morsel


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

mor·sel

 (môr′səl)
n.
1. A small piece of food.
2. A tasty delicacy; a tidbit.
3. A small amount; a piece: a morsel of gossip.
4. One that is delightful and extremely pleasing.

[Middle English, from Old French, diminutive of mors, bite, from Latin morsum, from neuter past participle of mordēre, to bite; see mer- in Indo-European roots.]

morsel

(ˈmɔːsəl)
n
1. (Cookery) a small slice or mouthful of food
2. a small piece; bit
3. informal Irish a term of endearment for a child
[C13: from Old French, from mors a bite, from Latin morsus, from mordēre to bite]

mor•sel

(ˈmɔr səl)

n.
1. a small portion of food; bite.
2. a small piece or amount of anything; scrap; bit.
3. an appetizing dish; treat.
4. one that is attractive or delightful.
v.t.
5. to distribute in or divide into tiny portions (often fol. by out).
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French, =mors a bite + -el < Latin -ellus]

Morsel

 a small quantity—Johnson, 1755.
Examples: morsel of feeling, 1860; of quicksilver ore, 1839; of territory, 1860.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.morsel - a small quantity of anything; "a morsel of paper was all he needed"
small indefinite amount, small indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is below average size or magnitude
2.morsel - a small amount of solid foodmorsel - a small amount of solid food; a mouthful; "all they had left was a bit of bread"
mouthful, taste - a small amount eaten or drunk; "take a taste--you'll like it"
chaw, chew, cud, plug, quid, wad - a wad of something chewable as tobacco
crumb - small piece of e.g. bread or cake
sop, sops - piece of solid food for dipping in a liquid

morsel

noun piece, bite, bit, slice, scrap, part, grain, taste, segment, fragment, fraction, snack, crumb, nibble, mouthful, tad (informal, chiefly U.S.), titbit, soupçon (French) a delicious little morsel of meat

morsel

noun
1. A small portion of food:
Informal: bite.
2. A light meal:
3. Something fine and delicious, especially a food:
Informal: goody.
Translations
لُقْمَه
sousto
bid
biti
gabaliukaskąsnelis
kumosiņš, gabaliņš
sústo

morsel

[ˈmɔːsl] N [of food] → bocado m (fig) → pedazo m

morsel

[ˈmɔːrsəl] n [food] → bouchée f

morsel

n (of food)Bissen m, → Happen m; (fig)bisschen nt; (of information)Brocken m; not a morsel of foodkein Bissen zu essen; a morsel of comfortein kleiner Trost

morsel

[ˈmɔːsl] n (of food) → boccone m (fig) → briciolo

morsel

(ˈmoːsəl) noun
a small piece of something, especially food. a tasty morsel of fish for the cat.
References in classic literature ?
added Jo, who could not, for the life of her, help getting a morsel of fun out of the little sermon, though she took it to heart as much as any of them.
asked Edna, seeing that her husband arose from table without having eaten a morsel except a taste of the highly-seasoned soup.
A Pyncheon must not, at all events under her forefathers' roof, receive money for a morsel of bread from her only friend
Dimmesdale so evidently was, to eat his unsavoury morsel always at another's board, and endure the life-long chill which must be his lot who seeks to warm himself only at another's fireside, it truly seemed that this sagacious, experienced, benevolent old physician, with his concord of paternal and reverential love for the young pastor, was the very man, of all mankind, to be constantly within reach of his voice.
Ichahod Crane had a soft and foolish heart towards the sex; and it is not to be wondered at, that so tempting a morsel soon found favor in his eyes, more especially after he had visited her in her paternal mansion.
This second morsel, as I watched her, she was very markedly and intently attempting to tighten in its place.
Cook, said Stubb, rapidly lifting a rather reddish morsel to his mouth, don't you think this steak is rather overdone?
I found a comfortable seat for the king by the road- side, and then gave him a morsel or two to stay his stomach with.
He bullied and punished me; not two or three times in the week, nor once or twice in the day, but continually: every nerve I had feared him, and every morsel of flesh in my bones shrank when he came near.
Catherine's library was select, and its state of dilapidation proved it to have been well used, though not altogether for a legitimate purpose: scarcely one chapter had escaped, a pen-and-ink commentary - at least the appearance of one - covering every morsel of blank that the printer had left.
No more harmless morsel of pasteboard was ever passed from one hand to another.
My petition is, that a morsel of stone or wood, with my husband's name, may be placed over him to show where he lies.