mortifying


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mor·ti·fy

 (môr′tə-fī′)
v. mor·ti·fied, mor·ti·fy·ing, mor·ti·fies
v.tr.
1. To cause to experience shame, humiliation, or wounded pride.
2. To discipline (one's of the body and the appetites) by self-denial or self-inflicted privation, especially for religious reasons.
v.intr.
1. To practice mortification of the body and its appetites.
2. To undergo mortification; become gangrenous.

[Middle English mortifien, to deaden, subdue, from Old French mortifier, from Latin mortificāre, to kill : mors, mort-, death; see mer- in Indo-European roots + -ficāre, -fy.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.mortifying - causing to feel shame or chagrin or vexation; "the embarrassing moment when she found her petticoat down around her ankles"; "it was mortifying to know he had heard every word"
unpleasant - disagreeable to the senses, to the mind, or feelings ; "an unpleasant personality"; "unpleasant repercussions"; "unpleasant odors"
2.mortifying - causing awareness of your shortcomings; "golf is a humbling game"
undignified - lacking dignity
Translations
مُذِل، مُؤْلِم للنَّفْس
pokořující
zahanbujúci
küçük düşürücüutandırıcı

mortifying

[ˈmɔːtɪfaɪɪŋ] ADJhumillante

mortifying

[ˈmɔːrtɪfaɪɪŋ] adjhorriblement gênant(e)mortise lock [ˈmɔːrtɪs] nserrure f encastrée

mortifying

adj, mortifyingly
advbeschämend; (= embarrassing)peinlich

mortifying

[ˈmɔːtɪˌfaɪɪŋ] adjmortificante

mortify

(ˈmoː(r)tifai) verb
be/feel mortified to be/feel extremely embarrassed or humiliated: He was mortified when she slapped him.
mortifying adjective
How mortifying for you!
ˌmortifiˈcation (-fi-) noun
References in classic literature ?
Now if there is anything mortifying to out feelings when we are young, it is to be told that, and to be bidden to "run away, dear" is still more trying to us.
In this mortifying abasement, the colonists, though innocent of her imbecility, and too humble to be the agents of her blunders, were but the natural participators.
He stopped, and added, after a moment's mortifying reflection, "I've been brought up in the woods, Miss Carr, and I suppose I have followed my feelings, instead of the etiquette of society.
She had been saved from foolishness and error; kept from troubling her poor mother; prevented from angering and mortifying her aunts.
That her sister's affections WERE calm, she dared not deny, though she blushed to acknowledge it; and of the strength of her own, she gave a very striking proof, by still loving and respecting that sister, in spite of this mortifying conviction.
The unhealthy nature of the site; the quantity and quality of the children's food; the brackish, fetid water used in its preparation; the pupils' wretched clothing and accommodations--all these things were discovered, and the discovery produced a result mortifying to Mr.
I've said I did not love her, and rather relished mortifying her vanity now and then: besides, she hurt me extremely; so I started up from my knees, and screamed out, 'Oh, Miss, that's a nasty trick
He finished his cigar with the mortifying conviction that he was totally unprepared for Mrs.
Besides being possessed by my sister's idea that a mortifying and penitential character ought to be imparted to my diet - besides giving me as much crumb as possible in combination with as little butter, and putting such a quantity of warm water into my milk that it would have been more candid to have left the milk out altogether - his conversation consisted of nothing but arithmetic.
For the opposite reason, Prince John hated and contemned the few Saxon families of consequence which subsisted in England, and omitted no opportunity of mortifying and affronting them; being conscious that his person and pretensions were disliked by them, as well as by the greater part of the English commons, who feared farther innovation upon their rights and liberties, from a sovereign of John's licentious and tyrannical disposition.
He was stung by this repulse, and stood mortifying himself by thinking of it until he was disturbed by the entrance of a maid-servant.