mortalism


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mortalism

the philosophic doctrine that claims that the soul is mortal. — mortalist, n.
See also: Philosophy
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For Corbett, Dante's Epicurus is at once a positive figure for the noble secular unbeliever, ordering his earthly life according to reason, virtue and an understanding of the natural world while at the same time also a negative figure insomuch as he represents the doctrine of mortalism, which is entirely at odds with Dante's Christian faith.
He compares this reception to Dante's understanding of the secular and spiritual hemisphere of Inferno X, then compares Epicurean mortalism and Christian faith, in which he finds equivalent values.
There was a revealing instance when the archbishop interviewed Peter Peckard, the future master of Magdalene College, Cambridge, and dean of Peterborough, obliging him to submit utterly to Seeker's condemnation of mortalism.
Their atomisms were no more an 'Epicurean idea' than was Pomponazzi's mortalism.
Nietzsche's affinity for the Dionysian over the Apollonian also registers a more flexible, multivalent sense of self than that of mortalism, a shamanic sense shared with the Greek mystery religions for which death is a doorway.
However, the array also helps us to recognize mortalism as an almost entirely Western concept, certainly confined to a restricted and individualistic notion of self that is the legacy of the Western tradition.
The Soul Sleepers: Christian Mortalism from Wycliffe to Priestley.
Another reason, doubtless, has to do with the doctrinal trickiness of the subject: mortalism presents itself in distinguishable strands, but it is often a fine scantling that separates one strand from another, and there may be difficulties in determining whether a given mortalist voice utters on behalf of the soul's "sleep" or the soul's "death.
Initially, Muggletonianism is characterized in seventeen assertions encompassing pacifism, new interpretations of hell, angels, the Elect, and the Serpent, a new form of dispensations, a vehement anticlericalism, and a redrawn eschatology that emphasized mortalism.
Waddington makes a case for Milton's mortalism in "Murder One: the Death of Abel.
Familis--so named from the late-sixteenth-century "Family of Love," founded by the Dutch mystic Hendrik Niclaes--was a discrete strand of antinomianism whose practitioners occupied themselves, most shockingly for their puritan enemies, with heretical doctrines such as mortalism, deification, and perfectibility, and with Spirit-borne revelations that superseded the text of scripture and overturned the canons of social propriety.