motive


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mo·tive

 (mō′tĭv)
n.
1. An emotion, desire, physiological need, or similar impulse that acts as an incitement to action.
2. (mō′tĭv, mō-tēv′) A motif in art, literature, or music.
adj.
1. Causing or able to cause motion: motive power.
2. Causing an action: motive pleas.

[Middle English motif, motive, from Old French motif, from Late Latin mōtīvus, of motion, from Latin mōtus, past participle of movēre, to move; see meuə- in Indo-European roots.]

motive

(ˈməʊtɪv)
n
1. (Psychology) the reason for a certain course of action, whether conscious or unconscious
2. (Art Terms) a variant of motif2
adj
3. of or causing motion or action: a motive force.
4. of or acting as a motive; motivating
vb (tr)
to motivate
[C14: from Old French motif, from Late Latin mōtīvus (adj) moving, from Latin mōtus, past participle of movēre to move]
ˈmotiveless adj
ˈmotivelessly adv
ˈmotivelessness n

mo•tive

(ˈmoʊ tɪv)

n., adj., v. -tived, -tiv•ing. n.
1. something that causes a person to act in a certain way, do a certain thing, etc.; incentive.
2. the goal or object of a person's actions: Her motive was revenge.
adj.
4. causing or tending to cause motion.
5. pertaining to motion.
6. prompting to action.
7. constituting a motive or motives.
v.t.
[1325–75; (< Middle French motif) < Medieval Latin mōtīvus serving to move = Latin mōt(us) (past participle of movēre to move) + -īvus -ive]
mo′tive•less, adj.
syn: motive, inducement, incentive apply to something that prompts a person to action. motive is usu. applied to an inner urge that moves a person; it may also apply to a contemplated goal, the desire for which moves the person: Her motive was a wish to help. Money was the motive for the crime. inducement is used mainly of opportunities offered by another person or by situational factors: The salary they offered me was a great inducement. incentive is usu. applied to something offered as a reward or to stimulate competitive activity: Profit sharing is an incentive for employees.

motive


Past participle: motived
Gerund: motiving

Imperative
motive
motive
Present
I motive
you motive
he/she/it motives
we motive
you motive
they motive
Preterite
I motived
you motived
he/she/it motived
we motived
you motived
they motived
Present Continuous
I am motiving
you are motiving
he/she/it is motiving
we are motiving
you are motiving
they are motiving
Present Perfect
I have motived
you have motived
he/she/it has motived
we have motived
you have motived
they have motived
Past Continuous
I was motiving
you were motiving
he/she/it was motiving
we were motiving
you were motiving
they were motiving
Past Perfect
I had motived
you had motived
he/she/it had motived
we had motived
you had motived
they had motived
Future
I will motive
you will motive
he/she/it will motive
we will motive
you will motive
they will motive
Future Perfect
I will have motived
you will have motived
he/she/it will have motived
we will have motived
you will have motived
they will have motived
Future Continuous
I will be motiving
you will be motiving
he/she/it will be motiving
we will be motiving
you will be motiving
they will be motiving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been motiving
you have been motiving
he/she/it has been motiving
we have been motiving
you have been motiving
they have been motiving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been motiving
you will have been motiving
he/she/it will have been motiving
we will have been motiving
you will have been motiving
they will have been motiving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been motiving
you had been motiving
he/she/it had been motiving
we had been motiving
you had been motiving
they had been motiving
Conditional
I would motive
you would motive
he/she/it would motive
we would motive
you would motive
they would motive
Past Conditional
I would have motived
you would have motived
he/she/it would have motived
we would have motived
you would have motived
they would have motived
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.motive - the psychological feature that arouses an organism to action toward a desired goalmotive - the psychological feature that arouses an organism to action toward a desired goal; the reason for the action; that which gives purpose and direction to behavior; "we did not understand his motivation"; "he acted with the best of motives"
psychological feature - a feature of the mental life of a living organism
life - a motive for living; "pottery was his life"
rational motive - a motive that can be defended by reasoning or logical argument
irrational motive - a motivation that is inconsistent with reason or logic
impulse, urge - an instinctive motive; "profound religious impulses"
ethical motive, ethics, morals, morality - motivation based on ideas of right and wrong
mental energy, psychic energy - an actuating force or factor
2.motive - a theme that is repeated or elaborated in a piece of music
melodic theme, musical theme, theme, idea - (music) melodic subject of a musical composition; "the theme is announced in the first measures"; "the accompanist picked up the idea and elaborated it"
obbligato, obligato - a persistent but subordinate motif
3.motive - a design or figure that consists of recurring shapes or colors, as in architecture or decorationmotive - a design or figure that consists of recurring shapes or colors, as in architecture or decoration
pattern, design, figure - a decorative or artistic work; "the coach had a design on the doors"
Adj.1.motive - causing or able to cause motion; "a motive force"; "motive power"; "motor energy"
causative - producing an effect; "poverty as a causative factor in crime"
2.motive - impelling to action; "it may well be that ethical language has primarily a motivative function"- Arthur Pap; "motive pleas"; "motivating arguments"
causative - producing an effect; "poverty as a causative factor in crime"

