morpheme


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Related to morpheme: free morpheme

mor·pheme

 (môr′fēm′)
n.
A meaningful linguistic unit that cannot be divided into smaller meaningful parts. The word man and the suffix -ed (as in walked) are morphemes.

[French morphème, blend of Greek morphē, form and French phonème, phoneme; see phoneme.]

mor·phem′ic adj.
mor·phem′i·cal·ly adv.

morpheme

(ˈmɔːfiːm)
n
(Linguistics) linguistics a speech element having a meaning or grammatical function that cannot be subdivided into further such elements
[C20: from French, from Greek morphē form, coined on the model of phoneme; see -eme]
morˈphemic adj
morˈphemically adv

mor•pheme

(ˈmɔr fim)

n.
any of the minimal grammatical units of a language, each constituting a word or meaningful part of a word that cannot be divided into smaller meaningful parts, as the, write, or the -ed of waited. Compare allomorph (def. 2).
[1895–1900; < French morphème; see morph-, -eme]
mor•phe′mic, adj.
mor•phe′mi•cal•ly, adv.

morpheme

A word or part of a word that cannot be further divided into smaller elements.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.morpheme - minimal meaningful language unit; it cannot be divided into smaller meaningful units
language unit, linguistic unit - one of the natural units into which linguistic messages can be analyzed
allomorph - a variant phonological representation of a morpheme; "the final sounds of `bets' and `beds' and `horses' and `oxen' are allomorphs of the English plural morpheme"
free form, free morpheme - a morpheme that can occur alone
bound form, bound morpheme - a morpheme that occurs only as part of a larger construction; eg an -s at the end of plural nouns
classifier - a word or morpheme used in some languages in certain contexts (such as counting) to indicate the semantic class to which the counted item belongs
ending, termination - the end of a word (a suffix or inflectional ending or final morpheme); "I don't like words that have -ism as an ending"
Translations
морфема
morfém
morfeemi
morfem
morféma
morfemaморфема
morfem
морфема

morpheme

[ˈmɔːfiːm] Nmorfema m

morpheme

nMorphem nt

morpheme

[ˈmɔːfiːm] nmorfema m
References in periodicals archive ?
If a morpheme has more than one syllable, its corresponding syllables, consonants, and vowels are concatenated by dashes.
Scholars from the US and France address Ferdinand de SaussureAEs influence on descriptive and historical analysis in historical linguistics; the connection between inflectional paradigms as an occasional determinant of sound change; the nature of the phoneme and morpheme to arrive at an intermediate entity, the morpho(pho)neme; a framework for examining the modification of morpho-syntactic categories and the rise of new patterns to express them; and language change in contemporary linguistics communities.
Libben and Weber (2014, see also Sahel, Nottbusch, Grimm, & Weingarten 2008) found that the typing latencies are longer for the letter after the morpheme boundary than for the letter prior to the morpheme boundary.
b) Affixation: This involves the insertion of morphemes to a root word; that is forming morphologically complex words by the addition of morpheme(s) to the base, illustrated in the following sketch:
This morpheme is homophonous, if not historically identical with the morpheme of the singular 2nd person imperative.
Thus, a morpheme is typically a syllabic (occasionally polysyllabic) component of a polysyllabic word.
Similarly, it is important for children to know that words like product and produce are related because the same morpheme is used to indicate a related meaning, even though the sound changes.
Then, we have to identify the root word of each and every word present in the given input Tamil text and then we have to identify the morpheme components.
The vowel phoneme, represented by the letter /o/ in the first morpheme (word part), changes from a long vowel to a schwa (reduced) vowel.
For example, the word nation is a morpheme and it can be grouped with nation-al, inter-nation-al-lise and inter-national-al-is-sation.
eer) did not correspond to a morpheme and, consequently, these words did not appear to have a compound-like structure.
Daryl explains: "A brief example of the work we're doing can be explained by the morpheme 'AC.