movie


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mov·ie

 (mo͞o′vē)
n.
1.
a. A recorded sequence of film or video images displayed on a screen with sufficient rapidity as to create the illusion of motion and continuity.
b. Any work, as of art or entertainment, having this form, usually including a soundtrack: a movie about the cost of war.
c. The presentation of such a work: During the movie, the person in front of me kept talking.
d. A long narrative work of this form: a television channel that shows foreign movies.
2. movies Screenings of movies at a public theater: Would you like to go to the movies tonight?
3. movies The movie industry.

[Shortening and alteration of moving picture.]

movie

(ˈmuːvɪ)
n
(Film)
a. an informal word for film1
b. (as modifier): movie ticket.
[C20: from mov(ing picture) + -ie]

mov•ie

(ˈmu vi)

n.
2. a motion-picture theater (often prec. by the).
3. movies,
a. the business of making motion pictures; motion-picture industry.
b. the showing of a motion picture.
[1905–10; mov (ing picture) + -ie]

movie

  • art movie - A movie intended to be an artistic work rather than a commercial movie of mass appeal.
  • longueurs - Boring periods of time or parts of a book, play, music, or movie are longueurs.
  • horse opera - A slang term for a western (movie).
  • vamp - Theda Bara's performance in the movie The Vampire brought us this word, meaning "seductive woman."
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.movie - a form of entertainment that enacts a story by sound and a sequence of images giving the illusion of continuous movementmovie - a form of entertainment that enacts a story by sound and a sequence of images giving the illusion of continuous movement; "they went to a movie every Saturday night"; "the film was shot on location"
product, production - an artifact that has been created by someone or some process; "they improve their product every year"; "they export most of their agricultural production"
sequence, episode - film consisting of a succession of related shots that develop a given subject in a movie
credit - an entry on a list of persons who contributed to a film or written work; "the credits were given at the end of the film"
subtitle, caption - translation of foreign dialogue of a movie or TV program; usually displayed at the bottom of the screen
credits - a list of acknowledgements of those who contributed to the creation of a film (usually run at the end of the film)
telefilm - a movie that is made to be shown on television
scene, shot - a consecutive series of pictures that constitutes a unit of action in a film
feature film, feature - the principal (full-length) film in a program at a movie theater; "the feature tonight is `Casablanca'"
final cut - the final edited version of a movie as approved by the director and producer
home movie - a film made at home by an amateur photographer
collage film - a movie that juxtaposes different kinds of footage
coming attraction - a movie that is advertised to draw customers
shoot-'em-up - a movie featuring shooting and violence
short subject - a brief film; often shown prior to showing the feature
docudrama, documentary, documentary film, infotainment - a film or TV program presenting the facts about a person or event
cinema verite - a movie that shows ordinary people in actual activities without being controlled by a director
film noir - a movie that is marked by a mood of pessimism, fatalism, menace, and cynical characters; "film noir was applied by French critics to describe American thriller or detective films in the 1940s"
skin flick - a pornographic movie
rough cut - the first print of a movie after preliminary editing
silent movie, silent picture, silents - a movie without a soundtrack
slow motion - a movie that apparently takes place at a slower than normal speed; achieved by taking the film at a faster rate
talkie, talking picture - a movie with synchronized speech and singing
3D, 3-D, three-D - a movie with images having three dimensional form or appearance
show - a social event involving a public performance or entertainment; "they wanted to see some of the shows on Broadway"
musical, musical comedy, musical theater - a play or film whose action and dialogue is interspersed with singing and dancing
dub - provide (movies) with a soundtrack of a foreign language
synchronise, synchronize - make (motion picture sound) exactly simultaneous with the action; "synchronize this film"
film, shoot, take - make a film or photograph of something; "take a scene"; "shoot a movie"
videotape, tape - record on videotape
reshoot - shoot again; "We had to reshoot that scene 24 times"

movie

noun film, picture, feature, flick (slang), motion picture, moving picture (U.S.) That was the first movie he ever made.
the movies the cinema, a film, the pictures (informal), the flicks (slang), the silver screen (informal) He took her to the movies.
Translations
السّينمافِلْم سينمائيفِيلْمفِيلْمٌ
filmkino
film=-filmbiograf
FilmKinoRoadmovie
filmo
elokuva
film
filmmozi
kvikmyndmyndbíó, kvikmyndirbíómynd
映画
영화
film
kino
biofilm
ภาพยนตร์
phim

