moss


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moss

 (môs, mŏs)
n.
1.
a. Any of various green, usually small, nonvascular plants of the division Bryophyta, having leaflike structures arranged around the stem and spores borne in a capsule.
b. A patch or covering of such plants.
2. Any of various other unrelated plants having a similar appearance or manner of growth, such as Irish moss, Spanish moss, and the club mosses.
tr.v. mossed, moss·ing, moss·es
To cover with moss.

[Middle English, from Old English mos, bog, and from Medieval Latin mossa, moss (of Germanic origin).]

moss

(mɒs)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: mossplant any bryophyte of the phylum Bryophyta, typically growing in dense mats on trees, rocks, moist ground, etc. See also peat moss
2. (Plants) a clump or growth of any of these plants
3. (Plants) any of various similar but unrelated plants, such as club moss, Spanish moss, Ceylon moss, rose moss, and reindeer moss
4. (Physical Geography) Scot and Northern English a peat bog or marsh
[Old English mos swamp; compare Middle Dutch, Old High German mos bog, Old Norse mosi; compare also Old Norse mӯrr mire]
ˈmossˌlike adj
ˈmossy adj
ˈmossiness n

Moss

(mɒs)
n
1. (Biography) Kate. born 1974, British supermodel.
2. (Biography) Sir Stirling. born 1929, English racing driver

moss

(mɔs, mɒs)
n.
1. any tiny, leafy-stemmed, filamentous bryophyte of the class Musci, growing in tufts, sods, or mats on moist ground, tree trunks, rocks, etc.
2. a growth of such plants.
3. any of various similar plants, as Iceland moss or club moss.
v.t.
4. to cover with a growth of moss.
[before 1000; Middle English mos(se), Old English mos moss, bog; akin to German Moos, Old Norse mȳrr mire]
moss′like`, adj.

moss

(môs)
1. Any of numerous small, green plants that lack vascular tissue and do not bear seeds. Mosses usually live in moist, shady areas and grow in clusters or mats on the ground, rocks, and tree trunks.
2. Any of a number of plants that look like mosses but are not related to them. For instance, reindeer moss is a lichen, Irish moss is an alga, and Spanish moss is a flowering plant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moss - tiny leafy-stemmed flowerless plantsmoss - tiny leafy-stemmed flowerless plants
bryophyte, nonvascular plant - any of numerous plants of the division Bryophyta
acrocarp, acrocarpous moss - a moss in which the main axis is terminated by the archegonium (and hence the capsule)
pleurocarp, pleurocarpous moss - a moss having the archegonium or antheridium on a short side branch rather than the main stalk
bog moss, peat moss, sphagnum, sphagnum moss - any of various pale or ashy mosses of the genus Sphagnum whose decomposed remains form peat
Translations
طُحْلُبطُحْلُبٌ
mech
mos
musgoaljdlfajijfiefchaifeeee
sambliksammalsammalduma
sammalsammaloitua
טחבי עלים
mahovina
moha
lumut
mosi
muschiomusco
コケ
이끼
samaninissamanossamanotas
sūna
mach
mah
mossa
พืชตะไคร่น้ำ
rêu

moss

[mɒs]
A. N (Bot) → musgo m
see also rolling A
B. CPD moss stitch Npunto m de musgo

moss

[ˈmɒs] nmousse f

moss

nMoos nt

moss

[mɒs] n (Bot) → muschio

moss

(mos) noun
(any variety of) a type of small flowerless plant, found in damp places, forming a soft green covering on tree trunks etc. The bank of the river was covered in moss.
ˈmossy adjective

moss

طُحْلُبٌ mech mos Moos βρύο musgo sammal mousse mahovina muschio コケ 이끼 mos mose mech musgo мох mossa พืชตะไคร่น้ำ yosun rêu 青苔
References in classic literature ?
Laurie dug a grave under the ferns in the grove, little Pip was laid in, with many tears by his tender-hearted mistress, and covered with moss, while a wreath of violets and chickweed was hung on the stone which bore his epitaph, composed by Jo while she struggled with the dinner.
She beat the moss down impatiently, and muttered to herself sullenly.
said the scout, shaking his head doubtingly; "When the sun is scorching the tree tops, and the water courses are full; when the moss on every beech he sees will tell him in what quarter the north star will shine at night.
They have filled some flour sacks with clean dry moss from the woods, and put half a dozen blankets on the top, and they hope you can get along until the messenger who starts to-night for La Grange can bring some bedding over.
It would be an omission, trifling, indeed, but unpardonable, were we to forget the green moss that had long since gathered over the projections of the windows, and on the slopes of the roof nor must we fail to direct the reader's eye to a crop, not of weeds, but flower-shrubs, which were growing aloft in the air, not a great way from the chimney, in the nook between two of the gables.
Doubtless, however, either of these stern and black-browed Puritans would have thought it quite a sufficient retribution for his sins that, after so long a lapse of years, the old trunk of the family tree, with so much venerable moss upon it, should have borne, as its topmost bough, an idler like myself.
Gaining the more open water, the bracing breeze waxed fresh; the little Moss tossed the quick foam from her bows, as a young colt his snortings.
The slanting light of the setting sun quivers on the sea-like expanse of the river; the shivery canes, and the tall, dark cypress, hung with wreaths of dark, funereal moss, glow in the golden ray, as the heavily-laden steamboat marches onward.
The stems of the trees are trim and straight, and in many places all the ground is hidden for miles under a thick cushion of moss of a vivid green color, with not a decayed or ragged spot in its surface, and not a fallen leaf or twig to mar its immaculate tidiness.
Each of these pretty homes had a garden in front fenced with white palings and opulently stocked with hollyhocks, marigolds, touch-me-nots, prince's-feathers, and other old-fashioned flowers; while on the windowsills of the houses stood wooden boxes containing moss rose plants and terra-cotta pots in which grew a breed of geranium whose spread of intensely red blossoms accented the prevailing pink tint of the rose-clad house-front like an explosion of flame.
It exactly answers my idea of a fine country, because it unites beauty with utility--and I dare say it is a picturesque one too, because you admire it; I can easily believe it to be full of rocks and promontories, grey moss and brush wood, but these are all lost on me.
And now vegetation matured with vigour; Lowood shook loose its tresses; it became all green, all flowery; its great elm, ash, and oak skeletons were restored to majestic life; woodland plants sprang up profusely in its recesses; unnumbered varieties of moss filled its hollows, and it made a strange ground-sunshine out of the wealth of its wild primrose plants: I have seen their pale gold gleam in overshadowed spots like scatterings of the sweetest lustre.