rounds

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round 1

 (round)
adj. round·er, round·est
1.
a. Being such that every part of the surface or the circumference is equidistant from the center: a round ball.
b. Moving in or forming a circle.
c. Shaped like a cylinder; cylindrical.
d. Rather rounded in shape: the child's round face.
e. Full in physique; plump: a round figure.
2.
a. Linguistics Formed or articulated with the lips in a rounded shape: a round vowel.
b. Full in tone; sonorous.
3. Whole or complete; full: a round dozen.
4.
a. Mathematics Having been rounded.
b. Not exact, especially when expressed as a multiple of 10; approximate: a round estimate.
5. Large; considerable: a round sum of money.
6. Brought to satisfactory conclusion or completion; finished.
7.
a. Outspoken; blunt: a round scolding.
b. Done with full force; unrestrained: gave me a round thrashing.
n.
1.
a. Something, such as a circle, disk, globe, or ring, that is round.
b. A circle formed of various things.
c. Movement around a circle or about an axis.
2. A rung or crossbar, as one on a ladder or chair.
3. A cut of beef from the part of the thigh between the rump and the shank.
4. An assembly of people; a group.
5. A round dance.
6.
a. A complete course, succession, or series: a round of parties; a round of negotiations.
b. often rounds A course of customary or prescribed actions, duties, or places: physicians' rounds.
7. A complete range or extent.
8. One drink for each person in a gathering or group: Let me buy the next round.
9. A single outburst, as of applause or cheering.
10.
a. A single shot or volley.
b. Ammunition for a single shot or volley.
11. A specified number of arrows shot from a specified distance to a target in archery.
12. Sports & Games A unit of play that occupies a specified time, constitutes a certain number of plays, or allows each player a turn, especially the 18-hole sequence played in golf or one of the periods in a boxing match.
13. Music A composition for two or more voices in which each voice enters at a different time with the same melody.
v. round·ed, round·ing, rounds
v.tr.
1. To make round or curved: rounded his lips in surprise; rounded off the end of the board.
2. Linguistics To pronounce with rounded lips; labialize.
3. To fill out; make plump.
4. To bring to completion or perfection; finish. Often used with out or off: The new dog rounded out our household. The speaker rounded off his lecture with a joke.
5. Mathematics To approximate (a real number) by a nearby rational number with a specified level of precision. When rounded to the nearest hundred, 286 becomes 300. When rounded to the nearest tenth, 1.63 becomes 1.6.
6.
a. To make a turn about or to the other side of: rounded a bend in the road.
b. To make a complete circuit of; go or pass around: rounded the entire peninsula.
7. Archaic To encompass; surround:
v.intr.
1. To become round or curved.
2. To take a circular course; complete or partially complete a circuit: racecars rounding into the final lap.
3. To turn about, as on an axis: rounded and came back across the field.
4. To become filled out or plump.
5. To develop into satisfactory completion or perfection: is rounding into a fine quarterback.
adv.
1. In a circular progression or movement; around.
2. With revolutions: wheels moving round.
3. To a specific place or person: called round for the pastor; sent round for the veterinarian.
prep.
1. Around.
2. From the beginning to the end of; throughout: a plant that grows round the year.
Phrasal Verbs:
round on
To turn on and assail.
round up
1. To seek out and bring together; gather.
2. To herd (cattle) together from various places.
Idioms:
in the round
1. With the stage in the center of the audience.
2. Fully shaped so as to stand free of a background: a sculpture in the round.
make/go the rounds
1. To go from place to place, as on business or for entertainment: a delivery truck making the rounds; students going the rounds in the entertainment district.
2. To be communicated or passed from person to person: The news quickly made the rounds. A piece of juicy gossip is going the rounds.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman rounde, variant of Old French rond, ultimately from Vulgar Latin *retundus, from Latin rotundus; see ret- in Indo-European roots.]

round′ness n.

round 2

 (round)
tr.v. round·ed, round·ing, rounds Archaic
To whisper.

