motion


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Related to motion: Laws of motion, Uniform motion

mo·tion

 (mō′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of changing position or place.
2. A meaningful or expressive change in the position of the body or a part of the body; a gesture.
3. Active operation: set the plan in motion.
4. The ability or power to move: lost motion in his arm.
5. The manner in which the body moves, as in walking.
6. A prompting from within; an impulse or inclination: resigned of her own motion.
7. Music Melodic ascent and descent of pitch.
8. Law An application made to a court for an order or a ruling.
9. A formal proposal put to the vote under parliamentary procedures.
10.
a. A mechanical device or piece of machinery that moves or causes motion; a mechanism.
b. The movement or action of such a device.
v. mo·tioned, mo·tion·ing, mo·tions
v.tr.
1. To direct by making a gesture: motioned us to our seats.
2. To indicate by making a gesture; signal: motioned that he was ready.
3. To make a motion (that something should happen).
v.intr.
To signal by making a gesture: motioned to her to enter.
Idiom:
go through the motions
To do something in a mechanical manner indicative of a lack of interest or involvement.

[Middle English mocioun, from Old French motion, from Latin mōtiō, mōtiōn-, from mōtus, past participle of movēre, to move; see meuə- in Indo-European roots.]

Motion

(ˈməʊʃən)
n
(Biography) Sir Andrew. born 1952, British poet and biographer; his collections include Pleasure Steamers (1978) and Public Property (2002): poet laureate (1999–2009)

Motion

(ˈməʊʃən)
n
(Biography) Sir Andrew. born 1952, British poet and biographer; his collections include Pleasure Steamers (1978) and Public Property (2002): poet laureate (1999–2009)

mo•tion

(ˈmoʊ ʃən)

n.
1. the action or process of moving or of changing place or position; movement.
2. power of movement, as of a living body.
3. the manner of moving the body in walking; gait.
4. a bodily movement or change of posture; gesture.
5. a formal proposal, esp. one made to a deliberative assembly.
6. an application made to a court or judge for an order, ruling, or the like.
7. an inward prompting or impulse; inclination.
8. melodic progression from one pitch to another.
9. Mach.
a. a piece of mechanism with a particular action or function.
b. the action of such a mechanism.
10. in motion, in active operation; moving.
v.t.
11. to direct by a significant motion or gesture, as with the hand.
v.i.
12. to make a meaningful motion, as with the hand.
[1350–1400; Middle English mocio(u)n < Latin mōtiō=mō-, variant s. of movēre to move + -tiō -tion]
mo′tion•less, adj.
mo′tion•less•ly, adv.
mo′tion•less•ness, n.

Motion

See also travel.

the tendency of some plants to grow in a direction away from the sun.
the tendency of some plants to grow away from the earth and the pull of gravity. — apogeotropic, adj.
slowness of movement. — bradykinetic, adj.
the property of some plants and animals of moving toward or away from certain chemicals.
growth or motion in response to a chemical stimulus. — chemotropic, adj.
the capacity or tendency of some plants to adopt a position transverse to the line of force of an external stimulus. — diatropic, adj.
kinetophobia.
growth or movement of an organism in response to an electric current. — galvanotropic, adj.
the movement of an organism in response to the force of gravity.
the study of the motion of bodies considered independently of external forces. Also called phoronomy. — kinematic, adj.
a mania for movement.
the branch of physics that studies the motion of masses in relation to the forces acting on them.
an abnormal fear or dislike of motion. Also called dromophobia.
kinematics.
movement of bodies, organisms, etc., in response to the stimulus of light. — photokinetic, adj.
the movement of an organism away from or toward a source of light. — phototactic, adj.
motion in a particular direction under the stimulus of light, as exhibited by certain plants, organisms, etc. — phototropic, adj.
the tendency of certain living things to move in response to the mechanical stimulus of a current of water.
orientation or movement of an organism in response to the stimulus of a solid object. Cf. stereotropism. — stereotactic, adj.
growth or movement determined by contact with a solid. Also called thigmotropism. Cf. stereotaxis. — stereotropic, adj.
an abnormal fear of speed.
stereotropism. — thigmotropic, adj.
Rare. the science of rotary motion. — trochilic, adj.
the movement of cells in relation to food or nutritive matter. — trophotropic, adj.
the tendency of a plant, animal, or part to move or turn in response to an external stimulus, as sunlight or temperature. — tropistic, adj.

