mudflow


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Related to mudflow: volcanic mudflow

mud·flow

 (mŭd′flō′)
n.
1. A flowing mass of soft, wet, unconsolidated earth and fine-grained debris, made fluid by rain or melted snow and often building up great speed.
2. The deposit resulting from such a flow.

mudflow

(ˈmʌdˌfləʊ)
n
(Geological Science) geology a flow of soil or fine-grained sediment mixed with water down a steep unstable slope

mud•flow

(ˈmʌdˌfloʊ)

n.
a flow of mixed earth debris containing a large amount of water.
[1900–05]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The mudflow has continued, eventually reaching a key river, where it has devastated wildlife and threatened the drinking water supply for hundreds of thousands of people downstream.
The collapse happened due to mudflow caused by heavy rain in the region, Chinese news agency Xinhua reported.
In mudflow areas, build channels or deflection wall to direct the flow around buildings.
The authors propose that the mud, after it erupted from the ground, oozed down the slope in a way unlike any mudflow on Earth.
Mudflow means a river of liquid and flowing mud on the surfaces of normally dry land, as when earth is carried by a current of water.
Among the 34 included papers, topics discussed are methods of population warning and communication in the case of landslips, large artificial water reservoirs and dams as critical risk objects in Armenia, prevention and intervention in the case of catastrophes in the Moldava area of Romania, mudflow protection in the city of Yerevan, and licensing and controlling mining operations to prevent emergencies.
Volcanologists plan to install three so-called ''acoustic flow measurement'' devices in rivers originating from the volcano for early detection of volcanic mudflow.
In 1595, 636 people were killed after a mudflow swept down the mountainside.
Land-use zoning, professional inspections, and proper design can minimize many landslide, mudflow, and debris flow problems.
He said that although the ash was unlikely to be of direct danger to residents, there was the risk it could turn into a deadly mudflow, as happened during the last eruption in 2006, when hundreds of people were swept away.
It was not huge in size, but did include a mudflow of about 20 cubic yards that raced over the highway midmorning, he said.
Most of us have seen news footage of a landslide or mudflow impacting roads or homes, triggered by a large rain event, seasonal wet conditions, or flooding," says Benjamin Rivers, a geotechnical engineer with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA).