morals


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mor·al

 (môr′əl, mŏr′-)
adj.
1. Of or concerned with the judgment of right or wrong of human action and character: moral scrutiny; a moral quandary.
2. Teaching or exhibiting goodness or correctness of character and behavior: a moral lesson.
3. Conforming to standards of what is right or just in behavior; virtuous: a moral life.
4. Arising from conscience or the sense of right and wrong: a moral obligation.
5. Having psychological rather than physical or tangible effects: a moral victory; moral support.
6. Based on strong likelihood or firm conviction, rather than on the actual evidence: a moral certainty.
n.
1. The lesson or principle contained in or taught by a fable, a story, or an event.
2. A concisely expressed precept or general truth; a maxim: likes to follow the moral "To each, his own."
3. morals Rules or habits of conduct, especially of sexual conduct, with reference to standards of right and wrong: a person of loose morals; a decline in the public morals.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin mōrālis, from mōs, mōr-, custom; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

mor′al·ly adv.
Synonyms: moral, ethical, virtuous, righteous
These adjectives mean in accord with right or good conduct. Moral applies to personal character and behavior: "Our moral sense dictates a clearcut preference for these societies which share with us an abiding respect for individual human rights" (Jimmy Carter).
Ethical stresses idealistic standards of right and wrong: "Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants" (Omar Bradley).
Virtuous implies moral excellence and loftiness of character: "The life of the nation is secure only while the nation is honest, truthful, and virtuous" (Frederick Douglass).
Righteous emphasizes moral uprightness; when it is applied to actions, reactions, or impulses, it often implies justifiable outrage: "It was righteous anger that motivated letters written by whistle-blowing employees" (Sandra P. Thomas).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.morals - motivation based on ideas of right and wrong
motivation, motive, need - the psychological feature that arouses an organism to action toward a desired goal; the reason for the action; that which gives purpose and direction to behavior; "we did not understand his motivation"; "he acted with the best of motives"
hedonism - the pursuit of pleasure as a matter of ethical principle
conscience, moral sense, scruples, sense of right and wrong - motivation deriving logically from ethical or moral principles that govern a person's thoughts and actions
Christ Within, Inner Light, Light Within, Light - a divine presence believed by Quakers to enlighten and guide the soul
Translations
أخْلاقأخْلَاقٌ
mravymorálka
moralmoralbegrebermoralfølelse
moraali
moral
erkölcsök
siîferîiskennd
品行
윤리
moral
หลักความประพฤติ
quy tắc đạo đức

moral

(ˈmorəl) adjective
of, or relating to, character or behaviour especially right behaviour. high moral standards; He leads a very moral (= good) life.
noun
the lesson to be learned from something that happens, or from a story. The moral of this story is that crime doesn't pay.
ˈmorally adverb
moˈrality noun
morals noun plural
one's principles and behaviour. He has no morals and will do anything for money.

morals

أخْلَاقٌ mravy moralbegreber Moral ήθη moralidad moraali morale moral principi morali 品行 윤리 moralen etikk morały princípios morais нравы moral หลักความประพฤติ ahlak kuralları quy tắc đạo đức 品行
References in classic literature ?
He declared them to be, like all other morals, merely an expedient for protecting a certain type of man.
CON tal que las costumbres de un autor," says Don Thomas de las Torres, in the preface to his "Amatory Poems" "sean puras y castas, importo muy poco que no sean igualmente severas sus obras" -- meaning, in plain English, that, provided the morals of an author are pure personally, it signifies nothing what are the morals of his books.
He is a great teacher, a corrector of morals, a censor of vice, and a commender of virtue.
Merely that it has not been so long known in morals, as the other countries of Christendom.
A MORAL Principle met a Material Interest on a bridge wide enough for but one.
There is such a thing as moral courage, and moral courage is never without effect.
I can't tell you just now what the moral of that is, but I shall remember it in a bit.
The moral I draw is that the writer should seek his reward in the pleasure of his work and in release from the burden of his thought; and, indifferent to aught else, care nothing for praise or censure, failure or success.
We may get into moral entanglements; before we know it, we may be in the midst of a struggle between good and evil.
Since the objects of imitation are men in action, and these men must be either of a higher or a lower type (for moral character mainly answers to these divisions, goodness and badness being the distinguishing marks of moral differences), it follows that we must represent men either as better than in real life, or as worse, or as they are.
The Moral Law causes the people to be in complete accord with their ruler, so that they will follow him regardless of their lives, undismayed by any danger.
The moral force of the attacking French army was exhausted.