mozo


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mo·zo

 (mō′zō)
n. pl. mo·zos Southwestern US
1. A man who helps with a pack train or serves as a porter.
2. An assistant.

[Spanish, boy, servant, mozo, from Old Spanish moço, of unknown origin.]

mozo

(ˈmɒʊzəʊ)
n, pl -zos
1. (in Latin America)a male porter or servant
2. an attendant to a matador or bullfighter
References in periodicals archive ?
The Company's portfolio of brands includes UGG, I HEART UGG, Teva, Sanuk, TSUBO, Ahnu, MOZO, and HOKA ONE ONE.
Reem Al Marzouqi, the 25-year-old Emirati engineer who designed Mozo is thrilled with the successful breakthrough the toy has had with children with autism.
He said that it will be available with exclusive accessories such as Coloud Boom headset and a sleek Mozo flip cover and screen protector, and a one-year subscription of Office 365 Personal, which includes the latest Office applications (and 1TB of OneDrive storage), both worth Dh295.
XL will be available with accessories such as Coloud BOOM headset and a Mozo
Beatriz Recari followed with a 3-and-2 victory over Mikaela Parmlid of Sweden, and Belen Mozo clinched the tournament title with a 3-and-2 win over Moriya Jutanugarn of Thailand.
VIVA ESPAEaeA: From left to right, Belen Mozo, Beatriz Recari, Carlota Ciganda and Azahara Munoz, all of Spain, hold the trophy after winning the International Crown golf tournament Sunday in Owings Mills, Md.
Kirsty Lamont, director of Mozo, an interest rate comparison Web site, said more lenders would likely also chop their rates.
Enhanced with informed and informative essays by Tom Henry, Paul Joannides, Ana Gonzalez Mozo, and Bruno Martin, "Late Raphael" is a very highly recommended addition to personal, community, and academic library Renaissance Art History reference collections and supplemental reading lists.
Ana Gonzalez Mozo, a technical specialist at the Prado, presented the findings at a conference on Leonardo da Vinci at London's National Gallery last month.
Zekka, portav, mozo, qwelp, 4 I don't need a bit of help.
Her topics include ekphrasis in Valle-Inclan's Comedias barbaras; the stage enframed in Rafael Alberti's Noche de guerra en el Museo del Prado; the painting absent from Buero Vallego's Las Meninas; Goya's monstrous imagination in Vallejo's Sueno de la razon; Guernica on stage by Arrabal, Lopez Mozo, and Torres Monreal; and painting, performance, and theatricality in Paloma Pedrero's El color de agosto.