mouthful


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mouth·ful

 (mouth′fo͝ol′)
n.
1. The amount of food or other material that can be placed or held in the mouth at one time.
2. A small amount to be tasted or eaten.
3. A long word, name, or phrase that is difficult to pronounce.
4. An important or perceptive remark: You said a mouthful!

mouthful

(ˈmaʊθˌfʊl)
n, pl -fuls
1. as much as is held in the mouth at one time
2. (Cookery) a small quantity, as of food
3. (Linguistics) a long word or phrase that is difficult to say
4. informal Brit an abusive response
5. informal chiefly US and Canadian an impressive remark (esp in the phrase say a mouthful)

mouth•ful

(ˈmaʊθˌfʊl)

n., pl. -fuls.
1. the amount a mouth can hold.
2. the amount taken into the mouth at one time.
3. a spoken remark of great truth, relevance, etc.
4. a long word or phrase, esp. one that is hard to pronounce.
[1375–1425]
usage: See -ful.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mouthful - the quantity that can be held in the mouthmouthful - the quantity that can be held in the mouth
containerful - the quantity that a container will hold
2.mouthful - a small amount eaten or drunk; "take a taste--you'll like it"
helping, serving, portion - an individual quantity of food or drink taken as part of a meal; "the helpings were all small"; "his portion was larger than hers"; "there's enough for two servings each"
bite, morsel, bit - a small amount of solid food; a mouthful; "all they had left was a bit of bread"
sup, swallow - a small amount of liquid food; "a sup of ale"
small indefinite amount, small indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is below average size or magnitude

mouthful

noun taste, little, bite, bit, drop, sample, swallow, sip, sup, spoonful, morsel, forkful Could I try a mouthful of that?

mouthful

noun
A small portion of food:
Informal: bite.
Translations
مِلْء الفَم
loksousto
mundfuld
egy falás
munnfylli
plné ústa
ağız dolusu

mouthful

[ˈmaʊθfʊl] N [of food] → bocado m; [of drink] → trago m; [of smoke, air] → bocanada f
the name is a bit of a mouthfules un nombre kilométrico
you said a mouthful (US) → ¡y que lo digas!, ¡tú lo has dicho!

mouthful

[ˈmaʊθfʊl] n
[food, drink] → bouchée f
to be a mouthful [name, word] → difficile à prononcermouth organ nharmonica m
I play the mouth organ → Je joue de l'harmonica.

mouthful

n (of drink)Schluck m; (of food)Bissen m, → Happen m (inf); (fig) (= difficult word)Zungenbrecher m; (= long word)Bandwurm m; the diver gulped in great mouthfuls of airder Taucher machte ein paar tiefe Atemzüge; I got a mouthful of salt waterich habe einen ganzen Schwall Salzwasser geschluckt; you said a mouthful (US inf) → das kann man wohl sagen

mouthful

[ˈmaʊθfʊl] n (of food) → boccone m; (of drink) → sorsata

mouth

(mauθ) plural mouths (mauðz) noun
1. the opening in the head by which a human or animal eats and speaks or makes noises. What has the baby got in its mouth?
2. the opening or entrance eg of a bottle, river etc. the mouth of the harbour.
verb (mauð)
to move the lips as if forming (words), but without making any sound. He mouthed the words to me so that no-one could overhear.
ˈmouthful noun
as much as fills the mouth. a mouthful of soup; He ate the cake in two mouthfuls.
ˈmouth-organ noun
a small musical instrument played by blowing or sucking air through its metal pipes.
ˈmouthpiece noun
1. the piece of a musical instrument etc which is held in the mouth. the mouthpiece of a horn.
2. the part of a telephone etc into which one speaks.
ˈmouthwash noun
an antiseptic liquid used for cleaning out the mouth.

mouthful

n (pl -fuls) bocado
References in classic literature ?
The soup fell out of the long bill of the Crane at every mouthful, and his vexation at not being able to eat afforded the Fox much amusement.
He took the piglets from his pocket and let them run on the grass, and Jim tasted a mouthful of the green blades and declared he was very contented in his new surroundings.
Just imagine the grave old gentleman clattering and stamping into the schoolroom on his four hoofs, perhaps treading on some little fellow's toes, flourishing his switch tail instead of a rod, and, now and then, trotting out of doors to eat a mouthful of grass
arva', and throwing it mouthful after mouthful into the receptacle provided.
The cub found no more milk in his mother's breast, nor did he get one mouthful of meat for himself.
And it is not the mouthful which hath most choked me, to know that life itself requireth enmity and death and torture-crosses:--
At one time they were three entire days with-out a mouthful of food; at length they beheld a buffalo grazing at the foot of the mountain.
Doubtless they feel that they cannot trust themselves in the close vicinity of so much perfectly good food without the danger that they may help themselves to a mouthful some time by mistake.
Button-Bright looked curiously at the man who had "no appetite inside him," for the Tin Woodman, although he had prepared so fine a feast for his guests, ate not a mouthful himself, sitting patiently in his place to see that all built so they could eat were well and plentifully served.
You must just eat a mouthful, now, and drink only one tiny glass.
A dish of their meat was a good mouthful, and a barrel of their liquor a reasonable draught.
It was evident he had suffered, like themselves, the pangs of hunger, though he had fared better at this encampment; for they had not a mouthful to eat.