moraine

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mo·raine

 (mə-rān′)
n.
An accumulation of boulders, stones, or other debris carried and deposited by a glacier.

[French, from French dialectal morena, mound of earth, from Provençal morre, muzzle, from Vulgar Latin *murrum.]

mo·rain′al, mo·rain′ic adj.

moraine

(mɒˈreɪn)
n
(Physical Geography) a mass of debris, carried by glaciers and forming ridges and mounds when deposited
[C18: from French, from Savoy dialect morena, of obscure origin]
moˈrainal, moˈrainic adj

mo•raine

(məˈreɪn)

n.
1. a ridge, mound, or irregular mass of unstratified glacial drift, chiefly boulders, gravel, sand, and clay.
2. a deposit of such material left on the ground by a glacier.
[1780–90; < French < Franco-Provençal morêna rise in the ground =mour(o) mound + -ena suffix of landforms]
mo•rain′al, mo•rain′ic, adj.

mo·raine

(mə-rān′)
A mass of boulders, pebbles, sand, and mud deposited in the form of a long ridge along the front or sides of a glacier. Moraines typically form because of the plowing effect of a moving glacier, which causes it to pick up rock fragments and sediments as it moves, and because of the periodic melting of the ice, which causes the glacier to deposit these materials during warmer intervals. ♦ A moraine that forms in front of a glacier is a terminal moraine. ♦ A moraine that forms along the side of a glacier is a lateral moraine.

moraine

Rock debris moved or dumped by a melting glacier or ice sheet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moraine - accumulated earth and stones deposited by a glaciermoraine - accumulated earth and stones deposited by a glacier
glacier - a slowly moving mass of ice
earth, ground - the loose soft material that makes up a large part of the land surface; "they dug into the earth outside the church"
Translations

moraine

[mɒˈreɪn] Nmorena f

moraine

nMoräne f

moraine

[mɒˈreɪn] nmorena
References in periodicals archive ?
These show that following retreat of the Hiram ice, possibly meltwater and eventually local runoff was ponded in low areas between bedrock highs adjacent to the valley and morainal deposits within the valley.
The conventional Bayesian measure of model fit--the morainal likelihood--also indicates the model without gradualism fits the data much worse than our preferred Taylor rule specification.
Wetlands used as nesting sites by female salamanders generally fall within three habitat types: l) ephemeral pools and ponds in flatwoods, 2) depressional ponds and swamps, usually within the context of morainal glacial terrain, and 3) groundwater seepage communities or seep springs.
The general grain of the morphology of the seabed is southwest-northeast (glacial morainal grain) and the mussel reefs show a direct relationship to this orientation and morphology as they are generally confined to the east side of the ridges.
Extensive sand deposits within the state supporting sand prairie and associated sand communities include: 1) the Chicago Lake Plain Section and the Lake Michigan Dunes Section of the Northeastern Morainal Natural Division, 2) the Green River Lowland Section and the Kankakee Sand Area Section of the Grand Prairie Natural Division, and 3) the Illinois River Section and Mississippi River Section of the Illinois River and Mississippi River Sand Areas Natural Division (Hart and Gleason 1907, Gleason 1910, Schwegman 1973, Lineback 1979, Swink and Wilhelm 1994).
This mode of deposition suggests that the Lake Border moraine may be more accurately thought of as a morainal bank deposited in a glacial lake rather than a purely terrestrial end moraine.
Ignace subsection of the Niagaran Escarpment, an area characterized by shallow morainal soils and occasional glacial erratics (Albert 1995).