Morocco


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Mo·roc·co

 (mə-rŏk′ō)
A country of northwest Africa on the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. Inhabited from ancient times by Berbers, the region became a Roman province in the 1st century ad and was conquered by Arabs in the 7th century. The country was later united (11th-13th century) under Berber-Muslim dynasties. The French established a protectorate over most of the region in 1912, and in 1956 Morocco achieved independence as a kingdom. Rabat is the capital and Casablanca the largest city.

Mo·roc′can adj. & n.

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Morocco

mo·roc·co

 (mə-rŏk′ō)
n. pl. mo·roc·cos
A soft fine leather of goatskin traditionally tanned with sumac and used especially for book bindings.

[After Morocco.]

morocco

(məˈrɒkəʊ)
n
(Tanning)
a. a fine soft leather made from goatskins, used for bookbinding, shoes, etc
b. (as modifier): morocco leather.
[C17: after Morocco, where it was originally made]

morocco

(məˈrɒkəʊ)
n
(Tanning)
a. a fine soft leather made from goatskins, used for bookbinding, shoes, etc
b. (as modifier): morocco leather.
[C17: after Morocco, where it was originally made]

Mo•roc•co

(məˈrɒk oʊ)

n.
1. French, Maroc. a kingdom in NW Africa: formed from a sultanate that was divided into two protectorates (French Morocco and Spanish Morocco) and an international zone. 29,661,636; 172,104 sq. mi. (445,749 sq. km).Cap.: Rabat.
2. (l.c.) a pebble-grained leather orig. made in Morocco from goatskin tanned with sumac.
Mo•roc′can, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Morocco - a kingdom (constitutional monarchy) in northwestern Africa with a largely Muslim populationMorocco - a kingdom (constitutional monarchy) in northwestern Africa with a largely Muslim population; achieved independence from France in 1956
Arab League - an international organization of independent Arab states formed in 1945 to promote cultural and economic and military and political and social cooperation
Maghreb, Mahgrib - the region of northwest Africa comprising the Atlas Mountains and the coastlands of Morocco and Algeria and Tunisia
Casablanca - a port on the Atlantic and the largest city of Morocco
El Aaium - a town in Morocco near the Atlantic coast
Fes, Fez - a city in north central Morocco; religious center
Marrakech, Marrakesh - a city in western Morocco; tourist center
Oujda - a city in northeastern Morocco near the Algerian border
capital of Morocco, Rabat - the capital of Morocco; located in the northwestern on the Atlantic coast
Tangier, Tangiers - a city of northern Morocco at the west end of the Strait of Gibraltar; "the first tangerines were shipped from Tangier to Europe in 1841"
Spanish Sahara, Western Sahara - an area in northwestern Africa with rich phosphate deposits; under Moroccan control since 1992
Atlas Mountains - a mountain range in northern Africa between the Mediterranean and the Sahara Desert; extends from southwestern Morocco to northern Tunisia
Abila, Abyla, Jebel Musa - a promontory in northern Morocco opposite the Rock of Gibraltar; one of the Pillars of Hercules
Moroccan - a native or inhabitant of Morocco
2.morocco - a soft pebble-grained leather made from goatskin; used for shoes and book bindings etc.
leather - an animal skin made smooth and flexible by removing the hair and then tanning
Levant, Levant morocco - a heavy morocco often used in bookbinding
Translations
Мароко
Maroko
Marokko
Maroko
Marokko
Maroko
Marokkó
モロッコ
모로코
Maroc
Maroko
Marocko
ประเทศโมร็อกโก
nước Maroc

Morocco

[məˈrɒkəʊ] NMarruecos m

morocco

[məˈrɒkəʊ] N (also morocco leather) → marroquí m, tafilete m

Morocco

[məˈrɒkəʊ] nMaroc m
in Morocco → au Maroc

Morocco

nMarokko nt

morocco

n (also morocco leather)Maroquin nt

Morocco

[məˈrɒkəʊ] n
a.il Marocco
b. (also Morocco leather) → marocchino

Morocco

الْـمَغْرِبُ Maroko Marokko Marokko Μαρόκο Marruecos Marokko Maroc Maroko Marocco モロッコ 모로코 Marokko Marokko Maroko Marrocos Марокко Marocko ประเทศโมร็อกโก Fas nước Maroc 摩洛哥
References in classic literature ?
He exhibited a daguerreotype miniature in a morocco case.
All the moral and Christian virtues bound in black Morocco, complete
He took a cigarette out of a dainty box, stuck it into a meerschaum holder which he carried in a morocco case, and reached for my cigar.
He soon stirred; my eye was instantly drawn to his movements; he only took out a morocco pocket-book, thence produced a letter, which he read in silence, folded it, put it back, relapsed into meditation.
Until the last few centuries, much of the world was probably what Morocco is to-day--a region without wheeled vehicles or even roads of any sort.
There was no country on the face of the globe he had not seen, nor battle he had not been engaged in; he had killed more Moors than there are in Morocco and Tunis, and fought more single combats, according to his own account, than Garcilaso, Diego Garcia de Paredes and a thousand others he named, and out of all he had come victorious without losing a drop of blood.
There, on a table, surrounded at some distance by a large and luxurious divan, every species of tobacco known, -- from the yellow tobacco of Petersburg to the black of Sinai, and so on along the scale from Maryland and Porto-Rico, to Latakia, -- was exposed in pots of crackled earthenware of which the Dutch are so fond; beside them, in boxes of fragrant wood, were ranged, according to their size and quality, pueros, regalias, havanas, and manillas; and, in an open cabinet, a collection of German pipes, of chibouques, with their amber mouth-pieces ornamented with coral, and of narghiles, with their long tubes of morocco, awaiting the caprice or the sympathy of the smokers.
A great-coat, that was abundantly ornamented by a profusion of furs, enveloped the whole of his figure excepting the head, which was covered with a cap of mar ten-skins lined with morocco, the sides of which were made to fall, if necessary, and were now drawn close over the ears and fastened beneath his chin with a black rib bon.
On returning, he found that Horner had disappeared, that the bureau had been forced open, and that the small morocco casket in which, as it afterwards transpired, the Countess was accustomed to keep her jewel, was lying empty upon the dressing-table.
Inside was a case of morocco leather, on the top of which lay a note and a key.
Then I heard a dull little snap, as though he had shut some small morocco case; whatever it was, he tossed it carelessly back into the bureau; and next minute he was really gone, leaving the candle burning on the floor.
In former times the Morocco rascals used to coast along the Spanish Main in their boats till a safe opportunity seemed to present itself, and then dart in and capture a Spanish village and carry off all the pretty women they could find.