motive

noun
1. reason, motivation, cause, ground(s), design, influence, purpose, object, intention, spur, incentive, inspiration, stimulus, rationale, inducement, incitement, mainspring, the why and wherefore Police have ruled out robbery as a motive for the killing.
adjective
1. moving, driving, motivating, operative, activating, impelling the motive power behind a boxer's punches

motive

noun
1. A basis for an action or a decision:
cause, ground (often used in plural), motivation, reason, spring.
2. An element or a component in a decorative composition:
Translations
حَافِزٌدافِع، حافِز
motivpohnutka
motivbevæggrund
motiivimotivoidavaikutinaiheliike
motiv
indíték
tilefni
動機
동기
akstinasmotyvacijastimulas
iemeslsmotīvs
motív
motivnagib
motiv
เหตุจูงใจ
động cơ

motive

[ˈməʊtɪv]
A. Nmotivo m; (for crime) → móvil m
what can his motive have been?¿qué motivos habrá tenido?
my motives were of the purestlo hice con la mejor intención
B. ADJmotor (fem: motora/motriz)
C. CPD motive power Nfuerza f motriz

motive

[ˈməʊtɪv] n
(for doing sth)motif m
One might question the motives of some politicians → On peut s'interroger sur les motifs de certains hommes politiques.
from the best of motives → avec les meilleures intentions du monde
(for crime)mobile m
the motive for the killing → le mobile du crimemotive power nforce f motrice

motive

n
(= incentive, reason)Motiv nt, → Beweggrund m; (for crime) → (Tat)motiv nt; the profit motiveGewinnstreben nt; with the purest of motivesmit den besten Absichten
adj motive power/forceAntriebs- or Triebkraft f

motive

[ˈməʊtɪv]
1. n (gen) → motivo, ragione f; (for crime) → movente m
from the best motives → con le migliori intenzioni
2. adjmotore/trice

motive

(ˈməutiv) noun
something that makes a person choose to act in a particular way; a reason. What was his motive for murdering the old lady?
ˈmotivate (-veit) verb
to cause to act in a particular way. He was motivated by jealousy.
motiˈvation noun

motive

حَافِزٌ motiv motiv Motiv κίνητρο motivo motiivi mobile motiv motivo 動機 동기 motief motiv motyw motivo мотив motiv เหตุจูงใจ sebep động cơ 动机

mo·tive

n. motivo; ánimo, fuerza mayor.
References in classic literature ?
You need a motive, Mother says, and when you get it, she is sure you'll work splendidly.
Every lawyer learns over and over how strong a motive hate can be, but in my collection of legal anecdotes I had nothing to match this one.
I don't understand your motive for silence and mystery, never saying a word to me about it this morning.
He then signed to Heyward to assist the sisters into the saddles, for he seldom deigned to use the English tongue, unless urged by some motive of more than usual moment.
Hepzibah bade her young guest sit down, and, herself taking a chair near by, looked as earnestly at Phoebe's trim little figure as if she expected to see right into its springs and motive secrets.
What she compelled herself to believe -- what, finally, she reasoned upon as her motive for continuing a resident of New England -- was half a truth, and half a self-delusion.
what if, by risking to his boyish bewilderment a revelation of my motive, I should throw across the rest of the mystery the long halter of my boldness?
There it was, too, that most of the deadly encounters with the white whale had taken place; there the waves were storied with his deeds; there also was that tragic spot where the monomaniac old man had found the awful motive to his vengeance.
Some people said that they did this for the sake of the advertising it gave them, and some others said that their motive was a fear lest all their readers should be starved off; but whatever the reason, the soup was thick and hot, and there was a bowl for every man, all night long.
Shelby's dread of his succeeding in recapturing Eliza and her child, and of course the greater her motive for detaining him by every female artifice.
But about that time I noticed that the motive power had taken to standing on one leg, and I found that there was something the matter with the other one; so I stocked the business and unloaded, taking Sir Bors de Ganis into camp financially along with certain of his friends; for the works stopped within a year, and the good saint got him to his rest.
I saw that dandy's curious game played afterward, in Paris, but not for amusement; not with a motive of any sort, indeed, but simply from a selfish indifference to other people's comfort and rights.