[Middle English rounden, from Old English rūnian, from rūn, a secret.]
Translations
زيارَة أو جَوْلَة الطَّبيب على المَرْضى
návštěvy
sygebesøg
eftirlitsferî, sjúkraheimsóknir
návštevy

round

(raund) adjective
1. shaped like a circle or globe. a round hole; a round stone; This plate isn't quite round.
2. rather fat; plump. a round face.
adverb
1. in the opposite direction. He turned round.
2. in a circle. They all stood round and listened; A wheel goes round; All (the) year round.
3. from one person to another. They passed the letter round; The news went round.
4. from place to place. We drove round for a while.
5. in circumference. The tree measured two metres round.
6. to a particular place, usually a person's home. Are you coming round (to our house) tonight?
preposition
1. on all sides of. There was a wall round the garden; He looked round the room.
2. passing all sides of (and returning to the starting-place). They ran round the tree.
3. changing direction at. He came round the corner.
4. in or to all parts of. The news spread all round the town.
noun
1. a complete circuit. a round of drinks (= one for everyone present); a round of golf.
2. a regular journey one takes to do one's work. a postman's round.
3. a burst of cheering, shooting etc. They gave him a round of applause; The soldier fired several rounds.
4. a single bullet, shell etc. five hundred rounds of ammunition.
5. a stage in a competition etc. The winners of the first round will go through to the next.
6. a type of song sung by several singers singing the same tune starting in succession.
verb
to go round. The car rounded the corner.
ˈrounded adjective
curved; like part of the line forming a circle. a rounded arch.
ˈroundly adverb
plainly; rudely. He rebuked her roundly.
ˈroundness noun
rounds noun plural
a doctor's visits to his patients. The doctor is (out) on his rounds.
ˈall-round adjective
complete. It was an all-round success.
ˌall-ˈrounder noun
a person who has a talent for several different kinds of work, sport etc, or who can play in any position in a game.
ˈroundabout noun
1. a revolving machine on which one can ride for pleasure; a merry-go-round.
2. a circular piece of ground where several roads meet, and round which traffic must travel.
adjective
not direct. a roundabout route.
round figures/numbers
the nearest convenient or easily remembered numbers. Tell me the cost in round figures (ie $20 rather than $19.87).
ˌround-ˈshouldered adjective
with stooping shoulders.
round trip
1. (American) a journey to a place and back again (round-trip ticket a ticket for such a journey).
2. a trip to several places and back, taking a circular route.
all round
surrounding. There were people all round him.
round about
1. surrounding. She sat with her children round about her.
2. near. There are not many houses round about.
3. approximately. There must have been round about a thousand people there.
round off
1. to make something smooth etc. He rounded off the sharp corners with a file.
2. to complete successfully. He rounded off his career by becoming president.
round on
to turn to face (a person) suddenly, especially angrily.
round up to collect together: The farmer rounded up the sheep ( ˈround-up) noun

rounds

npl (by doctors) pase m de visita, rondas (Ang); to make — pasar visita, visitar diariamente a los pacientes hospitalizados
References in periodicals archive ?
The doctors were very extremely punctual on their morning rounds.
Morning Rounds from Ozery Bakery, which have a consistency somewhere between a pita and a scone, are a less guilty option for an easy, sweet, breakfast.
POLICE are seeking a man who allegedly invited a 14-year-old newspaper delivery boy into his car during the teenager's early morning rounds.
The woman, a patient who said she had come in for a regular check up at the ward at the Prince Ali Bin Al Hussein Military Hospital, abducted the infant while her mother had stepped out of the room, and doctors and nurses found that she had disappeared only during their morning rounds.
THE second round of the USPGA Championship saw two of this year's Major winners take the Oak Hill course by the scruff of the neck to lead the field after the morning rounds were completed, writes Ian Wilkerson.
A doctor of psychology was doing his normal morning rounds when he entered a patient's room.
On her morning rounds, Davis said she expected her Republican colleagues to "try to be a little bit smarter" with their approach to passing abortion restrictions in the special session, following her 11-hour filibuster on Tuesday.
Skelton and Ben Maher, on Tripple X III, both jumped smoothly in their morning rounds to be among 32 riders who went clear.
Based on real clinical scenarios, the 40 cases in this review are meant to mimic the morning rounds those studying for obstetrics written and oral boards might encounter.
After the three morning rounds, Sir Henry Morgan PC took the lead and proved to be too strong for any of the other team conceding only four points in any one game.
One of Canada's leading natural bakery brands announces US launch of Morning Rounds - toastable fruit & grain buns
A POSTMAN has claimed he saw a black panther-like beast strolling the streets of Coventry during his morning rounds.