morose


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mo·rose

 (mə-rōs′, mô-)
adj.
Sullenly melancholy; gloomy.

[Latin mōrōsus, peevish, from mōs, mōr-, self-will, caprice, manner; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

mo·rose′ly adv.
mo·rose′ness n.

morose

(məˈrəʊs)
adj
ill-tempered or gloomy
[C16: from Latin mōrōsus peevish, capricious, from mōs custom, will, caprice]
moˈrosely adv
moˈroseness, moˈrosity n

mo•rose

(məˈroʊs)

adj.
1. gloomily or sullenly ill-humored, as a person or mood.
2. characterized by or expressing gloom: a morose silence.
[1555–65; < Latin mōrōsus fretful, peevish, willful =mōr- (s. of mōs) will, inclination + -ōsus -ose1]
mo•rose′ly, adv.
mo•rose′ness, mo•ros•i•ty (məˈrɒs ɪ ti) n.
syn: See glum.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.morose - showing a brooding ill humor; "a dark scowl"; "the proverbially dour New England Puritan"; "a glum, hopeless shrug"; "he sat in moody silence"; "a morose and unsociable manner"; "a saturnine, almost misanthropic young genius"- Bruce Bliven; "a sour temper"; "a sullen crowd"
ill-natured - having an irritable and unpleasant disposition

morose

morose

adjective
Broodingly and sullenly unhappy:
Translations
كَئيب
zasmušilý
gnaventungsindig
drungalegur, önuglegur, fÿlulegur
drūms, nerunīgs

morose

[məˈrəʊs] ADJmalhumorado

morose

[məˈrəʊs] adjmorose, maussade

morose

adj, morosely

morose

[məˈrəʊs] adjcupo/a, tetro/a, imbronciato/a

morose

(məˈrəus) adjective
angry and silent.
moˈrosely adverb
moˈroseness noun
References in classic literature ?
Some do not, and that is trying," observed Aunt March, looking over her spectacles at Jo, who sat apart, rocking herself, with a somewhat morose expression.
From childhood she had been inclined to fits of temper and when not angry she was often morose and si- lent.
ejaculated a voice; not that of Miss Miller, but one of the upper teachers, a little and dark personage, smartly dressed, but of somewhat morose aspect, who installed herself at the top of one table, while a more buxom lady presided at the other.
He is a dark- skinned gipsy in aspect, in dress and manners a gentleman: that is, as much a gentleman as many a country squire: rather slovenly, perhaps, yet not looking amiss with his negligence, because he has an erect and handsome figure; and rather morose.
He had been there often, during a whole year, and had always been the same moody and morose lounger there.
That minister was GALBET, or admiral of the realm, very much in his master's confidence, and a person well versed in affairs, but of a morose and sour complexion.
Yet it was not this alone that made him gloomy and morose.
He had been in a morose mood, ever since his dear wife's death.
He was too weak to work and too morose for company, and so they quickly left him alone to his own devices.
Every day he grew more morose and discontented and irritable; every day his character kept changing for the worse.
I have mentioned his dark locks--they were brushed sideways above a white and sufficiently expansive forehead; his cheek had a rather hectic freshness; his features might have done well on canvas, but indifferently in marble: they were plastic; character had set a stamp upon each; expression re-cast them at her pleasure, and strange metamorphoses she wrought, giving him now the mien of a morose bull, and anon that of an arch and mischievous girl; more frequently, the two semblances were blent, and a queer, composite countenance they made.
He was a strange wayward being, moody, fitful, and melancholy--at times almost morose.