moralist

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Related to moralists: morality

mor·al·ist

 (môr′ə-lĭst, mŏr′-)
n.
1. A teacher or student of morals and moral problems.
2. One who follows a system of moral principles.
3. One who is unduly concerned with the morals of others.

moralist

(ˈmɒrəlɪst)
n
1. (Education) a person who seeks to regulate the morals of others or to imbue others with a sense of morality
2. (Philosophy) a person who lives in accordance with moral principles
3. (Philosophy) a philosopher who is concerned with casuistic discussions of right action, or who seeks a general characterization of right action, often contrasted with a moral philosopher whose concern is with general philosophical questions about ethics
ˌmoralˈistic adj
ˌmoralˈistically adv

mor•al•ist

(ˈmɔr ə lɪst, ˈmɒr-)

n.
1. a person who practices, teaches, or inculcates morality.
2. a philosopher concerned with the principles of morality.
3. a person concerned with regulating morals, as by censorship.
[1615–25]
mor`al•is′tic, adj.
mor`al•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moralist - a philosopher who specializes in morals and moral problems
egalitarian, equalitarian - a person who believes in the equality of all people
elitist - someone who believes in rule by an elite group
philosopher - a specialist in philosophy
utilitarian - someone who believes that the value of a thing depends on its utility
2.moralist - someone who demands exact conformity to rules and formsmoralist - someone who demands exact conformity to rules and forms
authoritarian, dictator - a person who behaves in a tyrannical manner; "my boss is a dictator who makes everyone work overtime"
stickler - someone who insists on something; "a stickler for promptness"
Translations
moralisti

moralist

[ˈmɒrəlɪst] Nmoralizador(a) m/f; (= philosopher, teacher) → moralista mf

moralist

n (Philos, fig) → Moralist(in) m(f)

moralist

[ˈmɒrəlɪst] nmoralista m/f
References in classic literature ?
His looks shewing him not pained, but pleased with this allusion to his situation, she was emboldened to go on; and feeling in herself the right of seniority of mind, she ventured to recommend a larger allowance of prose in his daily study; and on being requested to particularize, mentioned such works of our best moralists, such collections of the finest letters, such memoirs of characters of worth and suffering, as occurred to her at the moment as calculated to rouse and fortify the mind by the highest precepts, and the strongest examples of moral and religious endurances.
Moralists will be glad to hear that I really suffered acute mental misery at this time of my life.
We would not, however, have our reader imagine, that persons of such characters as were supported by Thwackum and Square, would undertake a matter of this kind, which hath been a little censured by some rigid moralists, before they had thoroughly examined it, and considered whether it was (as Shakespear phrases it) "Stuff o' th' conscience," or no.
6 Many of them again are of later origin, and are to be traced to the monks of the middle ages: and yet this collection, though thus made up of fables both earlier and later than the era of Aesop, rightfully bears his name, because he composed so large a number (all framed in the same mould, and conformed to the same fashion, and stamped with the same lineaments, image, and superscription) as to secure to himself the right to be considered the father of Greek fables, and the founder of this class of writing, which has ever since borne his name, and has secured for him, through all succeeding ages, the position of the first of moralists.
This writer went through all the usual topics of European moralists, showing "how diminutive, contemptible, and helpless an animal was man in his own nature; how unable to defend himself from inclemencies of the air, or the fury of wild beasts: how much he was excelled by one creature in strength, by another in speed, by a third in foresight, by a fourth in industry.
On the other hand, I compared the disquisitions of the ancient moralists to very towering and magnificent palaces with no better foundation than sand and mud: they laud the virtues very highly, and exhibit them as estimable far above anything on earth; but they give us no adequate criterion of virtue, and frequently that which they designate with so fine a name is but apathy, or pride, or despair, or parricide.
The American will know how to appreciate the importance of this opinion, in relation to the house in question, when he is told that it was written by one of those inspired moralists, and profound constitutional lawyers, and ingenious political economists, who daily teach their fellow creatures how to give practical illustrations of the mandates of the Bible, how to discriminate in vexed questions arising from the national compact, and how to manage their private affairs in such a way as to escape the quicksands that have wrecked their own.
You're a great moralist, and that's the fact," said Porthos.
Shrouded in perpetual mist, men love each other better; for the only reality then is the family, and, within the family, the heart; and the greatest thoughts come from the heart--so says the moralist.
Colbert was a man in whom the historian and the moralist have an equal right.
In the substance of his work Johnson is most conspicuously, and of set purpose, a moralist.
For in a desire to win quickly and to win much I can see nothing sordid; I have always applauded the opinion of a certain dead and gone, but cocksure, moralist who replied to the excuse that " one may always gamble moderately ", by saying that to do so makes things worse, since, in that case, the profits too will always be moderate.