multicellular

(redirected from multicellularity)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

mul·ti·cel·lu·lar

 (mŭl′tē-sĕl′yə-lər, -tī-)
adj.
Having or consisting of many cells: multicellular organisms.

mul′ti·cel′lu·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.

multicellular

(ˌmʌltɪˈsɛljʊlə) ,

multicell

or

multicelled

adj
(Biology) having many cells

mul·ti·cel·lu·lar

(mŭl′tē-sĕl′yə-lər)
Having or consisting of many cells: multicellular organisms. Compare unicellular.

multicellular

Composed of many cells.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.multicellular - consisting of many cells; "multicellular organisms"
cellular - characterized by or divided into or containing cells or compartments (the smallest organizational or structural unit of an organism or organization); "the cellular construction of a beehive"; "any effective opposition to a totalitarian regime must be secretive and cellular"
Translations
monisoluinen
višestaničan

multicellular

[ˌmʌltɪˈseljʊləʳ] ADJmulticelular

multicellular

[mʌltɪˈsɛljʊləʳ] adjpluricellulare

mul·ti·cel·lu·lar

a. multicelular, que consiste de varias células.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evolutionary Transitions in Individuality: Multicellularity and Sex.
Objective: Understanding the evolution of multicellularity and cellular differentiation/ complexity is one of the greatest challenges in biology.
The leap from unicellularity to multicellularity is possible only if the originally independent cells collaborate.
25 ( ANI ): A plant evolutionary biologist has now reviewed the history of multicellularity and the changes that cells must have had to go through - like aspects of their shape, function, structure, and development - in order to be able to functionally combine with other cells.
14, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- From Massachusetts to Mississippi, a unicellular protist is hinting at answers about the evolution of multicellularity while raising a whole new set of questions.
5 billion years ago, multicellularity arose and contributed to a wide diversification of eukaryotes.
In the case of multicellularity, many of the same proteins stick cells to one another and communicate messages between cells in all living animals.
In fact, multicellularity probably evolved several times in plants and fungi, but only once in animals.
Gould cites the billion year reign of the bacteria as life's sole representative as evidence that there is no inexorable push toward size or multicellularity yet we know that there were constraints in the environment of early earth that favored this minimalist approach to existence.
As an aside, before I go on to tackle the multicellularity issue, I want to mention an article I found on the evolution of viruses, a group that doesn't seem to get much attention in terms of its evolutionary origins, though present-day viral evolution is a major public-health issue (Balter, 2000).

Full browser ?