more or less


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more

 (môr)
adj.Comparative of many much
1.
a. Greater in number: a hall with more seats.
b. Greater in size, amount, extent, or degree: more land; more support.
2. Additional; extra: She needs some more time.
n.
A greater or additional quantity, number, degree, or amount: The more I see of you the more I like you.
pron.
(used with a pl. verb) A greater or additional number of persons or things: I opened only two bottles but more were in the refrigerator.
adv.Comparative of much
1.
a. To or in a greater extent or degree: loved him even more.
b. Used to form the comparative of many adjectives and adverbs: more difficult; more softly. See Usage Note at perfect.
2. In addition: phoned twice more.
3. Moreover; furthermore.
Idioms:
more and more
To a steadily increasing extent or degree: getting more and more worried.
more or less
1. About; approximately: holds two tons, more or less.
2. To an undetermined degree: were more or less in agreement.

[Middle English, from Old English māra and māre; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: When a noun phrase contains more than one and a singular noun, the verb is normally singular: More than one editor is working on that project. More than one field has been planted with oats. When more than one is followed by of and a plural noun, the verb is plural: More than one of the paintings were stolen. More than one of the cottages are for sale. When more than one stands alone, it usually takes a singular verb, but it may take a plural verb if the notion of multiplicity predominates: The operating rooms are all in good order. More than one is (or are) equipped with the latest imaging technology. See Usage Notes at one, over.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.more or less - (of quantities) imprecise but fairly close to correctmore or less - (of quantities) imprecise but fairly close to correct; "lasted approximately an hour"; "in just about a minute"; "he's about 30 years old"; "I've had about all I can stand"; "we meet about once a month"; "some forty people came"; "weighs around a hundred pounds"; "roughly $3,000"; "holds 3 gallons, more or less"; "20 or so people were at the party"
2.more or less - to a small degree or extent; "his arguments were somewhat self-contradictory"; "the children argued because one slice of cake was slightly larger than the other"
Translations
تَقْريبا
víceménězhruba
mere eller mindre
nokkurn veginn, um òaî bil
daugiau ar mažiau
viac-menej

more

(moː) comparative of many ~much adjective
1. a greater number or quantity of. I've more pencils than he has.
2. an additional number or quantity of. We need some more milk.
adverb
1. used to form the comparative of many adjectives and adverbs, especially those of more than two syllables. She can do it more easily that I can; He is much more intelligent than they are.
2. to a greater degree or extent. I'm exercising a little more now than I used to.
3. again. We'll play it once more.
pronoun
1. a greater number or quantity. `Are there a lot of people?' `There are far more than we expected.'
2. an additional number or amount. We've run out of paint. Will you go and get some more?
moreˈover adverb
also; what is more important. I don't like the idea, and moreover, I think it's illegal.
any more
any longer; nowadays. He doesn't go any more, but he used to go twice a week.
more and more
increasingly. It's becoming more and more difficult to see.
more or less
approximately or almost. They've more or less finished the job; The distance is ten kilometres, more or less.
the more … the more/less
The more I see her, the more/less I like her.
what is / what's more
moreover. He came home after midnight, and what's more, he was drunk.
References in classic literature ?
Incidentally the professor will gather in any other antiques of more or less value, if he can find any, and he hopes, even if he doesn't find the idol, to get enough historical material for half a dozen books, to say nothing of magazine articles.
All the drivers were more or less the worse for merry-making, and the groom was absorbed in his bride.
However, as Caddy's illness had certainly interfered, more or less, with my home duties--though I had always been there in the morning to make my guardian's breakfast, and he had a hundred times laughed and said there must be two little women, for his little woman was never missing--I resolved to be doubly diligent and gay.