered over the steep banks covered with young grass and green-leaved plants, and surmounted by budding hedges, I longed intensely for some familiar flower that might recall the woody dales or green hill-sides of home: the brown moorlands, of course, were out of the question.
night shepherds upon the moorlands, and they cried to