morsel


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mor·sel

 (môr′səl)
n.
1. A small piece of food.
2. A tasty delicacy; a tidbit.
3. A small amount; a piece: a morsel of gossip.
4. One that is delightful and extremely pleasing.

[Middle English, from Old French, diminutive of mors, bite, from Latin morsum, from neuter past participle of mordēre, to bite; see mer- in Indo-European roots.]

morsel

(ˈmɔːsəl)
n
1. (Cookery) a small slice or mouthful of food
2. a small piece; bit
3. informal Irish a term of endearment for a child
[C13: from Old French, from mors a bite, from Latin morsus, from mordēre to bite]

mor•sel

(ˈmɔr səl)

n.
1. a small portion of food; bite.
2. a small piece or amount of anything; scrap; bit.
3. an appetizing dish; treat.
4. one that is attractive or delightful.
v.t.
5. to distribute in or divide into tiny portions (often fol. by out).
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French, =mors a bite + -el < Latin -ellus]

Morsel

 a small quantity—Johnson, 1755.
Examples: morsel of feeling, 1860; of quicksilver ore, 1839; of territory, 1860.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.morsel - a small quantity of anything; "a morsel of paper was all he needed"
small indefinite amount, small indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is below average size or magnitude
2.morsel - a small amount of solid foodmorsel - a small amount of solid food; a mouthful; "all they had left was a bit of bread"
mouthful, taste - a small amount eaten or drunk; "take a taste--you'll like it"
chaw, chew, cud, plug, quid, wad - a wad of something chewable as tobacco
crumb - small piece of e.g. bread or cake
sop, sops - piece of solid food for dipping in a liquid

morsel

noun piece, bite, bit, slice, scrap, part, grain, taste, segment, fragment, fraction, snack, crumb, nibble, mouthful, tad (informal, chiefly U.S.), titbit, soupçon (French) a delicious little morsel of meat

morsel

noun
1. A small portion of food:
Informal: bite.
2. A light meal:
3. Something fine and delicious, especially a food:
Informal: goody.
Translations
لُقْمَه
sousto
bid
biti
gabaliukaskąsnelis
kumosiņš, gabaliņš
sústo

morsel

[ˈmɔːsl] N [of food] → bocado m (fig) → pedazo m

morsel

[ˈmɔːrsəl] n [food] → bouchée f

morsel

n (of food)Bissen m, → Happen m; (fig)bisschen nt; (of information)Brocken m; not a morsel of foodkein Bissen zu essen; a morsel of comfortein kleiner Trost

morsel

[ˈmɔːsl] n (of food) → boccone m (fig) → briciolo

morsel

(ˈmoːsəl) noun
a small piece of something, especially food. a tasty morsel of fish for the cat.
References in classic literature ?
Early in this trick once when the steward had left the room and Michael's eager nose was within an inch of the prohibited morsel, Kwaque, playfully inclined, reached for the morsel himself and received a lacerated hand from the quick flash and clip of Michael's jaws.
The choice morsel had been judiciously separated from the adjoining and less worthy parts of the beast, and, enveloped in the hairy coating provided by nature, it had duly undergone the heat of the customary subterraneous oven, and was now laid before its proprietors in all the culinary glory of the prairies.
I have always heard say that a nightingale on toast is dainty morsel.
I looked round, and discovered a poorly clad little boy, with a basket over his arm, and a morsel of paper in his hand.
No asking your way of the sun, when you are lost, with a little brass instrument and a morsel of pencil and paper.
To this species of medical treatment, however, I would by no means accede, much as he insisted upon it; and so we partook of our usual morsel, and silently resumed our journey.
The lucky individual whose name was called, snapped up the morsel thrown towards him, but none of the others moved a muscle.
However, the wolf thought he was in joke, and came one night to get a dainty morsel.
and the old man licked his thin lips as though to taste the last sweet vestige of some dainty morsel.
But one little comfort helped me to bear my heart-ache resignedly--a stolen morsel of Eustace's hair.
We have not," says she, "had a morsel to eat, nor have these poor children had a rag to put on, but what his goodness hath bestowed on us.
I scored the bit about the Child with my pencil, and put a morsel of paper for a mark to keep the place; "Lie you there," I said, "till the marriage of Mr.