mound builder


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Mound Builder

n.
1. Any of various distinct Native American cultures flourishing from around the 5th century bc to the 16th century ad especially in the Ohio and Mississippi Valleys, practicing settled agriculture and known for their often large burial, temple, or effigy mounds.
2. A member of a people associated with any of these cultures.

mound builder

n.

Mound Builder

n
1. (Archaeology) a member of a group of prehistoric inhabitants of the Mississippi region who built altar-mounds, tumuli, etc
2. (Peoples) a member of a group of prehistoric inhabitants of the Mississippi region who built altar-mounds, tumuli, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mound Builder - prehistoric Amerindians who built altar moundsMound Builder - prehistoric Amerindians who built altar mounds
primitive, primitive person - a person who belongs to an early stage of civilization
2.Mound Builder - large-footed short-winged birds of Australasiamound builder - large-footed short-winged birds of Australasia; build mounds of decaying vegetation to incubate eggs
gallinacean, gallinaceous bird - heavy-bodied largely ground-feeding domestic or game birds
leipoa, Leipoa ocellata, lowan, mallee fowl - Australian mound bird; incubates eggs naturally in sandy mounds
Alectura lathami, brush turkey - black megapode of wooded regions of Australia and New Guinea
Macrocephalon maleo, maleo - Celebes megapode that lays eggs in holes in sandy beaches
References in periodicals archive ?
Mound builders and monument makers of the northern Great Lakes, 1200-1600.
One chapter is dedicated to North American mound builders and a final provocative contribution by Tim Ingold argues that round mounds are not monuments, not designed, not time capsules but by definition an accretion of material, a growth (p.
filled with detailed drawings and illustrations partially supplemented or completed by Aubrey Wells after the death of the original author/illustrator, "The Story of the American Indian" presents background information on Mayans, Pueblos and cliff-dwellers, Mound Builders, Iroquois, Lakota and other Plains Indian nations, Cherokee, Paiute and other Seed-Gatherers, Northwest Fishermen nations including Haida, Eskimos, Navajo, and other Indian American nations and tribes.
3-4 Descendants of the Mound Builders Native Gathering.
From Cahokia in southern Illinois to Poverty Point in northeastern Louisiana, the mound builders, as they came to be called, created the first major urban centers in North America.