mucus


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Related to mucus: cervical mucus

mu·cus

 (myo͞o′kəs)
n.
The viscous, slippery substance that consists chiefly of mucin, water, cells, and inorganic salts and is secreted as a protective lubricant coating by cells and glands of the mucous membranes.

[Latin mūcus.]

mucus

(ˈmjuːkəs)
n
1. (Physiology) the slimy protective secretion of the mucous membranes, consisting mainly of mucin
2. (Biochemistry) the slimy protective secretion of the mucous membranes, consisting mainly of mucin
[C17: from Latin: nasal secretions; compare mungere to blow the nose; related to Greek muxa mucus, muktēr nose]
Usage: See at mucous

mu•cus

(ˈmyu kəs)

n.
a viscous solution of mucins, water, electrolytes, and white blood cells that is secreted by mucous membranes and serves to protect and lubricate the internal surfaces of the body.
[1655–65; < Latin mūcus snot; akin to Greek myktḗr nose, mýxa slime]

mu·cus

(myo͞o′kəs)
The slimy substance secreted by mucous membranes to lubricate and protect them.
mucous, mucus - Mucous is the adjective from Latin meaning "slimy," and mucus is the noun from Latin but cognate with Greek mussesthai, "blow the nose."
See also related terms for slime.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mucus - protective secretion of the mucus membranesmucus - protective secretion of the mucus membranes; in the gut it lubricates the passage of food and protects the epithelial cells; in the nose and throat and lungs it can make it difficult for bacteria to penetrate the body through the epithelium
secretion - a functionally specialized substance (especially one that is not a waste) released from a gland or cell
sputum, phlegm - expectorated matter; saliva mixed with discharges from the respiratory passages; in ancient and medieval physiology it was believed to cause sluggishness
snot - nasal mucus
booger - dried nasal mucus
leucorrhea, leukorrhea - discharge of white mucous material from the vagina; often an indication of infection
mucin - a nitrogenous substance found in mucous secretions; a lubricant that protects body surfaces
Translations
مُخاط
hlensliz
slim
lima
sluz
nyálka
slím
gleivės
gļotas

mucus

[ˈmjuːkəs] Nmoco m

mucus

[ˈmjuːkəs] nmucus m

mucus

nSchleim m

mucus

[ˈmjuːkəs] nmuco

mucus

(ˈmjuːkəs) noun
the fluid from the nose.

mu·cus

n. moco, mucosidad, sustancia viscosa segregada por las membranas y glándulas mucosas.

mucus

n mucosidad f, moco
References in classic literature ?
And when I desired honey I only desired bait, and sweet mucus and mucilage, for which even the mouths of growling bears, and strange, sulky, evil birds, water:
It was a yellowish brown and seemed coated with a rough and half-dry mucus.
The airway usually produces some mucus that covers its lining.
Japanese researchers have found that abnormal delivery of zinc to lung cells contributes to obstructive pulmonary diseases, a collective term for refractory respiratory diseases with chronic airway inflammation and excessive mucus retention that are accompanied by airway obstruction.
While you may think nothing of it, simply associating it with your sickness, the color of the mucus can tell you some things about the pathogens invading your body.
Normally they are empty and contain a little amount of mucus and no fluid.
But Damman was interested in another question: Does mucus, a slimy substance in a chameleon's spit, also help it catch its prey?
The mice intestines' mucus layer remained a thick protective layer against infection.
Fortunately, there's a remedy that can help dry that mucus up.
Long-term exposure to irritants, such as tobacco smoke, causes the airways to get inflamed and produce more mucus than normal.
Researchers in Germany have designed micropropellers that travel through mucus, in part by liquefying their surroundings.
Professor Alyn Morice, head of cardiorespiratory studies at Hull York Medical School says: "In the day, your body's natural reaction is to swallow often, helping mucus to drain down the nose and throat.