motion


Past participle: motioned
Gerund: motioning

Imperative
motion
motion
Present
I motion
you motion
he/she/it motions
we motion
you motion
they motion
Preterite
I motioned
you motioned
he/she/it motioned
we motioned
you motioned
they motioned
Present Continuous
I am motioning
you are motioning
he/she/it is motioning
we are motioning
you are motioning
they are motioning
Present Perfect
I have motioned
you have motioned
he/she/it has motioned
we have motioned
you have motioned
they have motioned
Past Continuous
I was motioning
you were motioning
he/she/it was motioning
we were motioning
you were motioning
they were motioning
Past Perfect
I had motioned
you had motioned
he/she/it had motioned
we had motioned
you had motioned
they had motioned
Future
I will motion
you will motion
he/she/it will motion
we will motion
you will motion
they will motion
Future Perfect
I will have motioned
you will have motioned
he/she/it will have motioned
we will have motioned
you will have motioned
they will have motioned
Future Continuous
I will be motioning
you will be motioning
he/she/it will be motioning
we will be motioning
you will be motioning
they will be motioning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been motioning
you have been motioning
he/she/it has been motioning
we have been motioning
you have been motioning
they have been motioning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been motioning
you will have been motioning
he/she/it will have been motioning
we will have been motioning
you will have been motioning
they will have been motioning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been motioning
you had been motioning
he/she/it had been motioning
we had been motioning
you had been motioning
they had been motioning
Conditional
I would motion
you would motion
he/she/it would motion
we would motion
you would motion
they would motion
Past Conditional
I would have motioned
you would have motioned
he/she/it would have motioned
we would have motioned
you would have motioned
they would have motioned
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.motion - the use of movements (especially of the hands) to communicate familiar or prearranged signals
visual communication - communication that relies on vision
sign - a gesture that is part of a sign language
gesticulation - a deliberate and vigorous gesture or motion
beck - a beckoning gesture
facial expression, facial gesture - a gesture executed with the facial muscles
flourish - a showy gesture; "she entered with a great flourish"
high-five - a gesture of greeting or elation; one person's upraised palm slaps the upraised palm of another person
previous question - a motion calling for an immediate vote on the main question under discussion by a deliberative assembly
shrug - a gesture involving the shoulders
wafture, waving, wave - the act of signaling by a movement of the hand
V sign - a sign (for victory); making a V with the index and middle fingers
nod - a sign of assent or salutation or command
bowing, obeisance, bow - bending the head or body or knee as a sign of reverence or submission or shame or greeting
sign of the cross - a gesture with the right hand moving to form a cross; used by Catholics as a profession of faith
curtsey, curtsy - bending the knees; a gesture of respect made by women
2.motion - a natural event that involves a change in the position or location of somethingmotion - a natural event that involves a change in the position or location of something
happening, natural event, occurrence, occurrent - an event that happens
crustal movement, tectonic movement - movement resulting from or causing deformation of the earth's crust
approaching, approach - the event of one object coming closer to another
passing, passage - the motion of one object relative to another; "stellar passings can perturb the orbits of comets"
deflexion, deflection - the movement of the pointer or pen of a measuring instrument from its zero position
bending, bend - movement that causes the formation of a curve
change of location, travel - a movement through space that changes the location of something
undulation, wave - (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth
jitter - a small irregular movement
periodic motion, periodic movement - motion that recurs over and over and the period of time required for each recurrence remains the same
heave - (geology) a horizontal dislocation
backlash, rebound, recoil, repercussion - a movement back from an impact
recoil, kick - the backward jerk of a gun when it is fired
seek - the movement of a read/write head to a specific data track on a disk
wring, squeeze - a twisting squeeze; "gave the wet cloth a wring"
cam stroke, stroke, throw - the maximum movement available to a pivoted or reciprocating piece by a cam
