motte-and-bailey


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motte-and-bailey

A mound or motte surmounted by a wooden (later stone) tower (bailey) and enclosed by a ditch and palisade. The earliest example of this primitive castle form is on the River Loire (France) and is dated 1010.
References in periodicals archive ?
It dates back to 1202 as a listed motte-and-bailey castle site built to guard the crossing of the river Dee.
Clitheroe Castle, Clitheroe |CLITHEROE Castle in Clitheroe is a motte-and-bailey castle which was first built sometime in the 11th or 12th century.
In 1068 William the Conqueror built a motte-and-bailey fort on the site.
Castell Cynfael is a motte-and-bailey castle built in 1137 by Owain Gwynedd's brother Cadwaladr.
Home of the Barons of Mitford for centuries, the motte-and-bailey castle ( in ruins since the 14th Century ( is grade I listed and on English Heritage's Buildings at Risk Register.
Furnival was, however, not the castle's founder -- for it was originally built around 1100 as an earthwork motte-and-bailey fortress by a Norman knight called William de Lovetot.
Finally, Barbara English's essay, "Towns, Mottes and Ring-works of the Conquest," which attempts to show that all of William the Conqueror's pre-Hastings castles were ring-works and not motte-and-bailey castles, is based on no archaeological or historical sources other than her conjectures.