multilateralist


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Related to multilateralist: bleeding-heart

mul·ti·lat·er·al

 (mŭl′tĭ-lăt′ər-əl)
adj.
1. Having many sides.
2. Involving more than two nations or parties: multilateral trade agreements.

mul′ti·lat′er·al·ism n.
mul′ti·lat′er·al·ist n.
mul′ti·lat′er·al·ly adv.

multilateralist

(ˌmʌltɪˈlætərəlɪst)
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) involving or favouring the involvement of more than two nations or parties
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who favours a multilateral approach
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References in periodicals archive ?
Jackie Baillie, whose constituency takes in the base, said: "I'm a multilateralist - I want a world with no nuclear weapons.
By requiring Washington to calibrate a more globally multilateralist burden-sharing posture of devolutionary offshore balancing, this may encourage the striking of an optimum balance between addressing domestic imperatives and sustaining the United States' lead role in a changing world order.
Ironically, Obama the multilateralist has not yet followed George H.
Today, it seems, Congress is a multilateralist president's "coalition" of last resort, he said.
Bush, on foreign policy by presenting himself as more multilateralist.
US President Barack Obama has tried to distinguish himself from his predecessor, George W Bush, on foreign policy by presenting himself as more multilateralist.
You can speak with credibility based on your own financial sector success, but you are also regarded as a leading multilateralist," said Lagarde.
In its adjustment to the changing world, China has become deeply committed to East Asian regionalism and to a multilateralist foreign policy.
President Obama strongly believes in a multilateralist approach, cooperating with other countries in order to spread responsibility.
It's a paradox that this genuinely multilateralist administration, eager to break with the unilateral policymaking of George W.
And while he is not an enthusiastic free trader, he is a multilateralist and would probably favour a global trade deal.
In many ways, Jones, Pascual, and Stedman amalgamate well-known multilateralist and neo-idealist works (for example, those of Robert Axelrod, Robert Keohane, and Hedley Bull) with their collective practices.

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