moved


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Related to moved: moved to tears

move

 (mo͞ov)
v. moved, mov·ing, moves
v.intr.
1.
a. To change in position from one point to another: moved away from the window.
b. To follow a specified course: Earth moves around the sun.
c. To change posture or position; stir: too scared to move.
d. To start off; depart: After waiting for an hour, we decided it was time to move.
e. Games To change position on a board in a board game.
f. To go from one residence or location to another; relocate: We moved to a new apartment.
g. Linguistics To be copied or moved by means of a movement transformation to a new position in syntactic structure.
2.
a. To progress in sequence; go forward: a novel that moves slowly.
b. To progress toward a particular state or condition: moving up in the company; move on to a new subject.
3. To be disposed of by sale: Woolens move slowly in the summer.
4. To be put in motion or to turn according to a prescribed motion. Used of machinery.
5.
a. To exhibit great activity or energy: Things were really moving backstage.
b. To initiate an action; act: It's time to make a decision and move.
c. To be active in a particular environment: moves in diplomatic circles.
6. To stir the emotions: words that have the power to move.
7. To make a formal motion in parliamentary procedure: move for an adjournment.
8. To evacuate. Used of the bowels.
v.tr.
1.
a. To change the place or position of: moved the chair into the corner; could not move his arm.
b. To cause to go from one place to another: moved the crowd away.
c. Games To change (a piece) from one position to another in a board game: moved a pawn.
2.
a. To change the course of: moved the discussion to other matters.
b. To cause to progress or advance: moved the research into new thinking.
3.
a. To dislodge from a fixed point of view, as by persuasion: "Speak to him, ladies, see if you can move him" (Shakespeare).
b. To prompt to action; rouse: Anger moved her to speak out.
c. To arouse the emotions of; affect or stir.
4.
a. To cause to function: This lever moves the elevator.
b. To cause to progress or advance: moved the project beyond conventional thinking.
5.
a. To propose or request in formal parliamentary procedure: moved that a vote be taken.
b. To make formal application to (a court, for example).
6. To dispose of by sale: moved the new merchandise quickly.
7. To cause (the bowels) to evacuate.
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of moving.
b. A particular manner of moving: made some intricate moves on the dance floor.
2. A change of residence or location.
3. Games
a. An act of transferring a piece from one position to another in board games.
b. The prescribed manner in which a piece may be played.
c. A participant's turn to make a play.
4. An action taken to achieve an objective; a maneuver: a move to halt the arms race.
Phrasal Verbs:
move in
To begin to occupy a residence or place of business.
move on
To shift one's attention or emotions to other matters, often as part of recovering from a setback or difficulty: After he was laid off, he moved on and started looking for another job.
Idioms:
get a move on Informal
To get started; get going.
move in on
1. To make intrusive advances toward; intrude on.
2. To attempt to seize control of: moving in on their territory.
on the move
1. Busily moving about; active: A nurse is on the move all day.
2. Going from one place to another: troops on the move.
3. Making progress; advancing: a technology that is clearly on the move.

[Middle English moven, from Old French movoir, from Latin movēre; see meuə- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: move, affect1, touch
These verbs mean to stir the emotions of a person or group. Move suggests a strong or deep emotional impact that is often expressed openly: a performer who moved the audience to laughter and tears; scenes of famine that moved us to pity. Affect can suggest a quieter but more persistent emotional state, as of grief, awe, or sorrow: "Roosevelt was deeply affected by his loss. One by one, the President's closest companions had fallen away" (Geoffrey C. Ward).
Touch implies a personal and often inspirational experience, as of sympathy, admiration, or tenderness: "Mr. Micawber pressed my hand, and groaned, and afterwards shed tears. I was greatly touched" (Charles Dickens).

moved

(muːvd)
adj
touched; emotionally affected
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.moved - being excited or provoked to the expression of an emotion; "too moved to speak"; "very touched by the stranger's kindness"
affected - acted upon; influenced
emotional - of more than usual emotion; "his behavior was highly emotional"
unmoved, unaffected, untouched - emotionally unmoved; "always appeared completely unmoved and imperturbable"
Translations

moved

[ˈmuːvd] adj (= touched) → ému(e)
References in classic literature ?
Queer little red bugs came out and moved in slow squadrons around me.
She felt moved to read the book in secret and solitude, though none of the others had done so,--to hide it from view at the sound of approaching footsteps.
Here their progress was less interrupted; and the instant the guide perceived that the females could command their steeds, he moved on, at a pace between a trot and a walk, and at a rate which kept the sure- footed and peculiar animals they rode at a fast yet easy amble.
The cavalcade had not long passed, before the branches of the bushes that formed the thicket were cautiously moved asunder, and a human visage, as fiercely wild as savage art and unbridled passions could make it, peered out on the retiring footsteps of the travelers.
We've moved four times in the past year and All My Sons Moving has been the best one so far," shared Hank Baskett.
Ameriprise Financial: 39th floor (40,000 s/f); Moved in June 2006 Darby & Darby P.
The metal initially was placed into a vertically oriented ladle, which then moved horizontally to above the pouring basin and stopped.
Teenagers who have recently moved are more likely than others to begin having premarital sex, but moving itself--which has adverse consequences on a range of adolescent behaviors--does not explain the adoption of this behavior.
The Answer: The saying of the second person is false because if the fire moved toward the center, it would either arrive at the center or it would never arrive.
No matter whether you want them moved or copied, tell Excel, in the box labeled To book, where to place the sheets.
Suzanne Miles, who moved to Detroit last year to work as a judicial law clerk for the U.
An official from Antonovich's office insisted that if the tree is not moved it would be subject to undue stress with a street on either side of it.