turning, turn - a movement in a new direction; "the turning of the wind"
wrench, twist - a jerky pulling movement
undulation - wavelike motion; a gentle rising and falling in the manner of waves
moving ridge, wave - one of a series of ridges that moves across the surface of a liquid (especially across a large body of water)
wobble - an unsteady rocking motion
whirl, commotion - confused movement; "he was caught up in a whirl of work"; "a commotion of people fought for the exits"
Brownian motion, Brownian movement, pedesis - the random motion of small particles suspended in a gas or liquid
3.motion - a change of position that does not entail a change of locationmotion - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
change - the action of changing something; "the change of government had no impact on the economy"; "his change on abortion cost him the election"
abduction - (physiology) moving of a body part away from the central axis of the body
adduction - (physiology) moving of a body part toward the central axis of the body
agitation - the act of agitating something; causing it to move around (usually vigorously)
body English - a motion of the body by a player as if to make an object already propelled go in the desired direction
circumduction - a circular movement of a limb or eye
disturbance - the act of disturbing something or someone; setting something in motion
fetal movement, foetal movement - motion of a fetus within the uterus (usually detected by the 16th week of pregnancy)
flit, dart - a sudden quick movement
gesture - motion of hands or body to emphasize or help to express a thought or feeling
headshake, headshaking - the act of turning your head left and right to signify denial or disbelief or bemusement; "I could tell from their headshakes that they didn't believe me"
inclining, inclination - the act of inclining; bending forward; "an inclination of his head indicated his agreement"
everting, eversion, inversion - the act of turning inside out
upending, inversion - turning upside down; setting on end
jerking, jolt, saccade, jerk - an abrupt spasmodic movement
kicking, kick - a rhythmic thrusting movement of the legs as in swimming or calisthenics; "the kick must be synchronized with the arm movements"; "the swimmer's kicking left a wake behind him"
kneel, kneeling - supporting yourself on your knees
pitching, lurch, pitch - abrupt up-and-down motion (as caused by a ship or other conveyance); "the pitching and tossing was quite exciting"
eye movement - the movement of the eyes
opening - the act of opening something; "the ray of light revealed his cautious opening of the door"
prostration - the act of assuming a prostrate position
reaching, stretch, reach - the act of physically reaching or thrusting out
reciprocation - alternating back-and-forth movement
reclining - the act of assuming or maintaining a reclining position
retraction - the act of pulling or holding or drawing a part back; "the retraction of the landing gear"; "retraction of the foreskin"
retroflection, retroflexion - the act of bending backward
rotary motion, rotation - the act of rotating as if on an axis; "the rotation of the dancer kept time with the music"
closing, shutting - the act of closing something
sitting - the act of assuming or maintaining a seated position; "he read the mystery at one sitting"
posing, sitting - (photography) the act of assuming a certain position (as for a photograph or portrait); "he wanted his portrait painted but couldn't spare time for the sitting"
snap - the act of snapping the fingers; movement of a finger from the tip to the base of the thumb on the same hand; "he gave his fingers a snap"
squatting, squat - the act of assuming or maintaining a crouching position with the knees bent and the buttocks near the heels
sweep - a movement in an arc; "a sweep of his arm"
toss - an abrupt movement; "a toss of his head"
vibration, quivering, quiver - the act of vibrating
wave - a movement like that of a sudden occurrence or increase in a specified phenomenon; "a wave of settlers"; "troops advancing in waves"
flutter, waver, flicker - the act of moving back and forth
standing - the act of assuming or maintaining an erect upright position
straddle, span - the act of sitting or standing astride
stroke - a single complete movement
squirm, wiggle, wriggle - the act of wiggling
eurhythmics, eurhythmy, eurythmics, eurythmy - the interpretation in harmonious bodily movements of the rhythm of musical compositions; used to teach musical understanding
4.motion - a state of change; "they were in a state of steady motion"
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
quivering, shakiness, trembling, vibration, shaking, palpitation, quiver - a shaky motion; "the shaking of his fingers as he lit his pipe"
