morose


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mo·rose

 (mə-rōs′, mô-)
adj.
Sullenly melancholy; gloomy.

[Latin mōrōsus, peevish, from mōs, mōr-, self-will, caprice, manner; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

mo·rose′ly adv.
mo·rose′ness n.

morose

(məˈrəʊs)
adj
ill-tempered or gloomy
[C16: from Latin mōrōsus peevish, capricious, from mōs custom, will, caprice]
moˈrosely adv
moˈroseness, moˈrosity n

mo•rose

(məˈroʊs)

adj.
1. gloomily or sullenly ill-humored, as a person or mood.
2. characterized by or expressing gloom: a morose silence.
[1555–65; < Latin mōrōsus fretful, peevish, willful =mōr- (s. of mōs) will, inclination + -ōsus -ose1]
mo•rose′ly, adv.
mo•rose′ness, mo•ros•i•ty (məˈrɒs ɪ ti) n.
syn: See glum.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.morose - showing a brooding ill humor; "a dark scowl"; "the proverbially dour New England Puritan"; "a glum, hopeless shrug"; "he sat in moody silence"; "a morose and unsociable manner"; "a saturnine, almost misanthropic young genius"- Bruce Bliven; "a sour temper"; "a sullen crowd"
ill-natured - having an irritable and unpleasant disposition

morose

morose

adjective
Broodingly and sullenly unhappy:
Translations
كَئيب
zasmušilý
gnaventungsindig
drungalegur, önuglegur, fÿlulegur
drūms, nerunīgs

morose

[məˈrəʊs] ADJmalhumorado

morose

[məˈrəʊs] adjmorose, maussade

morose

adj, morosely

morose

[məˈrəʊs] adjcupo/a, tetro/a, imbronciato/a

morose

(məˈrəus) adjective
angry and silent.
moˈrosely adverb
moˈroseness noun
References in classic literature ?
In time I grew morose and consciously disagreeable, and resolved in my madness to return to San Francisco the next day.
He recalled the violent scene which he had just witnessed in part; that the gypsy was struggling with two men, that Quasimodo had a companion; and the morose and haughty face of the archdeacon passed confusedly through his memory.
Because he was morose and solitary, having nothing to do with the other dogs, he was unusually fitted to guard his master's property; and in this he was encouraged and trained by Grey Beaver.
He is a dark- skinned gipsy in aspect, in dress and manners a gentleman: that is, as much a gentleman as many a country squire: rather slovenly, perhaps, yet not looking amiss with his negligence, because he has an erect and handsome figure; and rather morose.
He had been there often, during a whole year, and had always been the same moody and morose lounger there.
He had been in a morose mood, ever since his dear wife's death.
I assure you, my darling, that I almost shed tears when I read that Virin so took to drink as to lose his memory, become morose, and spend whole days over his liquor; as also that he choked with grief and wept bitterly when, rubbing his eyes with his dirty hand, he bethought him of his wandering lamb, his daughter Dunasha
He was a strange wayward being, moody, fitful, and melancholy--at times almost morose.
He watched the play with an abstracted mind, trying to give himself gaiety by drinking whiskey in each interval; he was unused to alcohol, and it affected him quickly, but his drunkenness was savage and morose.
His strange life had left him neither morose nor bloodthirsty.
As soon, however, as his hunger was appeased, the king became morose and overgloomed again; the more so in proportion to the satisfaction he fancied he had previously manifested, and particularly on account of the deferential manner which his courtiers had shown towards Fouquet.
A morose soldier marching on the left turned his eyes on Bagration as he shouted, with an expression that seemed to say: "We know that ourselves