mud turtle


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Related to mud turtle: musk turtle

mud turtle

n.
Any of various small turtles of the genus Kinosternon of the Americas, having two transverse hinges on the ventral shell and found in slow-moving fresh waters.

mud turtle

n
(Animals) any of various small turtles of the genus Kinosternon and related genera that inhabit muddy rivers in North and Central America: family Kinosternidae

mud′ tur`tle


n.
any of several small freshwater turtles of the family Kinosternidae, of North and South America, characterized by two transverse hinges on the lower shell.
[1775–85, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mud turtle - bottom-dwelling freshwater turtle inhabiting muddy rivers of North America and Central Americamud turtle - bottom-dwelling freshwater turtle inhabiting muddy rivers of North America and Central America
turtle - any of various aquatic and land reptiles having a bony shell and flipper-like limbs for swimming
genus Kinosternon, Kinosternon - type genus of the Kinosternidae
musk turtle, stinkpot - small freshwater turtle having a strong musky odor
References in periodicals archive ?
Reproductive characteristics and ecology of the mud turtle, Kinosternon subrubrum (Lacepede).
The species of turtle was later confirmed as an adult mud turtle (Kinosternon subrubrum) from photographs taken during the observation (Fig.
Another recent example of the states' effectiveness as a partner in managing wildlife trust species is the lower Florida Keys striped mud turtle (Kinosternon baurii), a small aquatic turtle that inhabits brackish and freshwater ponds in the Florida Keys.
The terrapin of the San Francisco market has been known by many common names, amongst them the Pacific mud turtle, Pacific pond turtle, Pacific terrapin, California mud turtle, California terrapin, California pond turtle, pond tortoise, western terrapin snapper, or any other conceivable combination.
concinna), and the Eastern Mud Turtle (Kinosternon s.
The Quitobaquito spring snail (Tryonia quitobaquitae), the Quitobaquito pupfish (Cyprinodon eremus), and the Sonoyta mud turtle (Kinosternon sonoriense longifemorale) are endemic to the aquatic ecosystems of the Rio Sonoyta basin, where they persist as small remnant populations.
In the states of California, Oregon, and Washington, at least 27 species of exotic (non-native) aquatic or semi-aquatic turtles from 20 genera and 5 different families have been recovered or reliably reported from within the range of 3 native aquatic turtle species: the western pond turtle (Clemmys marmorata), the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta), and the Sonoran mud turtle (Kinosternon sonoriense).
The mud turtle, Kinosternon subrubrum (n=40) was the most frequently collected reptile.
About half-an-hour later, a little black mud turtle followed the big snapping turtle and did the same thing.
The Illinois mud turtle Kinosternon flavescens spooneri was described by Smith (1951).
Movements and demography of the Sonoran mud turtle, Kinosternon sonoriense.