perpetual motion - motion that continues indefinitely without any external source of energy; impossible in practice because of friction
precession - the motion of a spinning body (as a top) in which it wobbles so that the axis of rotation sweeps out a cone
stream, flow - something that resembles a flowing stream in moving continuously; "a stream of people emptied from the terminal"; "the museum had planned carefully for the flow of visitors"
lifelessness, motionlessness, stillness - a state of no motion or movement; "the utter motionlessness of a marble statue"
5.motion - a formal proposal for action made to a deliberative assembly for discussion and vote; "he made a motion to adjourn"; "she called for the question"
proposal - something proposed (such as a plan or assumption)
6.motion - the act of changing location from one place to another; "police controlled the motion of the crowd"; "the movement of people from the farms to the cities"; "his move put him directly in my path"
change - the action of changing something; "the change of government had no impact on the economy"; "his change on abortion cost him the election"
coming, approach, approaching - the act of drawing spatially closer to something; "the hunter's approach scattered the geese"
forward motion, onward motion, advancement, progress, progression, procession, advance - the act of moving forward (as toward a goal)
locomotion, travel - self-propelled movement
lunge, lurch - the act of moving forward suddenly
travel, traveling, travelling - the act of going from one place to another; "he enjoyed selling but he hated the travel"
chase, pursual, pursuit, following - the act of pursuing in an effort to overtake or capture; "the culprit started to run and the cop took off in pursuit"
ascending, rise, ascent, ascension - the act of changing location in an upward direction
descent - the act of changing your location in a downward direction
swinging, vacillation, swing - changing location by moving back and forth
return - the act of going back to a prior location; "they set out on their return to the base camp"
glide, coast, slide - the act of moving smoothly along a surface while remaining in contact with it; "his slide didn't stop until the bottom of the hill"; "the children lined up for a coast down the snowy slope"
slippage - failing to hold or slipping out of place; "the knots allowed no slippage"
flow, stream - the act of flowing or streaming; continuous progression
crawl - a very slow movement; "the traffic advanced at a crawl"
hurrying, speeding, speed - changing location rapidly
displacement, translation - the act of uniform movement
shifting, shift - the act of moving from one place to another; "his constant shifting disrupted the class"
rush, rushing, haste, hurry - the act of moving hurriedly and in a careless manner; "in his haste to leave he forgot his book"
maneuver, manoeuvre, play - a deliberate coordinated movement requiring dexterity and skill; "he made a great maneuver"; "the runner was out on a play by the shortstop"
migration - the movement of persons from one country or locality to another
7.motion - an optical illusion of motion produced by viewing a rapid succession of still pictures of a moving objectmotion - an optical illusion of motion produced by viewing a rapid succession of still pictures of a moving object; "the cinema relies on apparent motion"; "the succession of flashing lights gave an illusion of movement"
optical illusion - an optical phenomenon that results in a false or deceptive visual impression
Verb1.motion - show, express or direct through movement; "He gestured his desire to leave"
wink - signal by winking; "She winked at him"
exsert, hold out, stretch forth, stretch out, put out, extend - thrust or extend out; "He held out his hand"; "point a finger"; "extend a hand"; "the bee exserted its sting"
shrug - raise one's shoulders to indicate indifference or resignation
clap, spat - clap one's hands together; "The children were clapping to the music"
communicate, intercommunicate - transmit thoughts or feelings; "He communicated his anxieties to the psychiatrist"
applaud, acclaim, clap, spat - clap one's hands or shout after performances to indicate approval
bless, sign - make the sign of the cross over someone in order to call on God for protection; consecrate
nod - express or signify by nodding; "He nodded his approval"
cross oneself - make the sign of the cross; in the Catholic religion
bow, bow down - bend one's knee or body, or lower one's head; "He bowed before the King"; "She bowed her head in shame"
shake - shake (a body part) to communicate a greeting, feeling, or cognitive state; "shake one's head"; "She shook her finger at the naughty students"; "The old enemies shook hands"; "Don't shake your fist at me!"
beckon, wave - signal with the hands or nod; "She waved to her friends"; "He waved his hand hospitably"

