morganatic


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mor·ga·nat·ic

 (môr′gə-năt′ĭk)
adj.
Of or being a legal marriage between a person of royal or noble birth and a partner of lower rank, in which it is agreed that no titles or estates of the royal or noble partner are to be shared by the partner of inferior rank nor by any of the offspring of the marriage.

[New Latin morganāticus, from Medieval Latin (mātrimōnium ad) morganāticam, (marriage for the) morning-gift, of Germanic origin.]

mor′ga·nat′i·cal·ly adv.

morganatic

(ˌmɔːɡəˈnætɪk)
adj
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) of or designating a marriage between a person of high rank and a person of low rank, by which the latter is not elevated to the higher rank and any issue have no rights to the succession of the higher party's titles, property, etc
2. (Historical Terms) of or designating a marriage between a person of high rank and a person of low rank, by which the latter is not elevated to the higher rank and any issue have no rights to the succession of the higher party's titles, property, etc
[C18: from the Medieval Latin phrase mātrimōnium ad morganāticum marriage based on the morning-gift (a token present after consummation representing the husband's only liability); morganātica, ultimately from Old High German morgan morning; compare Old English morgengiefu morning-gift]
ˌmorgaˈnatically adv

mor•ga•nat•ic

(ˌmɔr gəˈnæt ɪk)

adj.
designating or pertaining to a marriage in which a person of high rank, as a member of the nobility, marries someone of lower station with the stipulation that neither the low-ranking spouse nor their children will have any claim to the titles or entailed property of the high-ranking partner.
[1720–30; < New Latin morganāticus (adj.), for Medieval Latin phrase (mātrimōnium) ad morganāticam (marriage) to the extent of morning-gift]
mor`ga•nat′i•cal•ly, adv.

morganatic

- A survival of an ancient Germanic marriage custom, a gift on the morning after the wedding from husband to wife called morgangeba, "morning" and "give"; it now describes a marriage between people of different social status, especially a man of superior rank and woman of inferior rank.
See also related terms for wedding.

morganatic

designating or pertaining to a marriage between a man of high social standing and a woman of lower station in which the marriage contract stipulates that neither she nor their offspring will have claim to his rank or property.
See also: Marriage
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.morganatic - (of marriages) of a marriage between one of royal or noble birth and one of lower rank; valid but with the understanding that the rank of the inferior remains unchanged and offspring do not succeed to titles or property of the superior
legitimate - of marriages and offspring; recognized as lawful
Translations

morganatic

[ˌmɔːgəˈnætɪk] ADJmorganático

morganatic

adjmorganatisch

morganatic

[ˌmɔːgəˈnætɪk] adjmorganatico/a
References in classic literature ?
Lola Montes, a dancer, became the morganatic wife of King Louis of Bavaria and was created Countess of Landsfeld.
If it were some decent morganatic affair I wouldn't say; but he must have been a fool to throw away thousands on a woman like that.
On the morning of June 28, 1914, Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne and his morganatic wife the Duchess Sophie, set off on what was to be their final public engagement.
Tellingly, Michael's Elphberg blood is "compromised," in this case by a morganatic marriage.
299-329; Lesley Hall, '"The English Have Hot-Water Bottles': The Morganatic Marriage Between Sexology and Medicine in Britain since William Acton," in Roy Porter and Mikulas C.
On tour of inspection heir to Austrian throne and his morganatic wife escape bomb only to die few hours later by bullet.
They ought to get married and be together, but it should be a morganatic marriage which means she doesn't become Queen.
Could this mean a morganatic marriage was on the cards?
The reference to Ella Kaye as "Madame de Maintenon," the secret wife of King Louis XIV of France (married in a morganatic marriage--a marriage, in the context of European royalty, which prevents the passage of any titles and privileges to the wife or any children from the marriage) illuminates Kaye's blackmailing of Cody and the basis on which she later contests his will.
The Emperor was the aged Franz Joseph, who had succeeded in 1848, and his heir was his nephew Archduke Franz Ferdinand, whose morganatic marriage barred his own sons from succeeding.
In fact, Simo's Julia hears that sentiment expressed quite clearly by the surgeon who is about to sterilize her as a precondition to her morganatic marriage: "Voste canvia una vida feixuga per una vida falaguera.
Her own enthrallment with the story of Madame de Maintenon, morganatic second wife to Louis XIV of France, suggests some intriguing parallels: "born in the workhouse, mysterious childhood visit to America, married as a girl to brilliant paralyzed poet, widowed, gets to be governess to the king's bastards and next thing you know she's reformed the king and married him" 197).