morganatic


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mor·ga·nat·ic

 (môr′gə-năt′ĭk)
adj.
Of or being a legal marriage between a person of royal or noble birth and a partner of lower rank, in which it is agreed that no titles or estates of the royal or noble partner are to be shared by the partner of inferior rank nor by any of the offspring of the marriage.

[New Latin morganāticus, from Medieval Latin (mātrimōnium ad) morganāticam, (marriage for the) morning-gift, of Germanic origin.]

mor′ga·nat′i·cal·ly adv.

morganatic

(ˌmɔːɡəˈnætɪk)
adj
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) of or designating a marriage between a person of high rank and a person of low rank, by which the latter is not elevated to the higher rank and any issue have no rights to the succession of the higher party's titles, property, etc
2. (Historical Terms) of or designating a marriage between a person of high rank and a person of low rank, by which the latter is not elevated to the higher rank and any issue have no rights to the succession of the higher party's titles, property, etc
[C18: from the Medieval Latin phrase mātrimōnium ad morganāticum marriage based on the morning-gift (a token present after consummation representing the husband's only liability); morganātica, ultimately from Old High German morgan morning; compare Old English morgengiefu morning-gift]
ˌmorgaˈnatically adv

mor•ga•nat•ic

(ˌmɔr gəˈnæt ɪk)

adj.
designating or pertaining to a marriage in which a person of high rank, as a member of the nobility, marries someone of lower station with the stipulation that neither the low-ranking spouse nor their children will have any claim to the titles or entailed property of the high-ranking partner.
[1720–30; < New Latin morganāticus (adj.), for Medieval Latin phrase (mātrimōnium) ad morganāticam (marriage) to the extent of morning-gift]
mor`ga•nat′i•cal•ly, adv.

morganatic

- A survival of an ancient Germanic marriage custom, a gift on the morning after the wedding from husband to wife called morgangeba, "morning" and "give"; it now describes a marriage between people of different social status, especially a man of superior rank and woman of inferior rank.
See also related terms for wedding.

morganatic

designating or pertaining to a marriage between a man of high social standing and a woman of lower station in which the marriage contract stipulates that neither she nor their offspring will have claim to his rank or property.
See also: Marriage
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.morganatic - (of marriages) of a marriage between one of royal or noble birth and one of lower rank; valid but with the understanding that the rank of the inferior remains unchanged and offspring do not succeed to titles or property of the superior
legitimate - of marriages and offspring; recognized as lawful
Translations

morganatic

[ˌmɔːgəˈnætɪk] ADJmorganático

morganatic

adjmorganatisch

morganatic

[ˌmɔːgəˈnætɪk] adjmorganatico/a
References in classic literature ?
Lola Montes, a dancer, became the morganatic wife of King Louis of Bavaria and was created Countess of Landsfeld.
If it were some decent morganatic affair I wouldn't say; but he must have been a fool to throw away thousands on a woman like that.
In November 1880, Alexander II had drawn up a document for his eldest son and heir, outlining how he wished his morganatic second wife, and their children, to be taken care of in the event of his death.
Unbeknownst to everyone else, her brother included, the cunning Eugenia is actually on the hunt for a new husband, facing, as she is, a politically motivated annulment of her morganatic marriage.
Miranda and Title II: A Morganatic Marriage, 1969 Sup.
On the morning of June 28, 1914, Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne and his morganatic wife the Duchess Sophie, set off on what was to be their final public engagement.
36) Two events, in particular, would place Baldwin at the center of considerable public controversy during the mid-thirties: his support for the 1935 Hoare-Laval Pact that proposed the partitioning of Abyssinia--about which then Secretary of State for War Duff Cooper wrote, "I have never witnessed so devastating a wave of public opinion" (193)--and his refusal to introduce a bill in favor of morganatic marriage in December 1936, which was perceived by the public as having unceremoniously forced Edward VIII's hand in favor of abdication.
299-329; Lesley Hall, '"The English Have Hot-Water Bottles': The Morganatic Marriage Between Sexology and Medicine in Britain since William Acton," in Roy Porter and Mikulas C.
He describes Henry's stubborn thinking after learning of Bon's morganatic ceremony: "I will believe; I will.
On tour of inspection heir to Austrian throne and his morganatic wife escape bomb only to die few hours later by bullet.
Violin, sea horse and mermaid Cradle of the hearts, heart and cradle Tears of Mary Magdalene A queen's sigh Echo, Violin, pride of the swift-handed A departure astride waters Love overlapping mystery A praying thief Bird, Violin morganatic wife Puss in Boots dashing through the forest Well of the whimsical truths Public confession Corset, Violin palliative of the lost soul17 Preference, strength of the evening Shoulder of sudden seasons Oak leaf, Mirror Violin knight of silence Happiness' runaway toy Breast of a thousand presences Pleasure boat Huntsman.
The decree introduced the principle of "unequal" or morganatic marriages into Russian law--developed by German royal houses wishing to impart a degree of flexibility to marriage rules by allowing princes wishing to embark on second marriages to wed spouses not of royal lineage by forfeiting royal titles and rights for their progeny.