motion

noun
1. movement, action, mobility, passing, travel, progress, flow, passage, locomotion, motility, kinesics the laws governing light, sound and motion
2. gesture, sign, wave, signal, gesticulation He made a neat chopping motion with his hand.
3. proposal, suggestion, recommendation, proposition, submission The conference is now debating the motion.
verb
1. gesture, direct, wave, signal, nod, beckon, gesticulate She motioned for the doors to be opened.
in motion
2. in progress, going on, under way, afoot, on the go (informal) His job begins in earnest now that the World Cup is in motion.
3. moving, going, working, travelling, functioning, under way, operational, on the move (informal) Always stay seated while a bus is in motion.
set or put something in motion start, begin, launch, institute, initiate, activate, spark off, trigger off Her sharp comments set in motion the events that led to her downfall.
Related words
adjective kinetic
like kinesomania
fear kinesophobia

motion

noun
1. The act or process of moving:
2. An expressive, meaningful bodily movement:
Informal: high sign.
verb
To make bodily motions so as to convey an idea or complement speech:
Idiom: give the high sign.
Translations
إقْتِراححَرَكَة، إشارَهحَرَكَهيُحَرِّك
gestonávrhpohybpokynout
bevægelseforslaggøre tegnvink
indítvány
bendinggefa merkihreyfingtillaga
eigajudantisjudesysmostu duoti ženkląnejudėdamas
kustībamājienspriekšlikumsžests
kývnuť
gibanje
hareketişaretişaret etmek/vermekönerge

motion

[ˈməʊʃən]
A. N
1. (= movement) → movimiento m
to be in motion (lit) → estar en movimiento
plans are already in motion for a new opera houseya hay planes en marcha para la construcción de un nuevo teatro de la ópera
to set in motion [+ mechanism] → poner en marcha
the strike set in motion a chain of events which led to his overthrowla huelga desencadenó una serie de acontecimientos que condujeron a su derrocamiento
to go through the motions (of doing sth); he was just going through the motions of livingestaba viviendo maquinalmente, vivía por inercia
they went through the motions of consulting memberssiguieron la formalidad de consultar a los miembros
to set the wheels in motion (to do sth)poner las cosas en marcha (para hacer algo)
see also perpetual B
see also slow E
see also time C
2. (= gesture) → gesto m, ademán m
he made a chopping motion with his handhizo un gesto como si fuera a cortar algo con la mano, hizo un ademán de cortar algo con la mano
3. (= proposal) → moción f
the motion was carried/defeatedla moción fue aprobada/rechazada
to propose or > make a motion (that ...) (US) → presentar una moción (para que + subjun)
to propose or > make a motion (to do sth) (US) → presentar una moción (para hacer algo)
to vote on a motionvotar una moción
4. (US) (Jur) → petición f
to file a motion (for sth/to do sth)presentar una petición (para algo/para hacer algo)
5. (Brit) (frm) (also bowel motion) (= action) → evacuación f; (= stool) → deposición f
to have or pass a motionevacuar el vientre
6. [of watch, clock] → mecanismo m
B. VT he motioned me to a chair/to sit downcon un gesto indicó que me sentara, hizo señas para que me sentara
to motion sb in(side)/out(side)señalar or indicar a algn con un gesto que entre/salga
C. VI he motioned for the doors to be openedhizo un gesto or hizo señas para que se abrieran las puertas
to motion to sb to do sthindicar a algn con un gesto que haga algo, hacer señas a algn para que haga algo
D. CPD motion picture N (esp US) → película f
motion picture camera N (esp US) → cámara f cinematográfica, cámara f de cine
the motion picture industry Nla industria cinematográfica
motion picture theater (US) Ncine m
motion sickness Nmareo m

motion

[ˈməʊʃən]
n
(= movement) → mouvement m
to be in motion (= moving) [vehicle] → être en marche; [process] → être en route
to set in motion (= start) [+ process, event] → mettre en marche (= start moving) [+ things] → entraîner
to set the wheels in motion (= get things started) → lancer le processus
to go through the motions [person who doesn't really care] → faire semblant
to go through the motions of doing sth (fig)faire qch machinalement or sans conviction
(= gesture) → geste m
(at meeting)motion f
(British) (also bowel motion) → selles fpl
vt
(= point)
He motioned me in another direction → Il m'a fait signe de changer de direction.
He motioned me towards a chair → Il m'a indiqué une chaise du doigt.
(= signal) to motion sb to do sth → faire signe à qn de faire qch
vi (= signal) to motion for sb to do sth → faire signe à qn de faire qch
to motion to sb to do sth → faire signe à qn de faire qch

