morally


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Related to morally: Morally wrong

mor·al

 (môr′əl, mŏr′-)
adj.
1. Of or concerned with the judgment of right or wrong of human action and character: moral scrutiny; a moral quandary.
2. Teaching or exhibiting goodness or correctness of character and behavior: a moral lesson.
3. Conforming to standards of what is right or just in behavior; virtuous: a moral life.
4. Arising from conscience or the sense of right and wrong: a moral obligation.
5. Having psychological rather than physical or tangible effects: a moral victory; moral support.
6. Based on strong likelihood or firm conviction, rather than on the actual evidence: a moral certainty.
n.
1. The lesson or principle contained in or taught by a fable, a story, or an event.
2. A concisely expressed precept or general truth; a maxim: likes to follow the moral "To each, his own."
3. morals Rules or habits of conduct, especially of sexual conduct, with reference to standards of right and wrong: a person of loose morals; a decline in the public morals.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin mōrālis, from mōs, mōr-, custom; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

mor′al·ly adv.
Synonyms: moral, ethical, virtuous, righteous
These adjectives mean in accord with right or good conduct. Moral applies to personal character and behavior: "Our moral sense dictates a clearcut preference for these societies which share with us an abiding respect for individual human rights" (Jimmy Carter).
Ethical stresses idealistic standards of right and wrong: "Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants" (Omar Bradley).
Virtuous implies moral excellence and loftiness of character: "The life of the nation is secure only while the nation is honest, truthful, and virtuous" (Frederick Douglass).
Righteous emphasizes moral uprightness; when it is applied to actions, reactions, or impulses, it often implies justifiable outrage: "It was righteous anger that motivated letters written by whistle-blowing employees" (Sandra P. Thomas).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.morally - with respect to moral principles; "morally unjustified"
2.morally - in a moral manner; "he acted morally under the circumstances"
amorally, immorally - without regard for morality; "he acted immorally when his own interests were at stake"
Translations
أخلاقِيّاً
morálněmravně
moralskt
erkölcsilegerkölcsösen
siîferîilega
morálne
moralno
ahlâklı şekilde

morally

[ˈmɒrəlɪ] ADV [superior, responsible] → moralmente; [right, wrong] → desde el punto de vista moral; [act, behave] → moralmente, éticamente
a morally bankrupt societyuna sociedad en bancarrota moral

morally

[ˈmɒrəli] adv
[live, behave] → moralement
[responsible] → moralement
to be morally responsible for sth → être moralement responsable de qch
to hold sb morally responsible for sth → tenir qn moralement responsable de qch
I hold you morally responsible for her death → Je vous tiens moralement responsable de sa mort.moral support (= encouragement) nsoutien m moral
to give sb moral support → apporter à qn un soutien moralmoral victory nvictoire f morale

morally

adv
(= ethically)moralisch; I am morally certain that …ich bin moralisch überzeugt, dass …
(= virtuously)integer, moralisch einwandfrei; (sexually) → tugendhaft

morally

[ˈmɒrəlɪ] adv (act) → moralmente
morally wrong → moralmente sbagliato/a

moral

(ˈmorəl) adjective
of, or relating to, character or behaviour especially right behaviour. high moral standards; He leads a very moral (= good) life.
noun
the lesson to be learned from something that happens, or from a story. The moral of this story is that crime doesn't pay.
ˈmorally adverb
moˈrality noun
morals noun plural
one's principles and behaviour. He has no morals and will do anything for money.
References in classic literature ?
I don't complain near as much as the others do, and I shall be more careful than ever now, for I've had warning from Susies's downfall," said Amy morally.
A slumberous veil diffused itself over his countenance, and had an effect, morally speaking, on its naturally delicate and elegant outline, like that which a brooding mist, with no sunshine in it, throws over the features of a landscape.
Morally, as well as materially, there was a coarser fibre in those wives and maidens of old English birth and breeding than in their fair descendants, separated from them by a series of six or seven generations; for, throughout that chain of ancestry, every successive mother had transmitted to her child a fainter bloom, a more delicate and briefer beauty, and a slighter physical frame, if not character of less force and solidity than her own.
They were like the cherubs of the anecdote, who had-- morally, at any rate--nothing to whack
Shelby was a woman of high class, both intellectually and morally.
I could have given my own sect the preference and made everybody a Presby- terian without any trouble, but that would have been to affront a law of human nature: spiritual wants and instincts are as various in the human family as are physical appetites, complexions, and features, and a man is only at his best, morally, when he is equipped with the religious garment whose color and shape and size most nicely accommodate themselves to the spirit- ual complexion, angularities, and stature of the indi- vidual who wears it; and, besides, I was afraid of a united Church; it makes a mighty power, the mightiest conceivable, and then when it by and by gets into selfish hands, as it is always bound to do, it means death to human liberty and paralysis to human thought.
It is, to be sure; and when you get to Bitternutt Lodge, Connaught, Ireland, I shall never see you again, Jane: that's morally certain.
None for my friend,' she replied: 'his strong head will keep him from danger; a little for Hindley: but he can't be made morally worse than he is; and I stand between him and bodily harm.
Taken, however, with the postscript which Admiral Bartram attached to it (you will see the lines if you look under the signature on the third page), it becomes legally binding, as well as morally binding, on the admiral's representatives.
Through all my punishments, disgraces, fasts and vigils, and other penitential performances, I had nursed this assurance; and to my communing so much with it, in a solitary and unprotected way, I in great part refer the fact that I was morally timid and very sensitive.
But if I were sure they were raving--as I am morally certain one, at least, of them is down with fever--I should leave this camp, and at whatever risk to my own carcass, take them the assistance of my skill.
He was a Calabrian by birth, and a worthy man morally, and he treated his slaves with great humanity.