morphophonology

(redirected from morphophonological)

morphophonology

(ˌmɔːfəʊfəˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Linguistics) linguistics the study of the phonemic shape and the phonological representation of a language's morphemes
References in periodicals archive ?
For these models agreement occurs at grammatical encoding level and is impervious to semantic and morphophonological influence.
African Anthroponymy: An Ethnopragmatic and Morphophonological Study of Personal Names in Akan and Some African Societies.
However, an independent prolative marker et'i also exists in the dialect, appearing in a small number of cases under certain morphophonological conditions (e.
In other terms, it is an upgrading, a movement in reverse, on the syntactic, morphophonological and semantic hierarchies used to describe the more frequent grammaticalization processes.
Lexical creations, on their part, are adaptations of L1 words to the L2 morphophonological rules (cf.
This development was due to a morphophonological reanalysis or metanalysis that also led to the development of suffixes beginning with /tt/.
The researcher analysed both sets with a dual focus on correct spelling and on spelling approximations which gave a rich and multifaceted picture of children's developing understandings of morphophonological structure.
However, this does not obscure the status of the stem-formative as such; it is merely that its morphophonological exponence, and so spelling, is systematically diversified, in response to whatever inflectional categories are also being expressed in the particular form.
It has pitch accent and phonemic segment length, complex and numerous morphophonological regularities, and an intricate polysynthetic morphology (Frantz 1970, 2009; Taylor 1969; Uhlenbeck 1938).
1 features a map of the location of Thangmi-speaking communities in Nepal; a description and analysis of the language's morphophonological and other features; summary of previous scholarship; and figures and tables with demographic, grammatical, and kinship information.
This information must be visible in word order, morphophonological and prosodic patterns (a language internal syntax/phonology interface being assumed), and in syntactic relations that can be semantically interpreted in a compositional basis (a language internal syntax/semantic interface being assumed).
Kastovsky (1986, 1989, 1990, 2005, 2006) has dealt with zero derivation, affixation and compounding from the point of view of the typological shift identifiable in Old English from variable base morphology to invariable morphology, to reach the conclusion that by the end of the Old English period morphophonological alternations do not play any role in the formation of new words.