motion

n
no pl (= movement)Bewegung f; to be in motionsich bewegen; (engine, machine etc) → laufen; (train, bus etc) → fahren; to set or put something in motionetw in Gang bringen or setzen; to set the wheels in motion (to do something)die Dinge ins Rollen bringen(, um etw zu tun)
(= gesture)Bewegung f; to go through the motions of doing something (because protocol, etiquette etc demands it) → etw pro forma or der Form halber tun; (= pretend)so tun, als ob man etw täte, den Anschein erwecken, etw zu tun; (= do mechanically)etw völlig mechanisch tun
(= proposal)Antrag m; to propose or make (US) a motioneinen Antrag stellen
(in debate) → Thema nt
(Brit: = bowel motion) → Stuhlgang m; (= faeces)Stuhl m; to have a motionStuhlgang haben
vt to motion somebody to do somethingjdm bedeuten, etw zu tun (geh), → jdm ein Zeichen geben, dass er etw tun solle; he motioned me to a chairer wies mir einen Stuhl an; he motioned me iner winkte mich herein; she motioned me awaysie gab mir ein Zeichen, wegzugehen
vi to motion to somebody to do somethingjdm bedeuten, etw zu tun (geh), → jdm ein Zeichen geben, dass er etw tun solle

motion

:
motionless
adjunbeweglich, reg(ungs)los; to stand motionbewegungslos dastehen
motion picture
n (esp US) → Film m
motion sensor
motion sickness
n (Med) → Kinetose f (spec), → Seekrankheit f; (in the air) → Luftkrankheit f; (in car) → Autokrankheit f
motion study
n (Econ) → Bewegungsstudie f

motion

[ˈməʊʃn]
1. n
a. (movement) → moto, movimento
perpetual motion → moto perpetuo
to be in motion (vehicle) → essere in moto (machine) → essere in funzione
to set in motion → avviare
to go through the motions of doing sth (fig) → fare qc pro forma
b. (gesture) → cenno, gesto; (proposal, at meeting) → mozione f
c. (Brit) (also bowel motion) → evacuazione f (intestinale)
2. vt & vi to motion (to) sb to do sthfar cenno or segno a qn di fare qc

motion

(ˈməuʃən) noun
1. the act or state of moving. the motion of the planets; He lost the power of motion.
2. a single movement or gesture. He summoned the waiter with a motion of the hand.
3. a proposal put before a meeting. She was asked to speak against the motion in the debate.
verb
to make a movement or sign eg directing a person or telling him to do something. He motioned (to) her to come nearer.
ˈmotionless adjective
not moving. a motionless figure.
motion picture
a cinema film.
in motion
moving. Don't jump on the bus while it is in motion.

mo·tion

n. movimiento; [sign] seña, indicación; moción;
___ sicknessmareo producido por movimiento.

motion

n movimiento; — sickness mareo por movimiento; range of — rango de movimiento
References in classic literature ?
All in favor of this motion please to manifest it by saying, `Aye'.
I'll help you go over your papers, Professor," he added, and with a wink and a motion of his hand, he enjoined silence on his friend.
And there was so much motion in it; the whole country seemed, somehow, to be running.
With a writhing motion she settled herself more securely in the hammock.
Her figure, to be sure,--so small as to be almost childlike, and so elastic that motion seemed as easy or easier to it than rest,would hardly have suited one's idea of a countess.
They probably fancied that my sole object -- and, indeed, the sole object for which a sane man could ever put himself into voluntary motion -- was to get an appetite for dinner.
He rode with short stirrups, which brought his knees nearly up to the pommel of the saddle; his sharp elbows stuck out like grasshoppers'; he carried his whip perpendicularly in his hand, like a sceptre, and as his horse jogged on, the motion of his arms was not unlike the flapping of a pair of wings.
Instead of it even-- as a woman reads another--she could see what I myself saw: his derision, his amusement, his contempt for the breakdown of my resignation at being left alone and for the fine machinery I had set in motion to attract his attention to my slighted charms.
Screwed at its axis against the side, a swinging lamp slightly oscillates in Jonah's room; and the ship, heeling over towards the wharf with the weight of the last bales received, the lamp, flame and all, though in slight motion, still maintains a permanent obliquity with reference to the room; though, in truth, infallibly straight itself, it but made obvious the false, lying levels among which it hung.
Scroll-wise coiled forwards beneath the body, and then rapidly sprung backwards, it is this which gives that singular darting, leaping motion to the monster when furiously swimming.
The motion of a raft is the needful motion; it is gentle, and gliding, and smooth, and noiseless; it calms down all feverish activities, it soothes to sleep all nervous hurry and impatience; under its restful influence all the troubles and vexations and sorrows that harass the mind vanish away, and existence becomes a dream, a charm, a deep and tranquil ecstasy.
She slightly turned her head towards the spot where Rosa Dartle had been standing at her elbow, and in that moment I said, by the motion of my lips, to Rosa, 'Dead