moves


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move

 (mo͞ov)
v. moved, mov·ing, moves
v.intr.
1.
a. To change in position from one point to another: moved away from the window.
b. To follow a specified course: Earth moves around the sun.
c. To change posture or position; stir: too scared to move.
d. To start off; depart: After waiting for an hour, we decided it was time to move.
e. Games To change position on a board in a board game.
f. To go from one residence or location to another; relocate: We moved to a new apartment.
g. Linguistics To be copied or moved by means of a movement transformation to a new position in syntactic structure.
2.
a. To progress in sequence; go forward: a novel that moves slowly.
b. To progress toward a particular state or condition: moving up in the company; move on to a new subject.
3. To be disposed of by sale: Woolens move slowly in the summer.
4. To be put in motion or to turn according to a prescribed motion. Used of machinery.
5.
a. To exhibit great activity or energy: Things were really moving backstage.
b. To initiate an action; act: It's time to make a decision and move.
c. To be active in a particular environment: moves in diplomatic circles.
6. To stir the emotions: words that have the power to move.
7. To make a formal motion in parliamentary procedure: move for an adjournment.
8. To evacuate. Used of the bowels.
v.tr.
1.
a. To change the place or position of: moved the chair into the corner; could not move his arm.
b. To cause to go from one place to another: moved the crowd away.
c. Games To change (a piece) from one position to another in a board game: moved a pawn.
2.
a. To change the course of: moved the discussion to other matters.
b. To cause to progress or advance: moved the research into new thinking.
3.
a. To dislodge from a fixed point of view, as by persuasion: "Speak to him, ladies, see if you can move him" (Shakespeare).
b. To prompt to action; rouse: Anger moved her to speak out.
c. To arouse the emotions of; affect or stir.
4.
a. To cause to function: This lever moves the elevator.
b. To cause to progress or advance: moved the project beyond conventional thinking.
5.
a. To propose or request in formal parliamentary procedure: moved that a vote be taken.
b. To make formal application to (a court, for example).
6. To dispose of by sale: moved the new merchandise quickly.
7. To cause (the bowels) to evacuate.
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of moving.
b. A particular manner of moving: made some intricate moves on the dance floor.
2. A change of residence or location.
3. Games
a. An act of transferring a piece from one position to another in board games.
b. The prescribed manner in which a piece may be played.
c. A participant's turn to make a play.
4. An action taken to achieve an objective; a maneuver: a move to halt the arms race.
Phrasal Verbs:
move in
To begin to occupy a residence or place of business.
move on
To shift one's attention or emotions to other matters, often as part of recovering from a setback or difficulty: After he was laid off, he moved on and started looking for another job.
Idioms:
get a move on Informal
To get started; get going.
move in on
1. To make intrusive advances toward; intrude on.
2. To attempt to seize control of: moving in on their territory.
on the move
1. Busily moving about; active: A nurse is on the move all day.
2. Going from one place to another: troops on the move.
3. Making progress; advancing: a technology that is clearly on the move.

[Middle English moven, from Old French movoir, from Latin movēre; see meuə- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: move, affect1, touch
These verbs mean to stir the emotions of a person or group. Move suggests a strong or deep emotional impact that is often expressed openly: a performer who moved the audience to laughter and tears; scenes of famine that moved us to pity. Affect can suggest a quieter but more persistent emotional state, as of grief, awe, or sorrow: "Roosevelt was deeply affected by his loss. One by one, the President's closest companions had fallen away" (Geoffrey C. Ward).
Touch implies a personal and often inspirational experience, as of sympathy, admiration, or tenderness: "Mr. Micawber pressed my hand, and groaned, and afterwards shed tears. I was greatly touched" (Charles Dickens).

moves

  • ascend - A planet ascends when it moves toward the zenith or comes above the horizon.
  • substrate - The surface on which an organism lives or moves.
  • acquitment - The series of moves that a magician makes to convince the audience that his/her hands are empty.
  • haws - If an animal haws, it turns or moves to the left.
References in classic literature ?
Finding the new guest there,--with a bloom on her cheeks like the morning's own, and a gentle stir of departing slumber in her limbs, as when an early breeze moves the foliage, --the dawn kissed her brow.
But Ahab, my Captain, still moves before me in all his Nantucket grimness and shagginess; and in this episode touching Emperors and Kings, I must not conceal that I have only to do with a poor old whale-hunter like him; and, therefore, all outward majestical trappings and housings are denied me.
This delicacy is chiefly evinced in the action of sweeping, when in maidenly gentleness the whale with a certain soft slowness moves his immense flukes from side to side upon the surface of the sea; and if he feel but a sailor's whisker, woe to that sailor, whiskers and all.
The people who worked here followed the ancient custom of nature, whereby the ptarmigan is the color of dead leaves in the fall and of snow in the winter, and the chameleon, who is black when he lies upon a stump and turns green when he moves to a leaf.
Piled with cotton-bales, from many a plantation, up over deck and sides, till she seems in the distance a square, massive block of gray, she moves heavily onward to the nearing mart.
If any man moves -- even the king -- before I give him leave, I will blast him with thunder, I will consume him with lightnings
He accepts, and the pleasant talk and the beer flow for an hour or two, and by and by the professor, properly charged and comfortable, gives a cordial good night, while the students stand bowing and uncovered; and then he moves on his happy way homeward with all his vast cargo of learning afloat in his hold.
You are very stiff,' said Heathcliff, 'I know that: but you'll force me to pinch the baby and make it scream before it moves your charity.
The smoke immediately moves from the dish to the plate.
Also, I see that they are covered with dust, and that the dust moves with them as they come, tramp, tramp
In her stead, the perfect likeness of the picture, a child likeness no more, moves about the house; and Agnes - my sweet sister, as I call her in my thoughts, my counsellor and friend, the better angel of the lives of all who come within her calm, good, self-denying influence - is quite a woman.
I prayed to my Ehlose, to the spirit that watches me--ay, and I even dared to pray to the Umkulunkulu, the great soul of the world, who moves through the heavens and the earth unseen and unheard.