movie

[ˈmuːvɪ] (esp US)
A. Npelícula f, film(e) m
the moviesel cine
to go to the moviesir al cine
B. CPD movie camera Ncámara f cinematográfica
movie house N = movie theatre the movie industry Nla industria cinematográfica
movie star Nestrella f de cine
movie theatre Ncine m

movie

[ˈmuːvi] nfilm m
the movies → le cinéma
Let's go to the movies! → Si on allait au cinéma?movie camera ncaméra f

movie

n (esp US) → Film m; (the) moviesder Film; to go to the moviesins Kino gehen

movie

(esp US) in cpdsFilm-;
movie camera
nFilmkamera f
moviegoer
nKinogänger(in) m(f)
movie house
nKino nt, → Filmtheater nt
movie star
nFilmstar m
movie theater
nKino nt

movie

[ˈmuːvɪ] (esp Am)
1. nfilm m inv
to go to the movies → andare al cinema
2. adj (star) → del cinema; (industry) → cinematografico/a

move

(muːv) verb
1. to (cause to) change position or go from one place to another. He moved his arm; Don't move!; Please move your car.
2. to change houses. We're moving on Saturday.
3. to affect the feelings or emotions of. I was deeply moved by the film.
noun
1. (in board games) an act of moving a piece. You can win this game in three moves.
2. an act of changing homes. How did your move go?
ˈmovable, ˈmoveable adjective
ˈmovement noun
1. (an act of) changing position or going from one point to another. The animal turned sideways with a swift movement.
2. activity. In this play there is a lot of discussion but not much movement.
3. the art of moving gracefully or expressively. She teaches movement and drama.
4. an organization or association. the Scout movement.
5. the moving parts of a watch, clock etc.
6. a section of a large-scale piece of music. the third movement of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony.
7. a general tendency towards a habit, point of view etc. There's a movement towards simple designs in clothing these days.
movie (-vi) noun
(especially American).
1. a cinema film. a horror movie.
2. (in plural. with the) the cinema and films in general: to go to the movies.
ˈmoving adjective
having an effect on the emotions etc. a very moving speech.
ˈmovingly adverb
get a move on
to hurry or move quickly. Get a move on, or you'll be late!
make a move
1. to move at all. If you make a move, I'll shoot you!
2. (with for or towards) to move (in the direction of). He made a move for the door.
move along
to keep moving, not staying in one place. The police told the crowd to move along.
move heaven and earth
to do everything that one possibly can.
move house
to change one's home or place of residence. They're moving house next week.
move in
to go into and occupy a house etc. We can move in on Saturday.
move off
(of vehicles etc) to begin moving away. The bus moved off just as I got to the bus stop.
move out
to leave, cease to live in, a house etc. She has to move out before the new owners arrive.
move up
to move in any given direction so as to make more space. Move up and let me sit down, please.
on the move
1. moving from place to place. With his kind of job, he's always on the move.
2. advancing. The frontiers of scientific knowledge are always on the move.

movie

فِيلْم, فِيلْمٌ film film Film ταινία película elokuva film film film 映画 영화 film film film filme фильм film ภาพยนตร์ film phim 电影
References in classic literature ?
I read a book, and then I took a walk, and then I dropped in at the restaurant for a bite, and then I walked around some more, and then I went to a movie.
Say, Saxon, d'ye know I don't care if I never see movie pictures again.
Damon, as they came out of the theater two hours later, all three chuckling at the remembrance of what they had seen, "I wonder you never turned your inventive mind to the movies.
They are to them what the racetrack and the prize ring, the theater and the movies are to us.
At the sight of the body within the cage with the lion, the women and children of the village set up a most frightful lamentation, working themselves into a joyous hysteria which far transcended the happy misery derived by their more civilized prototypes who make a business of dividing their time between the movies and the neighborhood funerals of friends and strangers--especially strangers.
He's been going to the movies too much, and thinks every man who has had his trousers pressed is a social gangster.
Too often, the house you've seen in a movie is something that was on the backlot for a few weeks and was knocked down.
In The Sweet Hereafter, a movie that deals with the effects of a school bus crash on a small community, the bus may crash on screen, but it does so slowly and in terrifying long shot, a decision that has the deeply disturbing effect of allowing us to imagine the long-term consequences of this tragedy at the same moment we're watching it.
There were drafts where it was more emphasized, but it's a hard selling point when you're saying, in a mainstream PG-13 movie for kids, "Hey, come see .
When sex scandals had rocked Hollywood in the early 1920s, the movie studios had formed the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America to stop the bad publicity and supposedly make sure the films themselves were clean.
Ross argues that they saw themselves that way in the movies.